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You searched for subject:(criminal associates). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rutgers University

1. Saad, Marina K., 1991-. Exploring the consequences of relationships with offenders: evidence of implicit criminal self-expansion.

Degree: PhD, Desistance, 2019, Rutgers University

Close relationships can influence one’s idea of who they are. Close relationships in which people engage in frequent and positive experiences with each other can lead people to associate with the social groups that belong to the other person. This process can occur both implicitly, or automatically and explicitly, or consciously. The overarching goals of this doctoral dissertation research are to test whether direct relationships and indirect experiences with criminals leads individuals to implicitly and/or explicitly associate with the social group criminal, and to examine the conditions under which implicit and explicit associations with the group criminal may be strengthened. Across three studies, including two experimental studies, this dissertation tests the general hypotheses that participants who have either direct relationships or indirect experiences with offenders will exhibit stronger implicit, but not explicit associations with the group criminal compared to those without such relationships, and; that among participants who have relationships with offenders, participants who are reminded of their past positive experiences will exhibit stronger implicit but not explicit associations with the group criminal compared to participants who are not reminded of such experiences. These hypotheses will be tested across three samples of non-criminal people who have relationships with offenders. Study 1 utilizes a sample of friends and family members of offenders, Study 2 utilizes a sample of parole officers, and Study 3 utilizes a sample of criminal justice students. Results showed that among participants who had personal relationships with offenders, participants who were reminded of a past experience, regardless of the type of reminder, and felt close to an offender exhibited stronger implicit associations with the group criminal in comparison to participants who were not reminded of a past experience. Further, parole officers who were reminded of positive experiences exhibited stronger implicit associations with the group criminal in comparison to those who were reminded of negative experiences. Collectively, this dissertation research may support efforts to improve relationships between non-criminal others and offenders and improve the overall well-being of non-criminal others who have relationships with offenders. In addition, this research may also support efforts to create relationships which facilitate desistance.

Advisors/Committee Members: Veysey, Bonita M. (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Criminal Justice; Criminals  – Friends and associates

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Saad, Marina K., 1. (2019). Exploring the consequences of relationships with offenders: evidence of implicit criminal self-expansion. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60552/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Saad, Marina K., 1991-. “Exploring the consequences of relationships with offenders: evidence of implicit criminal self-expansion.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed January 26, 2020. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60552/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Saad, Marina K., 1991-. “Exploring the consequences of relationships with offenders: evidence of implicit criminal self-expansion.” 2019. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Saad, Marina K. 1. Exploring the consequences of relationships with offenders: evidence of implicit criminal self-expansion. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60552/.

Council of Science Editors:

Saad, Marina K. 1. Exploring the consequences of relationships with offenders: evidence of implicit criminal self-expansion. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2019. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/60552/


Texas Tech University

2. -3729-7368. Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates.

Degree: PhD, Psychology - Clinical, 2017, Texas Tech University

Suicide is a significant concern among psychiatric inpatients. The interpersonal theory of suicide may provide a theoretical lens through which to conceptualize suicide ideation within this group. This theory posits that thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness are risk factors for suicide ideation. The theory also suggests that thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness are related, yet distinct constructs. That is, although perceived burdensomeness requires one to have relationships on which to feel a burden, these relationships may not always fulfill the need to belong; thus, thwarted belongingness may still be experienced. Given this, it would be expected that as one experiences greater perceived social support, he or she would report less thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Individuals who engage with criminal associates (i.e., individuals one knows who participate in crime) may experience poor relationship quality, which may increase psychological distress. Therefore, the association between perceived social support, thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and distress due to suicide ideation may be stronger among those with greater involvement with criminal associates. It was hypothesized that perceived social support would be negatively associated with thwarted belongingness (H1) and perceived burdensomeness (H2), and these associations would be magnified among those with greater involvement with criminal associates. Additionally, it was hypothesized that thwarted belongingness (H3) and perceived burdensomeness (H4) would be positively associated with distress due to suicide ideation, and these associations would be magnified among those with greater involvement with criminal associates. Participants were 142 psychiatric inpatients who completed assessments of perceived social support, perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, depressive symptoms, hopelessness, involvement with criminal associates, and distress due to suicide ideation. Ordinary least squares regression, ordinal logistic regression, and multinomial logistic regression were used to test the hypotheses. The results indicated perceived social support was significantly negatively associated with thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Additionally, thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness were significantly associated with greater odds of experiencing distress due to suicide ideation. Contrary to the hypotheses, these associations did not vary based on involvement with criminal associates. The models were also tested when adjusting for depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Implications and limitations are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Alquist, Jessica L. (committee member), Littlefield, Andrew K. (committee member), Morgan, Robert D. (committee member), Cukrowicz, Kelly C. (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: suicide ideation; criminal associates; social support; thwarted belongingness; perceived burdensomeness; psychiatric inpatients

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-3729-7368. (2017). Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74404

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-3729-7368. “Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas Tech University. Accessed January 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74404.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-3729-7368. “Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates.” 2017. Web. 26 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-3729-7368. Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas Tech University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74404.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-3729-7368. Perceived social support, thwarted interpersonal needs, and distress due to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients: The moderating effects of criminal associates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas Tech University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/74404

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

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