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You searched for subject:(critical node analysis). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Hopkins, Michael. Critical Node Analysis for Water Distribution System Using Flow Distribution.

Degree: MS, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2012, Cal Poly

The expansive nature of water distribution system makes them susceptible to threats such as natural disasters and man-made destructions. Vulnerability assessment research efforts have increased since the passing of “Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act” in 2002 to harden WDS. This study aimed to develop a method that locates critical nodes without hydraulic analysis of every failure scenario, applicable for any size WDS, incorporates critical infrastructure, and capable of verifying method accuracy. The Flow Distribution method is the application of the gravity model, typically used to predict traffic flows in transportation engineering, to a distribution system. Flow distribution predicts the amount of demand and population that would be affected if any node in the system were disabled by solving for the distribution of each node’s outflow. Flow Distribution is applied to the hypothetical city, Anytown, USA using the computer simulation program WaterCAD to model two different disaster scenarios. Results were verified by analyzing sixteen failure scenarios (one for each node) to measure the actual demand and population effect, which was then compared to the nodes predicted by Flow Distribution. Flow Distribution predicted the critical nodes with 70% accuracy and can still be improved with future work. Advisors/Committee Members: Shihka Rahman.

Subjects/Keywords: Water distribution system; vulnerability assessment; critical node analysis; gravity model; flow distribution

…pipe’s flow. This analysis was performed on a simple network and the critical pipes were… …for the analysis. This method demonstrates that population and critical infrastructure can… …analysis used defines every node as either no-flow, partial flow (pressures between Hmin… …46 Table 9: Top Critical Nodes Predicted by Flow Distribution… …Commission on Critical Infrastructure as one of the eight key infrastructures (Qiao et at… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hopkins, M. (2012). Critical Node Analysis for Water Distribution System Using Flow Distribution. (Masters Thesis). Cal Poly. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/722 ; 10.15368/theses.2012.38

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hopkins, Michael. “Critical Node Analysis for Water Distribution System Using Flow Distribution.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Cal Poly. Accessed March 08, 2021. https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/722 ; 10.15368/theses.2012.38.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hopkins, Michael. “Critical Node Analysis for Water Distribution System Using Flow Distribution.” 2012. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Hopkins M. Critical Node Analysis for Water Distribution System Using Flow Distribution. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Cal Poly; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/722 ; 10.15368/theses.2012.38.

Council of Science Editors:

Hopkins M. Critical Node Analysis for Water Distribution System Using Flow Distribution. [Masters Thesis]. Cal Poly; 2012. Available from: https://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/theses/722 ; 10.15368/theses.2012.38


Queensland University of Technology

2. Koschade, Stuart Andrew. The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context.

Degree: 2007, Queensland University of Technology

The rise of the 21st Century Islamic extremist movement, which was mobilised by the al-Qaeda attacks of and responses to September 11, 2001, heralds a new period in the history of terrorism. The increased frequency and intensity of this type of terrorism affects every nation in the world, not least Australia. Rising to meet the challenges posed by terrorism is the field of terrorism studies, the field which aims at understanding, explaining, and countering terrorism. Despite the importance of the field, it has been beleaguered with criticisms since its inception as a response to the rise of international terrorism. These criticisms specifically aim at the field's lack of objectivity, abstraction, levels of research, and levels of analysis. These criticisms were the impetus behind the adoption of the methodology of this thesis, which offers the distinct ability to understand, explain, and forecast the way in which terrorists interact within covert cells. Through social network analysis, this thesis examines four terrorist cells that have operated in or against Australia. These cells are from the groups Hrvatsko Revolucionarno Bratstvo (Croatian Revolutionary Brotherhood), Aum Shinrikyo (Supreme Truth), Lashkar-e-Taiba (Army of the Pure), and Jemaah Islamiyah (Islamic Community) and operated between 1963 and 2003. Essentially, this methodology attempts to discover, map, and analyse the interaction within the cells during the covert stage of their respective operations. Following this, the results are analysed through the traditional social network analysis frameworks to discover the internal dynamics of the cell and identify the critical nodes (leaders) within the cells. Destabilisation techniques are subsequently employed, targeting these critical nodes to establish the most effective disruption techniques from a counter-terrorism point of view. The major findings of this thesis are: (1) that cells with a focus on efficiency rather than covertness were more successful in completing their objectives (contrary to popular belief); and (2) betweenness centrality (control over the flow of communication) is a critical factor in identifying leaders within terrorist cells. The analysis also offered significant insight into how a Jemaah Islamiyah cell might operate effectively in Australia, as well as the importance of local contacts to terrorist operations and the significance of international counter-terrorism cooperation and coordination.

Subjects/Keywords: terrorism; terrorist cells; terrorism studies; social network analysis; Croatian Revolutionary Brotherhood; Ustashi; Ustasha; Aum Shinrikyo; Lashkar-e-Taiba; Jemaah Islamiyah; history of terrorism; Australia; destabilisation techniques; betweenness; critical node; counter-terrorism; Willie Brigitte; Faheem Khalid Lodhi; Shoko Asahara; Imam Samudra; Muklas; Bali bombing; Islamic extremism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Koschade, S. A. (2007). The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koschade, Stuart Andrew. “The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context.” 2007. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed March 08, 2021. https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koschade, Stuart Andrew. “The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context.” 2007. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Koschade SA. The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2007. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Koschade SA. The internal dynamics of terrorist cells: a social network analysis of terrorist cells in an Australian context. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2007. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16591/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.