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You searched for subject:(deal design). Showing records 1 – 4 of 4 total matches.

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Stockholm University

1. Farahmand, Mohammad Rohani. Explaining the Iran Nuclear Deal : A Case of Mutual Agreement After a Decade of Gridlock.

Degree: Political Science, 2016, Stockholm University

Subjects/Keywords: Nuclear deal; Rational Choice; ripeness; deal design; mutually hurting stalemate (MHS); ZOPA-model.; Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies); Statsvetenskap (exklusive studier av offentlig förvaltning och globaliseringsstudier)

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APA (6th Edition):

Farahmand, M. R. (2016). Explaining the Iran Nuclear Deal : A Case of Mutual Agreement After a Decade of Gridlock. (Thesis). Stockholm University. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-137871

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farahmand, Mohammad Rohani. “Explaining the Iran Nuclear Deal : A Case of Mutual Agreement After a Decade of Gridlock.” 2016. Thesis, Stockholm University. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-137871.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farahmand, Mohammad Rohani. “Explaining the Iran Nuclear Deal : A Case of Mutual Agreement After a Decade of Gridlock.” 2016. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Farahmand MR. Explaining the Iran Nuclear Deal : A Case of Mutual Agreement After a Decade of Gridlock. [Internet] [Thesis]. Stockholm University; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-137871.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Farahmand MR. Explaining the Iran Nuclear Deal : A Case of Mutual Agreement After a Decade of Gridlock. [Thesis]. Stockholm University; 2016. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:su:diva-137871

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Virginia Commonwealth University

2. Kampf, Raymond William. Fauxtopia.

Degree: MFA, Communication Arts & Design, 2004, Virginia Commonwealth University

 To all who come to this fictitious place:Welcome.Fauxtopia is your land. Here, age relives distorted memories of the past, and here, youth may savor the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: swindle; subterfuge; story; stooge; stereotype; stratagem; spurious; spiel; soft-soap; snow job; simulated; aspersion; adventure; artificial; anecdote; allegory; advertising; assumptions; belie; bluff; bogus; brainwash; calumniation; canard; cheat; chronicle; cliche; cliffhanger; con man; conceal; counterfeit; crooked deal; deceit; deception; disguise; dishonest; distort; double cross; ersatz; evangelism; exaggerate; fabrication; facade; fake; falsehood; fantasy; fib; fiction; flim flam; fool; folktale; forgery; frame up; fraudulence; fudge; gag; grifter; guile; guise; history; hoax; hokey; hype; hyperbole; knavery; legend; likeness; make believe; malign; mask; memoir; misrepresentation; mockery; myth; parable; parody; performance; perjury; phony; placebo; player; ploy; potboiler; prevarication; propaganda; publicity; puppet; put-on; quasi; record; reproduction; romance; routine; ruse; saga; scam; shtick; semblance; sequel; show; serial; synthetic; tall story; trick; unnatural; untruth; veneer; verisimilitude; white lie; whopper; Disney; politics; hyper reality; theme park; entertainment; Art and Design; Arts and Humanities

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APA (6th Edition):

Kampf, R. W. (2004). Fauxtopia. (Thesis). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.25772/GT2Y-Z437 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/749

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kampf, Raymond William. “Fauxtopia.” 2004. Thesis, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed March 04, 2021. https://doi.org/10.25772/GT2Y-Z437 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/749.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kampf, Raymond William. “Fauxtopia.” 2004. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kampf RW. Fauxtopia. [Internet] [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2004. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/GT2Y-Z437 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/749.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kampf RW. Fauxtopia. [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2004. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/GT2Y-Z437 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/749

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Harvard University

3. Kappy, Brandon Joshua. Beyond the BATNA: Negotiation Training for a Complex World.

Degree: Doctor of Medicine, 2017, Harvard University

Today’s world is more complex than ever before. Negotiations that were once focused on one or two isolated issues now encompass multiple sectors and an… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Today’s world is more complex than ever before. Negotiations that were once focused on one or two isolated issues now encompass multiple sectors and an increasing number of parties. Negotiators must constantly make decisions based on uncertain and changing information – decisions that often have irreversible impacts on relationships and deal outcomes. Training policymakers; business leaders; and nonprofits to negotiate in an evolving 21st century has never been more important or challenging. Dragonfly Negotiations & Consulting is a client-based company that works with organizations in order to impart negotiation and leadership skills. Dragonfly provides training for clients that are focused on advancing social change within their respective fields – organizations that are often operating on the cutting edge of complicated social policies. Dragonfly; along with the vast majority of other negotiation consulting firms and academic negotiation courses; primarily relies on simulations to teach negotiation skills and lessons. Simulations; a form of experiential learning; are particularly prevalent in negotiation training given the important role that soft skills and social processes play in mastering the field. Yet despite the increase in complexity found in today’s realworld negotiations; simulations have failed to similarly evolve. This report seeks to answer how Dragonfly can best design and implement simulations that teach its clients to negotiate in an exceedingly complicated world. In order to do so; a gap-analysis of presently available simulations was performed; derived by creating a framework that isolated the architectural components found in different types of negotiation simulations. These findings indicate that though a substantial number of simulations involve multiple parties and nonscorable interests; very few simulations contain the dynamic complexity of real-world negotiations. To form recommendations for how Dragonfly can design future complex simulations; the unique features of real-world negotiations were identified and combined with pedagogical theories deconstructed from existing simulations. Supplementing these recommendations; this report provides a proposed simulation example that incorporates a new; complex design; as well as potential criteria to evaluate the success of future simulations. To assist Dragonfly in implementing these recommendations; a barriers analysis was conducted to help overcome potential issues.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kappy, B. J. (2017). Beyond the BATNA: Negotiation Training for a Complex World. (Doctoral Dissertation). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:40621384

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kappy, Brandon Joshua. “Beyond the BATNA: Negotiation Training for a Complex World.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:40621384.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kappy, Brandon Joshua. “Beyond the BATNA: Negotiation Training for a Complex World.” 2017. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kappy BJ. Beyond the BATNA: Negotiation Training for a Complex World. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Harvard University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:40621384.

Council of Science Editors:

Kappy BJ. Beyond the BATNA: Negotiation Training for a Complex World. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Harvard University; 2017. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:40621384

4. Tay, Noel Nuo Wi. Human-centric Semantic Reasoning and Optimization for Smart Home : スマートホームのための人間中心セマンティック推論と最適化.

Degree: 博士(工学), 2017, Tokyo Metropolitan University / 首都大学東京

首都大学東京, 2017-03-25, 博士(工学)

Subjects/Keywords: Smart home consists of various kinds of Internet of Tings (IoT) devices connected to the private house that cooperatively provide inhabitants (users) with proactive services related to comfort; security and safety. Examples of services include 1) manipulation of lighting and temperature based on time and context; 2) reminder service of user’s schedules by using the nearest output device; and 3) device organization to realize surveillance system. However; current smart homes are developed mostly from the viewpoint of technical capabilities; where users have to decide how the connected devices are going to serve them. They may have to setup the devices based on the available functionalities and specifications of the devices; and also have to alter their living styles according to the role of each device. Besides; most devices can only provide simple services independently. Œus; cooperation among the devices is important. On the other hand; human-centric approach; which centered on humans’ need to enhance their living experience; is an important technological paradigm where services are provided anywhere and anytime based on situation. Smart home abiding this approach should cooperatively maximize fulfillment of quality of life (QOL) for individual users subject to personal constraints. In this respect; the devices are bound to enable communication of information; and their operations are coordinated to deliver services cooperatively via a sequence of device actions called a plan. Due to personalization and automation; a number of problems have to be solved. First; a means of automatic binding between loosely coupled devices depending on services delivered have to be devised; as manual setup is impractical. Secondly; coordination of devices needs to generate complex plans; without requiring manual specification of sub-plans. Besides; issue of over-constrained goals during service provisions that arises from flawed or contradicting specification from multiple users should be considered. Apart from that; low training data in general environment setting for individual identification should be addressed. The aim of this research is to establish an integrated system for the human-centric smart home (HcSH) that provides personalized service through loosely coupled devices automatically. This research modularizes the overall system into three modules; which are human identification (HIM); automated planner (APM); and semantic reasoner (SRM). HIM helps select the appropriate QOL; SRM binds the devices by associating them with planning components; which are then used by APM to generate plans for device coordination to maximize QOL fulfillment. Chapter 1 gives the introduction and design motivation. Chapter 2 presents the related works and literature reviews; as well as justifications relevant to this thesis. Chapter 3 deals with HIM; which is realized via face identification. For face identification; problems faced are heavy computational load and insufficient learning data. The solution is to use transfer learning to handle data issue while being able to build generalized face model. For face model refinement; active learning is implemented. Experimental results show the method is competitive in terms of accuracy and computational cost compared to current state of the art. Chapter 4 presents APM; where planning via solving Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) is laid out. CSP in planning is declarative without requiring prior specification of sub-plans; and can handle variables of larger domains. Due to the high possibility of having over-constrained QOL as in practical cases; CSP planner cannot fulfill all of them. An example is a contradicting TV channel request from 2 persons. Optimization through weighted CSP is therefore used to maximize QOL fulfillment. Experiments on weighted CSP shows that the method is capable of performing optimization while generating complex plans. Chapter 5 is on SRM; where knowledge representation is constructed by Web Ontology Language (OWL) description logic. It models knowledge on home and building layout and device functionalities. OWL is used because it is decidable and that it is endorsed by World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). We deal with case studies based on further inference on building state as an important example to discuss the applicability of the proposed method; and demonstrate the use of building ontology. This is followed by automated device binding and the method to generate basic planning components of rules in automated planning. Finally; an extension to robot complex planning is provided to demonstrate how it can be easily extended. Chapter 6 demonstrates the applicability of the HcSH; which integrates all three modules through its implementation in a prototype smart home with 5 rooms; which houses 2 persons. Various tests are performed to show the generated plans are near optimal without redundancy. Œe system is also shown to be scalable given increasing amount of devices. Case studies show that the system can perform well even under short time threshold. Finally; chapter 7 summarizes the thesis. Future vision of the work is also laid out; which is to implement it as a community-centric system.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tay, N. N. W. (2017). Human-centric Semantic Reasoning and Optimization for Smart Home : スマートホームのための人間中心セマンティック推論と最適化. (Thesis). Tokyo Metropolitan University / 首都大学東京. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10748/00009960

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tay, Noel Nuo Wi. “Human-centric Semantic Reasoning and Optimization for Smart Home : スマートホームのための人間中心セマンティック推論と最適化.” 2017. Thesis, Tokyo Metropolitan University / 首都大学東京. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10748/00009960.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tay, Noel Nuo Wi. “Human-centric Semantic Reasoning and Optimization for Smart Home : スマートホームのための人間中心セマンティック推論と最適化.” 2017. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Tay NNW. Human-centric Semantic Reasoning and Optimization for Smart Home : スマートホームのための人間中心セマンティック推論と最適化. [Internet] [Thesis]. Tokyo Metropolitan University / 首都大学東京; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10748/00009960.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tay NNW. Human-centric Semantic Reasoning and Optimization for Smart Home : スマートホームのための人間中心セマンティック推論と最適化. [Thesis]. Tokyo Metropolitan University / 首都大学東京; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10748/00009960

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.