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You searched for subject:(dingoes). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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RMIT University

1. Johnstone-Robertson, S. Disease emergence and dynamics on biologically motivated contact networks.

Degree: 2017, RMIT University

Infectious disease transmission requires that epidemiologically relevant contact occurs between infectious and susceptible individuals. Thus, for mathematical models to accurately predict disease emergence and dynamics they must incorporate the contact patterns responsible for transmission. In this context, this thesis investigates how the level of contact detail included in an infectious disease model influences its predictions. Three models are considered. The first investigates infections spreading through territorial populations, with potential canine rabies spread in Australian wild dogs a case study. Two factors governing wild dog contacts are considered: geographic distance and heterogeneous wild dog behaviour. Not including spatial constraints results in a model that overestimates the probability of an epidemic and that fails to generate the outcome 'rate of spread'. Conversely, not incorporating heterogeneous dog behaviour results in a model that underestimates the probability an epidemic will occur. The second model investigates tick-borne pathogen spread between ticks and vertebrate hosts. Key features of tick feeding behaviour include: tick aggregation on hosts, co-aggregation of larval and nymphal ticks on the same hosts, and co-feeding. Co-aggregation increases R0. Models failing to incorporate tick co-aggregation will therefore underestimate the likelihood of pathogen emergence, especially in geographic regions and seasons where larval burden is high and for pathogens mainly transmitted during co-feeding. The third model investigates the effect of clustering (triangle and square contact patterns) on the spread of infection through social networks. Clustering reduces R0 and the magnitude of the reduction increases with higher transmission probabilities. Models that fail to incorporate clustering will overestimate the likelihood of disease establishment, especially for highly transmissible diseases. In conclusion, the three disease models collectively reveal model predictions are improved and additional outcomes are generated by the inclusion of realistic host contact patterns. These findings reinforce the value of incorporating biologically-faithful contact patterns into infectious disease models.

Subjects/Keywords: Fields of Research; contact patterns; infectious disease model; basic reproduction number; R0; canine rabies; Australian wild dogs; dingos; dingoes; spatial model; heterogeneity; tick-borne pathogens; aggregation; co-aggregation; co-feeding; clustering; social networks

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnstone-Robertson, S. (2017). Disease emergence and dynamics on biologically motivated contact networks. (Thesis). RMIT University. Retrieved from http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:162413

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnstone-Robertson, S. “Disease emergence and dynamics on biologically motivated contact networks.” 2017. Thesis, RMIT University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:162413.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnstone-Robertson, S. “Disease emergence and dynamics on biologically motivated contact networks.” 2017. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Johnstone-Robertson S. Disease emergence and dynamics on biologically motivated contact networks. [Internet] [Thesis]. RMIT University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:162413.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Johnstone-Robertson S. Disease emergence and dynamics on biologically motivated contact networks. [Thesis]. RMIT University; 2017. Available from: http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:162413

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Australian National University

2. Stuart, Amanda Graham. The Dingo in the colonial imagination .

Degree: Australian National University

This thesis is comprised of two parts: a Studio Research component with accompanying Exegesis (66%), and a Dissertation (33%). The Dissertation provides the historical theoretical component that informs the Studio Research and Exegesis, entitled The Dingo in the Colonial Imagination.This body of work investigates the tensions between humans and animals that share boundaries. It focuses on the terse relations between humans, dingoes and wild dogs in southeastern Australia. Ideological and practical themes emerged through the studio-based and theoretical research, which spans a range of disciplines including art, science, culture and history. At its core is how humans and undomesticated animals share arbitrary boundaries and suffer the transgression of these boundaries. Primary field research informed the studio and theoretical aspects of the project. It involved consultation with individuals and agencies affected by dingoes and wild dogs in interface zones where private and government managed lands intersect. The 30,000 word dissertation traces colonial visual representations of the Australian native dog during the century that spans early European settlement to Federation. It follows perceptions of the dingo as it is imagined and encountered by European settlers. The dingo's guise ranges from scientific curiosity, object of desire, symbol of wilderness, metaphor for a dying race and as an enemy that threatens the social and economic fabric of the colonial project. The studio work amplifies the influence of these colonial perceptions on contemporary attitudes to dingoes. It follows a trajectory of the disappearing dingo in its representational form, to its implied remnant presence within the farmers' psyche. Early studio work explored a range of materials and practices, encompassing sculptural and drawing strategies, and took its cue from a macabre ritual of animal shaming in remote regional Australia, the so-called 'dog trees', that display the carcasses of one or multiple dingoes and wild dogs. The studio work has culminated in a large-scale sculptural installation, designed to pare back the visual language to its essential elements. This work incorporates the dissolution of the dingo form, which becomes absorbed into the personal objects embedded into the farmers' private territory. The poetic objects that form the final sculptural work presented for examination, Lines of desire, become metaphors for the dingo's capacity to survive and unsettle the rural subconscious.

Subjects/Keywords: tensions; humans; animals; dingoes; wild dogs; southeastern Australia; colonial; visual representations; early European settlement; Federation; scientific curiosity; object of desire; symbol of wilderness; metaphor for a dying race; enemy; threat; farmers' private territory

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stuart, A. G. (n.d.). The Dingo in the colonial imagination . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/109295

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stuart, Amanda Graham. “The Dingo in the colonial imagination .” Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/109295.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stuart, Amanda Graham. “The Dingo in the colonial imagination .” Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Stuart AG. The Dingo in the colonial imagination . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/109295.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Stuart AG. The Dingo in the colonial imagination . [Thesis]. Australian National University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/109295

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

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