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You searched for subject:(covenant renewal). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Jackson, Kody Sherman. Jesus, Jung, and the Charismatics : the Pecos Benedictines and visions of religious renewal.

Degree: MA, History, 2018, University of Texas – Austin

The Catholic Charismatic Renewal, though changing the face and feel of U.S. Catholicism, has received relatively little scholarly attention. Beginning in 1967 and peaking in the mid-1970s, the Renewal brought Pentecostal practices (speaking in tongues, faith healings, prophecy, etc.) into mainstream Catholicism. This thesis seeks to explore the Renewal on the national, regional, and individual level, with particular attention to lay and religious “covenant communities.” These groups of Catholics (and sometimes Protestants) devoted themselves to spreading Pentecostal practices amongst their brethren, sponsoring retreats, authoring pamphlets, and organizing conferences. With religious communities, especially, this was a controversial practice, causing tension amongst Catholic celibates and ultimately discouraging religious involvement. To promote something, however, is often to have very clear visions about what that thing should look like. The Renewal was no exception, as covenant communities like the Word of God (Ann Arbor, MI) and the People of Praise (South Bend, IN) endorsed a particularly rigid and authoritarian version of the Catholic Charismatic Renewal. Clerical groups, most notably the Pecos Benedictine Monastery, advanced a different vision of the Charismatic life. Their version of the Renewal, more heavily based on inner healing and (for Pecos at least) Jungian psychology, was much looser and similar to other New Age spiritualities. At the core, those at Pecos believed in the redemption of man through Christ, whereas those in lay covenant communities tended to focus on the fall of Adam and original sin. These visions came into conflict in the structures and messages of the Renewal, which helped contribute to its decline in the 1980s and practical disappearance by the 1990s. Advisors/Committee Members: Abzug, Robert H. (advisor), Garrard-Burnett, Virginia (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Catholic Charismatic Renewal; Catholic clergy; Covenant communities; Catholic history; Catholic theology; United States Catholicism; Pecos Benedictine Monastery; Jungian psychology; Pentecostal practices

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jackson, K. S. (2018). Jesus, Jung, and the Charismatics : the Pecos Benedictines and visions of religious renewal. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68241

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jackson, Kody Sherman. “Jesus, Jung, and the Charismatics : the Pecos Benedictines and visions of religious renewal.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68241.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jackson, Kody Sherman. “Jesus, Jung, and the Charismatics : the Pecos Benedictines and visions of religious renewal.” 2018. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Jackson KS. Jesus, Jung, and the Charismatics : the Pecos Benedictines and visions of religious renewal. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68241.

Council of Science Editors:

Jackson KS. Jesus, Jung, and the Charismatics : the Pecos Benedictines and visions of religious renewal. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68241


Vanderbilt University

2. Christian, Mark Alan. Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation.

Degree: PhD, Religion, 2011, Vanderbilt University

This project offers comprehensive theory to explain the origin of certain Pentateuchal passages that though few in number contrast sharply with the dominant traditions regarding the divine revelation at Mt. Sinai/Horeb. In the exegetical analyses of the germane passages, literary-historical and redactional models have been brought to bear and situated within the current international Pentateuchal debate. The research has both confirmed problems with wide-ranging redactional models and affirmed their necessity in explaining complex interweaving of contrasting viewpoints. Traditional notions of Pentateuchal authorship have left unsolved literary and literary-historical problems, especially with respect to the developmental stages apparent in the book of Deuteronomy, a text of critical importance for this study. This dissertation has explored the connections between the prophetically linked tradition of the Plenary Reception of Revelation (PRR; Israelites received direct, unmediated revelation from God as a community) and non-elite levitical priest-prophets based outside of urban centers. The research has shown that they supported this tradition and negotiated with elite priestly supporters of the dominant tradition (the Israelite community did not receive direct but rather mediated divine revelation) in behalf of its survival among the received tradition. In addition to literary analyses, the application of social (including archaeological), political, and legal theories have revealed a close working relationship between these Levites and lay leaders. Through their involvement in the making of Israelite literature, Levites saw to the inclusion of marginalized, âpopularâ traditions in the Hebrew Bible, which otherwise comprises a repository of traditions that affirms âofficialâ perspectives. I have found the following âpopularâ traditions advocated by the Levites to be closely interconnected: the PRR, positive and perhaps repeated experiences of direct encounter with the divine, an expansive notion of Israelite sanctification, and a pronounced openness to alien integration. My research has provided a window through which both the scholars and general readers of the Hebrew Bible can better view the contributions of local, non-elite priests and their lay constituents to the culture and religion of ancient Israel. Advisors/Committee Members: Douglas A. Knight (chair), Jack M. Sasson (committee member), Annalisa Azzoni (committee member), Robert Drews (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: H; P; priestly code; torot; torah; theocratic; theocracy; redaction; redactional; priest; prophet; prophecy; priestly; elohist; Israel; Israelite priesthood; Israelite cult; priest-prophet; lay priests; quasi-priest; Verschriftung; Bearbeitung; Isaiah; Nehemiah; Leviticus; Holiness Code; Foucault; openness to the other; alien; theology; sociopolitical; political; theophany; Sinai; Horeb; Kings; sovereign; mountain of god; Yhwh; Elohim; Yahweh; Jhwh; Jesus; kumr; kmr; PRR; Phoenicia; Mesopotamia; Egypt; Persia; Persian period; Achaemenid; Achaemenid period; Neo-Babylonian; translate; translator; priestly power that empowers; reading tobit backwards and forwards; in search of halakhah; revisiting levitical authorship; hexateuch; pentateuch; enneateuch; decalogue; ten commandments; Aaron; aaronide; Zadok; zadokite; Moses; Mosegestalt; Josiah; Hezekiah; David; purity; impurity; sacerdotal; sacral; law; legal; instruction; residential cities; urban; rural; elite; Bethel; Jerusalem; Ezra; Isaiah; Deutero-Isaiah; Third Isaiah; Chronicles; Chronicler; corpus propheticum; ideology; HexRed; PentRed; School of Hexateuch redaction; School of HexRed; Deuteronomy; Deuteronomistic History; preexile; preexilic; exile; exilic; postexilic; Hellenistic; LXX; septuagint; targum; rabbi; rabbinic; priestly authorship; mosaic office; mosaic institution; covenant code; Deuteronomic code; law code; post-P; post-dtr; dtrD; Moab covenant; Horeb covenant; Sinai covenant; exodus; hebrew; greek; aramaic; tradent; iron age; bronze age; tribe; tribal; Assyrian; Akkadian; Sumerian; ancient near east; near eastern; Elephantine; kemarim; oral law; orality; Hosea; Judges; Ezekiel; Ezek 44; Exod 19; Isa 56; Jeremiah; Baruch; religious functionaries; cultic personnel; priestly personnel; foreign; contaminate; Auseinandersetzung; elders; female prophets; female prophecy; prophetess; priestess; village; Judah; yehud; judahite; northern Israel; administrative cities; northern kingdom; southern kingdom; Zion; psalms; psalter; Joshua; law of the king; D; liturgy; liturgical; enoch; fear; fear of the Lord; popular religion; official religion; middle-tier; middle-tier priests; Herrschaftswissen; levitism; Gattung; levitizing; levitisierung; Le jeu de persuasion; rhetoric; rhetorical persuasion; clergy; Samaritan Pentateuch; Zadokite-Levites; Aaronide-Levites; Book of Numbers; mediate; mediator; mediation; intermediary; Yahwistic; covenant renewal; diaspora; Offenbarung; benei yisrael; Landnahmeerzählung; Landnahme; Cultic competence; prophetic Competence; kingship; monarchy; Israelite monarchy; power network; high priest; socioreligious; centralization of the cult; mid-level priest; mid-level priests; second-level functionaries; second-level priest; residential cities; administrative cities; condensation of revelatory events; torah; torot

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Christian, M. A. (2011). Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12012011-135559/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Christian, Mark Alan. “Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12012011-135559/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Christian, Mark Alan. “Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation.” 2011. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Christian MA. Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12012011-135559/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Christian MA. Levites and the Plenary Reception of Revelation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12012011-135559/ ;

.