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You searched for subject:(depth of wells). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Taylor, Kendrick C. Application of borehole geophysical methods to shallow groundwater investigations.

Degree: 1987, University of Nevada – Reno

Borehole geophysical methods have been used extensively for petroleum and mineral exploration; but due to differences in environment and survey objective, modifications of both equipment and interpretation are necessary for shallow groundwater applications. These applications require the use of complementary borehole measurements which can be related to the formation properties by comparison to core samples. Different interpretation strategies must be developed for different environments, strategies for use in unsaturated, saturated with clay present, saturated without clay present, and hydraulically anisotropic environments are developed. Parameters that can be determined are porosity, moisture content, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater velocity, cation exchange content, and pore fluid conductivity. All logging instrumentation measures a property over a short interval of the well. It is important when combining logs to insure that all logs used in the comparison are vertical averages of the same portion with respect to both depth and length of the well. It is also possible to reduce the effect of the vertical averaging by the instrumentation through the use of numerical techniques. A field example is used to demonstrate these methods. The techniques presented make it practical to determine a formation hydraulic properties on a scale of a few tens of centimeters. This high resolution distribution of the formation in turn permits the development of a class of contaminate transport models which utilize the high resolution description of the aquifer variability. These models do not require large scale dependent dispersity terms to match field data because the contaminate movement is realistically described by shear flow in the high resolution advective flow field of the model. A one dimensional model is presented as an example of this class of model. Advisors/Committee Members: Wheatcraft, Stephen (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: borehole geophysical methods; petroleum exploration; mineral exploration; environment; survey objective; modifications of equipment; modifications of interpretation; shallow groundwater applications; complimentary borehole measurements; formation properties; core; clay; samples; interpretation strategies; unsaturated with clay present; saturated with clay present; saturated without clay present; hydraulically anisotropic environments; porosity; moisture content; hydraulic conductivity; groundwater velocity; cation exchange content; pore fluid conductivity; logging instrumentation measures; wells; logs; vertical averages; depth of wells; length of wells; numerical techniques; formation hydraulic properties; high resolution distribution; contaminate transport models; high resolution description; aquifer variability; dependent diversity; contaminate movement; shear flow; high resolution advective flow field; Mackay Science Project; groundwater  – sampling; groundwater flow; hydraulic measurements; hydrogeology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Taylor, K. C. (1987). Application of borehole geophysical methods to shallow groundwater investigations. (Thesis). University of Nevada – Reno. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11714/1743

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taylor, Kendrick C. “Application of borehole geophysical methods to shallow groundwater investigations.” 1987. Thesis, University of Nevada – Reno. Accessed February 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11714/1743.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taylor, Kendrick C. “Application of borehole geophysical methods to shallow groundwater investigations.” 1987. Web. 27 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Taylor KC. Application of borehole geophysical methods to shallow groundwater investigations. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 1987. [cited 2021 Feb 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/1743.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Taylor KC. Application of borehole geophysical methods to shallow groundwater investigations. [Thesis]. University of Nevada – Reno; 1987. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11714/1743

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Okano, Ryan L. Potential influences of submarine groundwater discharge, nutrients, and herbivory on Hawaiian reef algae.

Degree: 2016, University of Hawaii – Manoa

Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2011.

Phase shifts have occurred on tropical reefs throughout the world. In Hawaii, phase shifts have been attributed to eutrophication, herbivore reduction, and alien algae. The first study from this dissertation examines the environmental relationships of Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD), a likely source of anthropogenic nutrients to Hawaii‟s reefs. The second study analyzes the relative and simultaneous effects of nutrient enrichment and reduced herbivory on algal succession in contrast to control conditions. The third study assesses the potential of indigenous herbivorous fish to control alien algae. The fine scale salinity profiles in the first study established differences between the average salinity values of three sample events, and correlations between SGD and low tide and, SGD and depth. Water quality samples displayed correlations with SGD and concentrations of numerous chemical constituents. Nitrate from water quality samples at Waiopae were up to 3.8 times greater than samples from upland wells suggesting that anthropogenic sources of nitrate are intruding the aquifer. This study exemplifies the dynamics of SGD and nutrient intrusion. Results from the second study in Kealakekua Bay show that the effects of nutrient enrichment were minor, herbivore reduction were considerable, and nutrient enrichment combined with herbivore reduction were major in governing algal biomass and cover. Coralline crustose algae dominated surfaces under control and nutrient enrichment. In herbivore reduction treatments turf algae dominated. Nutrient enrichment had a greater effect at one site, and herbivore reduction had a greater effect at another site, demonstrating that a single solution may not be equally effective for all Hawaiian reefs. Feeding assays from the third study documented that two herbivorous fish species were potential biological control agents for managing alien algae. These fish can achieve different objectives in an effort to manage alien algae. Acanthurus triostegus is suited to control attached populations, Kyphosus vaigiensis is crucial in reducing dispersal by fragments. Results from this dissertation show that nutrient concentrations enter the near shore environment quite rapidly on Hawaii. With sustainable land use practices and increasing herbivore pressure by enhancing select herbivore species, we can improve the resilience of Hawaiian reefs and minimize the possibility of phase shifts.

Subjects/Keywords: Phase shifts have occurred on tropical reefs throughout the world. In Hawaii; phase shifts have been attributed to eutrophication; herbivore reduction; and alien algae. The first study from this dissertation examines the environmental relationships of Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD); a likely source of anthropogenic nutrients to Hawaii‟s reefs. The second study analyzes the relative and simultaneous effects of nutrient enrichment and reduced herbivory on algal succession in contrast to control conditions. The third study assesses the potential of indigenous herbivorous fish to control alien algae. The fine scale salinity profiles in the first study established differences between the average salinity values of three sample events; and correlations between SGD and low tide and; SGD and depth. Water quality samples displayed correlations with SGD and concentrations of numerous chemical constituents. Nitrate from water quality samples at Waiopae were up to 3.8 times greater than samples from upland wells suggesting that anthropogenic sources of nitrate are intruding the aquifer. This study exemplifies the dynamics of SGD and nutrient intrusion. Results from the second study in Kealakekua Bay show that the effects of nutrient enrichment were minor; herbivore reduction were considerable; and nutrient enrichment combined with herbivore reduction were major in governing algal biomass and cover. Coralline crustose algae dominated surfaces under control and nutrient enrichment. In herbivore reduction treatments turf algae dominated. Nutrient enrichment had a greater effect at one site; and herbivore reduction had a greater effect at another site; demonstrating that a single solution may not be equally effective for all Hawaiian reefs. Feeding assays from the third study documented that two herbivorous fish species were potential biological control agents for managing alien algae. These fish can achieve different objectives in an effort to manage alien algae. Acanthurus triostegus is suited to control attached populations; Kyphosus vaigiensis is crucial in reducing dispersal by fragments. Results from this dissertation show that nutrient concentrations enter the near shore environment quite rapidly on Hawaii. With sustainable land use practices and increasing herbivore pressure by enhancing select herbivore species; we can improve the resilience of Hawaiian reefs and minimize the possibility of phase shifts.

…correlate with depth, for example on the west coast of Barbados (Lewis 1987). The… …negative relation of SGD to distance from shore and depth in estuarine settings may exist because… …surface or a negative relationship between salinity and depth, at least for the top layer of the… …resolution of depth profiles and transects that run perpendicular to shore are dependent on 7… …between ~5 – 200 m, 3 – 22 m, and ~50 m respectively, while surface samples were in depth of 0… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Okano, R. L. (2016). Potential influences of submarine groundwater discharge, nutrients, and herbivory on Hawaiian reef algae. (Thesis). University of Hawaii – Manoa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101747

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Okano, Ryan L. “Potential influences of submarine groundwater discharge, nutrients, and herbivory on Hawaiian reef algae.” 2016. Thesis, University of Hawaii – Manoa. Accessed February 27, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101747.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Okano, Ryan L. “Potential influences of submarine groundwater discharge, nutrients, and herbivory on Hawaiian reef algae.” 2016. Web. 27 Feb 2021.

Vancouver:

Okano RL. Potential influences of submarine groundwater discharge, nutrients, and herbivory on Hawaiian reef algae. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Hawaii – Manoa; 2016. [cited 2021 Feb 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101747.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Okano RL. Potential influences of submarine groundwater discharge, nutrients, and herbivory on Hawaiian reef algae. [Thesis]. University of Hawaii – Manoa; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101747

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.