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You searched for subject:(difficult dialogues). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Fjelstrom, Jo. Spirituality and atheist social work students: contributions for curriculum content on spirituality.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2016, Colorado State University

The purpose of this constructivist study was to gain information about a criterion sample of atheist social work students concerning their experiences and perspectives of spirituality and curriculum content on spirituality. Most of the twenty-two participants formed their atheist worldviews against the tide of a religious upbringing, primarily due to their assessment of a dissonance between their evaluations of reality and religious beliefs. From the findings and the literature, suggestions are made for curriculum content on spirituality: (a) educators should frame worldviews as constructions and treat mystical elements as cultural phenomena; (b) content should have a professional focus with academically appropriate content; (c) curriculum content should be planned around the goal of training social work students to effectively address issues about worldviews in practice; (d) inclusive language and content should be utilized that covers all worldviews, including atheist and other naturalist worldviews; (e) biases, stereotypes, and privilege should be addressed and countered; (f) specific dialogic techniques should be developed for use in the classroom; (g) educators who will teach content on worldviews should have specific training for teaching material on spirituality and worldviews; and (h) a task force should be formed to create guidelines for curriculum content on spirituality. Advisors/Committee Members: Carlson, Laurie (advisor), Buchan, Victoria (advisor), Lynham, Susan (committee member), Tungate, Susan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: curriculum development; social work education; difficult dialogues; atheism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fjelstrom, J. (2016). Spirituality and atheist social work students: contributions for curriculum content on spirituality. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/173389

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fjelstrom, Jo. “Spirituality and atheist social work students: contributions for curriculum content on spirituality.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/173389.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fjelstrom, Jo. “Spirituality and atheist social work students: contributions for curriculum content on spirituality.” 2016. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Fjelstrom J. Spirituality and atheist social work students: contributions for curriculum content on spirituality. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/173389.

Council of Science Editors:

Fjelstrom J. Spirituality and atheist social work students: contributions for curriculum content on spirituality. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/173389


Penn State University

2. Benoist, Lauren N. Conflict Stories in Multicultural Counselor Education: A Narrative Inquiry Among Counselors In Training.

Degree: 2016, Penn State University

A multicultural counseling class brings both challenges and rewards for its instructors and students. In particular, research indicates that interpersonal and intercultural conflicts are present despite understanding the important perspectives that students might offer (Burton & Furr, 2014; Sue, Lin, Torino, Capodilupo & Rivera, 2009b; Sue, Rivera, Capodipulo, Lin & Torino, 2010). The focus of this study was to illuminate this perspective in order to understand the conflict experiences that occur in multicultural counseling classes with master’s counseling students. The purpose of this research was to provide insight about the retellings, characteristics, and meanings of conflicts that students experience by using narrative analysis. King and Baxter Magolda’s model for intercultural maturity (2005) and Mezirow’s (1978) transformational learning theory provided a conceptual framework and influenced the data analysis. Several findings emerged from this study. While each participant had uniquely distinct conflicts, qualitative analysis materialized thematic linkages across them. Three overarching domains surfaced in the horizontal analysis between stories: Class expectations, types of conflict experiences, and transformation. Conflict experiences were also categorized with three integral themes: intercultural, intracultural, and institutional. The final domain, transformation, articulated the residues of conflict experiences: the generation of new meanings. Findings demonstrate the diverse and distinct quality of stories of master’s level students who experience conflict in their multicultural counseling class as they navigate the complex tasks of professional identity development. Because not every student experiencing conflict articulated new meanings, further research may be needed about the factors of conflict experiences that foster transformation. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Katie Kostohryz, Dissertation Advisor/Co-Advisor, Dr. Katie Kostohryz, Committee Chair/Co-Chair, Dr. Jason Gines, Committee Member, Dr. JoLynn Carney, Committee Member, Dr. Peggy Lorah, Outside Member.

Subjects/Keywords: Multicultural Counseling; difficult dialogues; counselor education; narrative inquiry; pedagogy; conflict; intercultural maturity; transformative learning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Benoist, L. N. (2016). Conflict Stories in Multicultural Counselor Education: A Narrative Inquiry Among Counselors In Training. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/0g354f20t

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Benoist, Lauren N. “Conflict Stories in Multicultural Counselor Education: A Narrative Inquiry Among Counselors In Training.” 2016. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/0g354f20t.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Benoist, Lauren N. “Conflict Stories in Multicultural Counselor Education: A Narrative Inquiry Among Counselors In Training.” 2016. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Benoist LN. Conflict Stories in Multicultural Counselor Education: A Narrative Inquiry Among Counselors In Training. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/0g354f20t.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Benoist LN. Conflict Stories in Multicultural Counselor Education: A Narrative Inquiry Among Counselors In Training. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2016. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/0g354f20t

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Tittler, Meredith. How to engage European-American participants in racial dialogue: The role of dialogue structure and mixed race groups.

Degree: 2017, Iowa State University

One effective strategy for combatting racism and promoting understanding across racial lines is group dialogue (e.g., Nagda, 2006). Previous research of racial dialogues has used a self-selecting participant pool of individuals who are motivated to participate in racial dialogues (e.g., Gurin, Nagda & Zuniga, 2013). Research up to this point has not investigated the portion of the population who do not willingly participate in racial dialogues. Previous research suggests that European-Americans may be a portion of the population especially avoidant of racial dialogues (e.g., Sue, 2013). Understanding the reasons European-Americans are avoidant of racial dialogues is an important prerequisite to creating interventions to increase participation. In the current study, I examined factors that affect European-American participants’ interest and willingness to participate in a racial dialogue. The specific factors are: facilitator structuring of the dialogue with ground rules (structured condition) vs. a facilitator who does no structuring beyond introducing the conversation topic (not-structured condition), as well as the effect of being in an inter-group dialogue (mixed race group) vs. an intra-group dialogue (all-European-American group). Participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions of a racial dialogue vignette varying across the two variables (structured vs. not-structured; inter-group vs. intra-group). The main findings from this study include a significant interaction between the racial make-up of the dialogue group and the structure of the group on participants’ willingness to share their honest thoughts. It was found that participants were more willing to share their thoughts in structured, mixed-race groups than structured all- European-American groups or not-structured mixed-race groups. I also found that the structure of the group had a significant effect on participants’ reported interest in participating in a similar group on campus.

Subjects/Keywords: Difficult dialogues; Multicultural competence; Race; Small groups; Counseling Psychology; Educational Psychology; International and Intercultural Communication; Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Difficult Dialogues”, which was begun in 2005. As of this time, the Ford Foundation had provided… …Foundation Launches,” 2005, para. 2). Planned difficult dialogues One format for planned group… …Rogge & Garlington, 2006). The IGD program provides a framework for difficult dialogues… …individuals who willingly signed up for difficult dialogues on race. Thus, the results of the study… …before any strong conclusions can be drawn. Spontaneous difficult dialogues Although planned… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tittler, M. (2017). How to engage European-American participants in racial dialogue: The role of dialogue structure and mixed race groups. (Thesis). Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/15629

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tittler, Meredith. “How to engage European-American participants in racial dialogue: The role of dialogue structure and mixed race groups.” 2017. Thesis, Iowa State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/15629.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tittler, Meredith. “How to engage European-American participants in racial dialogue: The role of dialogue structure and mixed race groups.” 2017. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Tittler M. How to engage European-American participants in racial dialogue: The role of dialogue structure and mixed race groups. [Internet] [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/15629.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tittler M. How to engage European-American participants in racial dialogue: The role of dialogue structure and mixed race groups. [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2017. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/15629

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.