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You searched for subject:(cumulic). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Oklahoma State University

1. Kelley, John Phillip. Influence of Alluvial Sedimentation Rate on Floodplain Soil Developement and Vegetation.

Degree: Environmental Sciences Program, 2006, Oklahoma State University

The purpose of this study was to evaluate soil forming and sedimentary processes responsible for the formation of two key paleosols in the Southern Plains (the Caddo and Copan Soil). Vertical trends in organic carbon content and clay-free particle size distribution were used to delineate sedimentary events and evaluate subsequent soil forming processes. Systematic changes in clay-free particle size and organic carbon content distribution with depth revealed sedimentary sequences throughout profiles, as well as, cumulic and pachic soil formation within thick mollic A horizons of buried soils. The purpose of this study was to evaluate established herbaceous plant community response to burial by sedimentation and to serve as a pilot study for future studies of this kind. Sediment burial depths of 8, 16 and 24 cm were applied to established herbaceous plant plots in the spring. Percent plant coverage by species was then evaluated during the following growing season. Sediment burial depths of 8, 16 and 24 cm had no effect on percent coverage of pre-existing forb species. While, burial depths of 8, 16 and 24 cm killed almost all pre-existing grass species. Advisors/Committee Members: Carter, Brian J. (advisor), Hickman, Karen R. (committee member), Puckette, Jim (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: buried soil; cumulic; sedimentation; alluvium; vegetation; floodplain

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kelley, J. P. (2006). Influence of Alluvial Sedimentation Rate on Floodplain Soil Developement and Vegetation. (Thesis). Oklahoma State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/9559

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kelley, John Phillip. “Influence of Alluvial Sedimentation Rate on Floodplain Soil Developement and Vegetation.” 2006. Thesis, Oklahoma State University. Accessed August 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/9559.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kelley, John Phillip. “Influence of Alluvial Sedimentation Rate on Floodplain Soil Developement and Vegetation.” 2006. Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Kelley JP. Influence of Alluvial Sedimentation Rate on Floodplain Soil Developement and Vegetation. [Internet] [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2006. [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/9559.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kelley JP. Influence of Alluvial Sedimentation Rate on Floodplain Soil Developement and Vegetation. [Thesis]. Oklahoma State University; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/9559

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Utah State University

2. Badamchian, Behjat. The Accuracy of Soil Mapping Units of Certain Pachic and Cumulic Soils in Northern Utah.

Degree: MS, Plants, Soils, and Climate, 1976, Utah State University

The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of mapping of pachic and cumulic soils in Cache County. The soil maps that were used for this study as the basemap were the Atlas sheets of the published soil survey of Cache County. Five map units from Mendou, Nebeker, Avon, Hendricks and Winn which include almost 52 percent of the pachic and cumulic soils in the survey area were selected for this study. These five soils cover large areas when compared to other soil series and they are distributed throughout the county. All these map units were recognized as pachic and cumulic in the published soil survey report. The thickness of the epipedon was therefore selected as the principal criterion for determining the accuracy of the map units. About 400 samples from the major delineations were studied in the field and the necessary data were collected and interpreted statistically in order to find: (1) the accuracy of each map unit, (2) the inclusions, misclassified and not classified pedons and their proportions, and (3) the estimated thickness of the epipedons. Attempts were made to select the pedons on transects with appropriate interval, depending on landforms and continuity of soils. Statistical interpretations were conducted by using the chi-square method. The results for each map units are as follows: for Mendon map unit (MeA) 42-56 percent and for Hendricks map unit (HdD) only 30-60 percent of the samples have characteristics required for the named soil in these map units. These values are less than 75 percent which is the critical value for the map units by definition. It is concluded therefore that with the available data the Mendon and Hendricks series have been mapped incorrectly. For Nebeker map unit (NbE) 77-93 percent and from Avon map unit (ArA) 85-99 percent of the samples have the characteristics required for the named soil in the map units. These values are more than the critical value (75) so it is concluded that with available data the Nebeker and Avon series have been mapped correctly. For Winn map unit (Wn) 54-82 percent of the samples have the required characteristics of this series. The statistical analysis did not reveal strictly whether the pedons are mapped correctly or not and additional samples are required to adequately test the accuracy of the Winn map unit. It is concluded that in Cache County the influence of different geologic depositions and variations in topography are two major factors responsible for poor accuracy in mapping the Mendon and Hendricks series. Advisors/Committee Members: Alvin R. Southard, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: accuracy; soil; mapping; units; certain; pachic; cumulic; soils; northern; utah; Soil Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Badamchian, B. (1976). The Accuracy of Soil Mapping Units of Certain Pachic and Cumulic Soils in Northern Utah. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3437

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Badamchian, Behjat. “The Accuracy of Soil Mapping Units of Certain Pachic and Cumulic Soils in Northern Utah.” 1976. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed August 18, 2019. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3437.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Badamchian, Behjat. “The Accuracy of Soil Mapping Units of Certain Pachic and Cumulic Soils in Northern Utah.” 1976. Web. 18 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Badamchian B. The Accuracy of Soil Mapping Units of Certain Pachic and Cumulic Soils in Northern Utah. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 1976. [cited 2019 Aug 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3437.

Council of Science Editors:

Badamchian B. The Accuracy of Soil Mapping Units of Certain Pachic and Cumulic Soils in Northern Utah. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 1976. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3437

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