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You searched for subject:(course taking patterns). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Ohio University

1. Mills, Sandra R. Mathematical Course-Taking Patterns of Hispanic Students at Public Two-Year Colleges and How These Patterns Affect Degree Attainment and Transfer.

Degree: PhD, Curriculum and Instruction Mathematics Education (Education), 2016, Ohio University

In 2009, President Barack Obama presented the American Graduation Initiative, vowing that America would lead the world in college degrees by 2020. Because the Hispanic population represents the largest minority group in the United States, this initiative is dependent upon the effective education of Hispanic Americans. Using data from the 2004–2009 cohort of the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study, this research examined the mathematics course-taking patterns of Hispanic and non-Hispanic community college students, determining the most common sequences taken as well as student success in these sequences. Through the use of student transcripts and sequence analysis, the research identified and sorted course-taking patterns into appropriate groups for study. Chi-square analysis showed that there is a significant relationship between mathematics course-taking patterns and whether the student is Hispanic. Specifically, most community college students, regardless of ethnicity, take only one course in mathematics, frequently at the precollege level.With regard to success, grade patterns were paired with the appropriate course-taking sequence and sorted according to frequency. The most common grade in the precollege class for Hispanics was an F, but for non-Hispanics it was a B. Logistic regression was then used to determine the transfer and degree attainment outcomes of Hispanic and non-Hispanic two-year college students based on their mathematics course-taking patterns. This study found that mathematics course-taking patterns do not affect transfer and degree attainment for Hispanics or non-Hispanics; however, other variables such as socioeconomic status, parental education, two-year college grade point average, and remedial class enrollment were found to have an effect on transfer and degree attainment.The outcomes of this study suggest a critical need for intervention through curricular reform, transitional programs, and support for certificate attainment in mathematics-related fields. This will require an extension of current programs as well as the development of new and innovative ones. If the United States is to lead the world in college degrees, the success of Hispanic community college students is increasingly vital. Advisors/Committee Members: Foley, Gregory (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Mathematics Education; Mathematics course-taking patterns; Hispanic two-year college students; degree attainment; transfer to four-year institutions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mills, S. R. (2016). Mathematical Course-Taking Patterns of Hispanic Students at Public Two-Year Colleges and How These Patterns Affect Degree Attainment and Transfer. (Doctoral Dissertation). Ohio University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1459338769

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mills, Sandra R. “Mathematical Course-Taking Patterns of Hispanic Students at Public Two-Year Colleges and How These Patterns Affect Degree Attainment and Transfer.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Ohio University. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1459338769.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mills, Sandra R. “Mathematical Course-Taking Patterns of Hispanic Students at Public Two-Year Colleges and How These Patterns Affect Degree Attainment and Transfer.” 2016. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mills SR. Mathematical Course-Taking Patterns of Hispanic Students at Public Two-Year Colleges and How These Patterns Affect Degree Attainment and Transfer. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Ohio University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1459338769.

Council of Science Editors:

Mills SR. Mathematical Course-Taking Patterns of Hispanic Students at Public Two-Year Colleges and How These Patterns Affect Degree Attainment and Transfer. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Ohio University; 2016. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1459338769

2. Proctor, Avis R. The Relationship between the Secondary Mathematics Curriculum, College Persistence, and Success at an Urban Community College.

Degree: Doctor of Education (EdD), Educational Administration and Supervision, 2011, Florida International University

According to Venezia, Kirst, and Antonio (2003) and Barth’s 2002 Thinking K16 Ticket to Nowhere report, the disconnect between K-12 and postsecondary education was a contributing factor to high attrition rates. Since mathematics emerged as a primary concern for college readiness, Barth (2002) called for improving student transitions from K-12 to postsecondary institutions through the use of state or local data. The purpose of the present study was to analyze mathematics course-taking patterns of secondary students in a local context and to evaluate high school characteristics in order to explore their relationships with Associate degree attainment or continuous enrollment at an urban community college. Also, this study extended a national study conducted by Clifford Adelman (The Toolbox Revisited, 2006) as it specifically focused on community college students that were not included his study. Furthermore, this study used the theoretical framework that human capital, social capital, and cultural capital influence habitus - an individual’s or a group’s learned inclination to behave within the parameters of the imposed prevailing culture and norms. Specifically, the school embedded culture as it relates to tracking worked as a reproduction tool of ultimate benefit for the privileged group (Oakes, 1994). Using multilevel analysis, this ex post facto study examined non-causal relationships between math course-taking patterns and college persistence of public high school graduates who enrolled at the local community college for up to 6 years. One school-level variable (percent of racial/ethnic minorities) and 7 student-level variables (community college math proportion, remedial math attempts, race, gender, first-year credits earned, socioeconomic status, and summer credits earned) emerged as predictors for college persistence. Study results indicated that students who enter higher education at the community college may have had lower opportunities to learn and therefore needed higher levels of remediation, which was shown to detract students from degree completion. Community college leaders are called to partner with local high schools with high percentages of racial/ethnic minorities to design academic programs aimed at improving the academic preparation of high school students in mathematics and promote student engagement during the first year and summers of college. Advisors/Committee Members: Glenda Droogsma Musoba, Benjamin Baez, Maria Fernandez, Roger Geertz Gonzalez.

Subjects/Keywords: persistence; mathematics; degree completion; course-taking patterns; education policy; equity; college readiness; tracking; developmental education; community college; multilevel analysis

…98 Step Six: Demographic/Family/Academic Backgrounds and Course-taking Patterns with High… …x29;, and course-taking patterns of students were examined for predictive relationships to… …higher education. The authors called for states to evaluate course-taking patterns of students… …where he found that there were within-school effects on tracking and course-taking patterns… …mathematics course enrollment patterns and degree attainment? Research Question 2: Is there a… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Proctor, A. R. (2011). The Relationship between the Secondary Mathematics Curriculum, College Persistence, and Success at an Urban Community College. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/531 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11120907 ; FI11120907

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Proctor, Avis R. “The Relationship between the Secondary Mathematics Curriculum, College Persistence, and Success at an Urban Community College.” 2011. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/531 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11120907 ; FI11120907.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Proctor, Avis R. “The Relationship between the Secondary Mathematics Curriculum, College Persistence, and Success at an Urban Community College.” 2011. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Proctor AR. The Relationship between the Secondary Mathematics Curriculum, College Persistence, and Success at an Urban Community College. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/531 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11120907 ; FI11120907.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Proctor AR. The Relationship between the Secondary Mathematics Curriculum, College Persistence, and Success at an Urban Community College. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2011. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/531 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11120907 ; FI11120907

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.