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You searched for subject:(dianetics). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Edinburgh

1. Koebbel, Christian. Dianetics and the construction of science: A Disourse Analysis.

Degree: 2008, University of Edinburgh

In 1950, L.R. Hubbard, which would become later the founding father of Scientology, published a book claiming to have found a new science of the human mind, superior to psychology and psychiatry, called ‘Dianetics’. These claims have been the origin of a heated controversy on the scientific status of Dianetics which continues in one form or the other until the present day. Using a social constructionist and discourse analytic approach (e.g. Potter Potter, 1996; Potter & Wetherell, 1987; Edwards & Potter, 1992) the present study analyses some instances of text related to the debate on Dianetics. In the face of the contested nature of Dianetics, it focuses on how truth claims and scientific status are constructed. In particular, it analyses in detail how factual accounts and descriptions are worked up in discourse through the rhetoric of utility, authority, heroism and novelty and the employment of rhetorical devices such as empiricist rhetoric, contingent rhetoric, category entitlement, alignment and the way in which these accounts construct Dianetics as lying within or outside the boundaries of psychology and science. Given the importance of scientific status to Psychology, and the absence of a clear demarcation between science and other bodies of knowledge, the present study joins other scholars (e.g. Lamont 2007, McKinlay & Potter, 1987) who argue for recognising the need to examine more closely the processes that lead to bodies of psychological knowledge ‘becoming’ scientific Advisors/Committee Members: Lamont, Peter.

Subjects/Keywords: dianetics; discourse analysis; scientology; science

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APA (6th Edition):

Koebbel, C. (2008). Dianetics and the construction of science: A Disourse Analysis. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2925

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koebbel, Christian. “Dianetics and the construction of science: A Disourse Analysis.” 2008. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed April 01, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2925.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koebbel, Christian. “Dianetics and the construction of science: A Disourse Analysis.” 2008. Web. 01 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Koebbel C. Dianetics and the construction of science: A Disourse Analysis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2008. [cited 2020 Apr 01]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2925.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Koebbel C. Dianetics and the construction of science: A Disourse Analysis. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/2925

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Sydney

2. Charet, Raymond Matthew. A Civilisation Without Insanity? Psychiatry, Dianetics and the Birth of Scientology .

Degree: 2015, University of Sydney

With his development of Dianetics, Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard was presenting the first criticism of the profession of psychiatry as a whole, in many ways pre-empting by a decade the later emergence in the 1960s of what has come to be referred to as the anti-psychiatric movement. Previous critics had either sought to bring about reform of the profession or objected to specific practices. Rather than adopting this approach, Hubbard drew inspiration from these separate criticisms and brought them all together within a single work. Hubbard’s 1950 book Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, presented a summary of the full range of criticism that had been levelled at American psychiatric practice over the preceding half century. This study locates the emergence of Dianetics and Scientology against a backdrop of professional and popular criticism of psychiatry. It also explores how American society contributed in significant ways to the fundamental ideas behind Dianetics, how Hubbard sought to validate his new ‘science of the mind’ in both professional practice and popular culture, and how this validation was rejected professionally but nevertheless found an accommodating niche with the American public. Exploring how and why this was the case form the core of this study. After establishing the methodological framework within which this exploration takes place, the opening chapter presents a summary of modern Scientology’s criticisms of psychiatry approximately sixty years after the tradition was founded. The discussion then turns to a broad survey of the state of American psychiatric practice in the decades immediately preceding Hubbard’s writing, presenting a picture of a profession undergoing both external challenges and internal shifts in emphasis, with the rise of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis as talk-based alternatives to physical treatment. Following this, the work moves to an examination of the popular alternatives to traditional psychiatric practice such as New Thought and self-help, as well as locating the emergence of these alternatives from previous psychiatric explorations. From here, attention shifts to a discussion of Hubbard’s life and the development of his ideas, primarily using official Scientology sources for the insights they provide into the arguably hagiographical elements of religious biography in seeking to establish his assertion of superior authority. The process by which Hubbard claimed to develop his ideas and the foundation of the early organisation which supported their dissemination are also examined. The contents of Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health are then presented and analysed, and finally, the study presents a discussion of the reception afforded Dianetics on its publication in May 1950. This study demonstrates that Hubbard’s ideas emerged in part from a culture of criticism of psychiatry in a fluid professional landscape. In his criticism, however, Hubbard was at pains to present his own alternative as a more effective, more scientific, and…

Subjects/Keywords: Scientology; Dianetics; Hubbard; Psychiatry; Anti-Psychiatry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Charet, R. M. (2015). A Civilisation Without Insanity? Psychiatry, Dianetics and the Birth of Scientology . (Thesis). University of Sydney. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2123/14892

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Charet, Raymond Matthew. “A Civilisation Without Insanity? Psychiatry, Dianetics and the Birth of Scientology .” 2015. Thesis, University of Sydney. Accessed April 01, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2123/14892.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Charet, Raymond Matthew. “A Civilisation Without Insanity? Psychiatry, Dianetics and the Birth of Scientology .” 2015. Web. 01 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Charet RM. A Civilisation Without Insanity? Psychiatry, Dianetics and the Birth of Scientology . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Sydney; 2015. [cited 2020 Apr 01]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/14892.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Charet RM. A Civilisation Without Insanity? Psychiatry, Dianetics and the Birth of Scientology . [Thesis]. University of Sydney; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/14892

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Universitetet i Tromsø

3. Hellesøy, Kjersti. Independent Scientology. How Ron's Org and Dror Center schismed out of the Church of Scientology .

Degree: 2015, Universitetet i Tromsø

This thesis is about Ron’s Org and Dror Center, two independent Scientology groups. They schismed away from the Church of Scientology at different times and under different circumstances. Ron’s Org is the older of the two, and are spread over large parts of the world, with their main activity focused on Europe. I have visited the headquarter in Switzerland and some of the many Ron’s Orgs in Moscow, Russia. Dror Center has only been independent for a little over three years. They are located in Haifa, Israel, and I went to visit them and attend courses and auditing with them for two weeks. I will look at the underlying factors contributing to schisms, asking the questions: Which factors within the organizational structure of CoS makes the organization more likely to produce schisms? Why become independent? What kind of resources are necessary to establish a successful schismatic group? What kind of strategies do Ron’s Org and Dror Center use to survive as independent Scientology groups? I will frame my analysis within theories on charisma, religious authority and schism. Advisors/Committee Members: Lewis, James R (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: VDP::Humanities: 000::Theology and religious science: 150::Religious science, religious history: 153; VDP::Humaniora: 000::Teologi og religionsvitenskap: 150::Religionsvitenskap, religionshistorie: 153; Scientology; Dianetics; Hubbard; LRH; schism; Dror; Ron's Org; building blocks; Mission Holder Conference; Mission Holders' Conference; totalitarian; charisma; movement milieu; schism as midwife

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hellesøy, K. (2015). Independent Scientology. How Ron's Org and Dror Center schismed out of the Church of Scientology . (Masters Thesis). Universitetet i Tromsø. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10037/8353

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hellesøy, Kjersti. “Independent Scientology. How Ron's Org and Dror Center schismed out of the Church of Scientology .” 2015. Masters Thesis, Universitetet i Tromsø. Accessed April 01, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10037/8353.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hellesøy, Kjersti. “Independent Scientology. How Ron's Org and Dror Center schismed out of the Church of Scientology .” 2015. Web. 01 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Hellesøy K. Independent Scientology. How Ron's Org and Dror Center schismed out of the Church of Scientology . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Universitetet i Tromsø 2015. [cited 2020 Apr 01]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10037/8353.

Council of Science Editors:

Hellesøy K. Independent Scientology. How Ron's Org and Dror Center schismed out of the Church of Scientology . [Masters Thesis]. Universitetet i Tromsø 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10037/8353

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