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You searched for subject:(dietary acid load). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of New South Wales

1. Kozan, Pinar. The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans.

Degree: St Vincent's Clinical School, 2018, University of New South Wales

Background: High dietary acid load relates to increased risk of type 2 diabetes in epidemiological studies. We aimed to investigate whether buffering a high acid load meal with an alkalising treatment changes post meal glucose metabolism. Methods: Non-diabetic participants (n=32) were randomized to receive either NaHCO3 1680mg or placebo, followed by a high acid load meal in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover (1-4 weeks apart) study. Thirty (20 males) participants completed the study. Venous blood pH, serum bicarbonate, blood glucose, serum insulin, C-peptide, non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA), and plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations were measured at baseline (fasting) and at 15-30min intervals for 3h post meal. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. Venous blood pH declined in the first 15min post meal with the placebo (p=0.001), but not with NaHCO3 (p=0.86) and remained lower with the placebo for 3h (pinteraction=0.04). The iAUC of pH was significantly higher following the NaHCO3 treatment versus the placebo (p=0.02). However, postprandial glucose, insulin, C-peptide, NEFA and GLP-1 were not different between treatments (pinteraction≥0.07). Conclusions: An alkalising medication administered pre-meal has no acute effect on glycaemia and insulin response in healthy individuals. Long-term interventions in at-risk populations are necessary to investigate the effect of sustained alkalisation on glucose metabolism. Advisors/Committee Members: Greenfield , Jerry, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Samocha-Bonet, Dorit, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: acid-base homeostasis; alkaline diet; dietary acid load; type 2 diabetes; sodium bicarbonate; postprandial glycaemia

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APA (6th Edition):

Kozan, P. (2018). The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans. (Masters Thesis). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59592 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:49042/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kozan, Pinar. “The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59592 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:49042/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kozan, Pinar. “The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans.” 2018. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Kozan P. The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59592 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:49042/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Kozan P. The effect of buffering a high acid load meal with sodium bicarbonate on postprandial glucose metabolism in humans. [Masters Thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2018. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/59592 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:49042/SOURCE02?view=true


University of Kansas

2. Taylor, Jacob M. DIETARY FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRESSION OF AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE.

Degree: PhD, Dietetics & Nutrition, 2015, University of Kansas

Introduction: Dietary factors (sodium, protein, acid precursors, and fluid) have been observed to influence cyst growth in human and animal studies of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). However, no studies have been conducted to control such dietary constituents. Body mass index (BMI) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), factors associated with dietary behaviors, have also been reported to associate with ADPKD progression and warrant further examination. The following series of studies aimed to (1) determine whether patients could adhere to a low sodium, low protein, low acid precursor diet with increased fluid intake; (2) understand participants’ experiences and perspectives as they attempted to follow the diet; (3) reveal potential barriers that may reduce the likelihood of long-term adherence; (4) determine if data obtained from the electronic health record (EHR) can be used to identify risk factors associated with ADPKD progression (BMI and HDL). Methods: A four-week dietary intervention was conducted to determine if a relatively complex dietary prescription targeting salt, protein, acid precursors, and fluid intake would be adopted by adult patients with ADPKD. Consecutive 24-hour urine collections were analyzed for sodium, urea, net acid excretion (NAE), urine volume, and osmolality. Three-day diet records were analyzed for sodium, protein, net endogenous acid production (NEAP), and fluid intake. A basic metabolic panel was obtained from blood samples. Blood pressure, height, and weight were obtained by a nurse at each visit. Outcomes were measured at baseline, two weeks, and four weeks. Following the dietary intervention, interviews and a Nutrition Hassles Questionnaire (NHQ) were conducted with participants to determine how difficult it was for them to follow the diet. Finally, we collected BMI and HDL levels from the EHRs of ADPKD patients seen at the University of Kansas Medical Center and determined their associations with the age of reaching kidney failure (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≤ 15ml/min/1.73m2). Results: The dietary changes caused a decrease in daily sodium excretion (-20%), urea excretion (-28%), and NAE (-46%) while increasing urine volume 35% above baseline. Subjects eating the experimental diet reached the daily goals for sodium (≤ 1.5 mmol/kg), protein (≤ 1 g/kg), and fluid intake (mean 24h urine osmolality ≤ 285 mosm/kg) prescribed for each patient and were sustained for four weeks. NEAP decreased 58 mEq/d from baseline. Only one participant reported hassles on the NHQ as “moderately severe” and no hassles were reported as “extremely severe”. The NHQ also showed that 10 out of 11 individuals were “somewhat confident” or “very confident” that they could manage the new diet. The interviews conducted following the dietary intervention found a general consensus that reducing portion sizes of meat and increasing intake of fruits and vegetables were the easiest components of the diet while keeping track of what they ate and reaching the prescribed goal amount for… Advisors/Committee Members: Hamilton-Reeves, Jill M. (advisor), Sullivan, Debra K. (cmtemember), Carlson, Susan E. (cmtemember), Gibson, Cheryl A. (cmtemember), Grantham, Jared J. (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Nutrition; Health sciences; dietary acid load; net acid excretion; net endogenous acid production; polycystic kidney disease; potential renal acid load; renal nutrition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Taylor, J. M. (2015). DIETARY FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRESSION OF AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25637

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taylor, Jacob M. “DIETARY FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRESSION OF AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25637.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taylor, Jacob M. “DIETARY FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRESSION OF AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE.” 2015. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Taylor JM. DIETARY FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRESSION OF AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25637.

Council of Science Editors:

Taylor JM. DIETARY FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROGRESSION OF AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25637


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

3. Thorpe, Matthew P. Dietary protein and bone health: Harmonizing conflicting theories.

Degree: PhD, 0191, 2010, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

No clear consensus on the role of higher protein intakes has emerged, in spite of many decades of research. Protein unambiguously increases urinary calcium losses, which is completely attributable to the dietary acid load imposed by metabolism of sulfur containing amino acids into acid equivalents. Although alternate dietary sources of fixed acid cause demineralization of bone and apparent osteoporosis, this effect has not been consistently observed for protein, suggesting opposing, beneficial effects on bone. Specifically, protein may improve bone health through improving calcium absorption, increasing total circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 or by improving lean body mass which in turn increases bone growth. Although the notion of competing positive and negative pathways has been articulated theoretically, statistical mediation models of this ???dual pathways??? relationship have not been employed to quantify these relationships. In a cross-sectional investigation of postmenopausal women, protein intake is positively related to bone mineral density of the lumbar spine following adjustment for an accompanying negative effect mediated by the sulfur containing fraction of protein. In growing rats, an analogous and complementary pattern emerged: A negative association of protein intake with bone strength was suppressed by an opposing, positive effect of protein mediated by insulin-like growth factor 1. A second animal study assessed the influence of protein source on bone strength and bone mineral content of growing rats consuming isoenergetic, isonitrogenous diets. The influence of protein source was completely mediated by the corresponding changes in lean body mass. A randomized, controlled trial indicated a higher protein diet preserved bone density during weight loss compared to a conventional, MyPyramid based diet; however the protein diet also contained more calcium. A mathematical model of calcium availability in this trial suggested that this additional dietary calcium was not sufficient to explain differences in calcium accrual between groups unless calcium availability was also improved in the higher protein diet. Also, within this study, urine calcium (a surrogate of the diet acid load) exhibited a negative association with bone density change, in spite of its positive association with protein intake. The striking consistency of a dual pathway model across populations and experimental models lends credence to the notion that dietary protein may hold a positive or negative effect on bone health, depending on other factors in the diet. Specifically, we find support that the sulfur containing amino acid induced dietary acid load holds negative effects that may be opposed by positive influences of insulin-like growth factor 1, calcium availability or lean body mass. On average, this effect is probably null or too small to be of clinical importance. The effect may be of public health relevance, however, if the diet can be manipulated in order to uncouple positive and negative pathways. If… Advisors/Committee Members: Evans, Ellen M. (advisor), Layman, Donald K. (Committee Chair), Evans, Ellen M. (committee member), Erdman, John W. (committee member), Chapman-Novakofski, Karen M. (committee member), Wagoner Johnson, Amy J. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Nutrition; Dietary protein; Bone; Osteoporosis; Protein; Diet acid load; Bone density; Bone strength; Bone structure; Bone architecture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thorpe, M. P. (2010). Dietary protein and bone health: Harmonizing conflicting theories. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16964

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thorpe, Matthew P. “Dietary protein and bone health: Harmonizing conflicting theories.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16964.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thorpe, Matthew P. “Dietary protein and bone health: Harmonizing conflicting theories.” 2010. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Thorpe MP. Dietary protein and bone health: Harmonizing conflicting theories. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16964.

Council of Science Editors:

Thorpe MP. Dietary protein and bone health: Harmonizing conflicting theories. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16964

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