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You searched for subject:(coral algae interaction). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Hawaii

1. Sindorf, Victoria L. Patterns and Effects of Direct Contact Between Coral and Macroalgae on Shallow Reefs Around O‘ahu, Hawai‘i.

Degree: 2019, University of Hawaii

Subjects/Keywords: Coral reef ecology; macroalgae; competition; coral-algae interaction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sindorf, V. L. (2019). Patterns and Effects of Direct Contact Between Coral and Macroalgae on Shallow Reefs Around O‘ahu, Hawai‘i. (Thesis). University of Hawaii. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62517

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sindorf, Victoria L. “Patterns and Effects of Direct Contact Between Coral and Macroalgae on Shallow Reefs Around O‘ahu, Hawai‘i.” 2019. Thesis, University of Hawaii. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62517.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sindorf, Victoria L. “Patterns and Effects of Direct Contact Between Coral and Macroalgae on Shallow Reefs Around O‘ahu, Hawai‘i.” 2019. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Sindorf VL. Patterns and Effects of Direct Contact Between Coral and Macroalgae on Shallow Reefs Around O‘ahu, Hawai‘i. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Hawaii; 2019. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62517.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sindorf VL. Patterns and Effects of Direct Contact Between Coral and Macroalgae on Shallow Reefs Around O‘ahu, Hawai‘i. [Thesis]. University of Hawaii; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/62517

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Rasher, Douglas B. Chemically mediated competition, herbivory, and the structure of coral reefs.

Degree: PhD, Biology, 2012, Georgia Tech

Corals, the foundation species of tropical reefs, are in rapid global decline as a result of anthropogenic disturbance. On many reefs, losses of coral have coincided with the over-harvesting of reef herbivores, resulting in ecosystem phase-shifts from coral to macroalgal dominance. It is hypothesized that abundant macroalgae inhibit coral recovery and recruitment, thereby generating ecological feedback processes that reinforce phase-shifts to macroalgae and further diminish reef function. Notwithstanding, the extent to which macroalgae directly outcompete coral, the mechanisms involved, and the species-specificity of algal-coral competition remains debated. Moreover the capacity for herbivores to prevent vs. reverse ecosystem phase-shifts to macroalgae and the roles of herbivore diversity in such phenomena remain poorly understood. Here I demonstrate with a series of field experiments in the tropical Pacific and Caribbean Sea that multiple macroalgae common to degraded reefs directly outcompete coral using chemical warfare, that these interactions are mediated by hydrophobic secondary metabolites transferred from algal to coral surfaces by direct contact, and that the outcomes of these allelopathic interactions are highly species-specific. Using field observations and experiments in the tropical Pacific, I also demonstrate that the process of herbivory attenuates the competitive effects of allelopathic algae on corals by controlling succession of algal communities, and that the herbivore species responsible for macroalgal removal possess complementary tolerances to the diversity of chemical defenses deployed among algae, creating an essential role for herbivore diversity in reversing ecosystem phase-shifts to macroalgae. Lastly, I demonstrate with field experiments in the tropical Pacific that algal-coral competition simultaneously induces allelochemicals and suppresses anti-herbivore deterrents in some algae, likely due to trade-offs in the productions of defense metabolites with differing ecological functions. Together, these studies provide strong evidence that chemically mediated competitive and consumer-prey interactions play principal roles in coral reef degradation and recovery, and should provide resource managers with vital information needed for effective management of these ecologically and economically important but threatened ecosystems. Advisors/Committee Members: Hay, Mark (advisor), Duffy, Meghan (committee member), Jiang, Lin (committee member), Kubanek, Julia (committee member), Steneck, Robert (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Chemical ecology; Marine protected area; Coral reef; Phase-shift; Plant-herbivore interaction; Allelopathy; Biodiversity; Coral reef biology; Coral reef ecology; Algae; Allelopathy; Animal-plant relationships

…damicornis, relative to control algae lacking contact with coral (n = 7-11). Analyzed by… …in ~75% of the 39 interactions studied, and allelopathic effects of algae on coral were… …reefs, and limiting the negative effects of algae on coral. Finally, I demonstrate with field… …algae or attenuate algal effects on coral, thus altering the role of allelopathic algae in… …experimental corals in cones. (B) A coral replicate showing a seaweed transplanted against… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rasher, D. B. (2012). Chemically mediated competition, herbivory, and the structure of coral reefs. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/49019

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rasher, Douglas B. “Chemically mediated competition, herbivory, and the structure of coral reefs.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/49019.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rasher, Douglas B. “Chemically mediated competition, herbivory, and the structure of coral reefs.” 2012. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Rasher DB. Chemically mediated competition, herbivory, and the structure of coral reefs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/49019.

Council of Science Editors:

Rasher DB. Chemically mediated competition, herbivory, and the structure of coral reefs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/49019

3. Voss, Justin N. Coral recovery on phase-shifted reefs depend upon the type of macroalgae present.

Degree: 2016, Nova Southeastern University

The Florida Keys experienced some of the most drastic transitions from coral to macroalgae dominated states, known as phase-or regime-shifts, of any reefs in the Caribbean. Macroalgae on coral reefs lower coral recruitment by deterring coral settlement either directly through competition or indirectly by changing the chemical environment near the benthos. With evidence of species-specific interactions to coral-macroalgae competition, the type of macroalgae on a phase-shifted coral reef might be more important than just identifying a reef transition. To answer this question, I tested the effect of Laurencia intricata (a macroalgae related to the settlement inducing crustose coralline algae) and Dictyotaceae (known for its toxic or allelopathic compounds) on Porites astreoides planulae behavior, settlement and choice settlement preference, and post-settlement survival. I found that P. astreoides planulae show a positive response to chemical cues released from L. intricata, crustose coralline algae, and species in the Dictyotaceae family. However, the positive chemical cue response becomes algal-specific as larvae start probing for settlement substrate. Providing P. astreoides larvae with a choice between settlement substrates, revealed that the algal structure caused higher settlement next to L. intricata, while Dictyotaceae deterred larval settlement. It may be beneficial for larvae to settle next to L. intricata over Dictyotaceae algae. I identified that post-settlement survival was enhanced when P. astreoides larvae settled next to L. intricata while Dictyotaceae species did not enhance or deter post-settlement survival. These results indicate that coral larvae may be responding differently to a variety of chemical cues. Any chemical or physical cue from a reef may be used by coral larvae to identify and locate settlement substrate on a reef. Once they identify a reef’s location, they express a more selective behavior during settlement by avoiding Dictyotaceae macroalgae and favoring L. intricata. This suggests that the composition of a phase-shifted reef matters to coral recovery, not only that it has shifted to a dominated macroalgal state.

Subjects/Keywords: Coral-algae interaction; Larval behavior; Settlement cues; Laurencia intricata; Dictyopteris; Dictyota; Marine Biology; Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology

…has shifted to a dominated macroalgal state. KEYWORDS: Coral-algae interaction, Larval… …corals and the symbiotic algae living within the coral tissue, Symbiodinium (Shearer et al… …macroalgae. The brown algae family Dictyotaceae has consistently shown a trend in reducing coral… …red algae, particularly crustose coralline algae (CCA), has facilitated coral… …9 Table 2. April 2015 coral larval swimming behavior analysis, Repeated Measures ANOVA to… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Voss, J. N. (2016). Coral recovery on phase-shifted reefs depend upon the type of macroalgae present. (Thesis). Nova Southeastern University. Retrieved from http://nsuworks.nova.edu/occ_stuetd/435

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Voss, Justin N. “Coral recovery on phase-shifted reefs depend upon the type of macroalgae present.” 2016. Thesis, Nova Southeastern University. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://nsuworks.nova.edu/occ_stuetd/435.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Voss, Justin N. “Coral recovery on phase-shifted reefs depend upon the type of macroalgae present.” 2016. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Voss JN. Coral recovery on phase-shifted reefs depend upon the type of macroalgae present. [Internet] [Thesis]. Nova Southeastern University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://nsuworks.nova.edu/occ_stuetd/435.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Voss JN. Coral recovery on phase-shifted reefs depend upon the type of macroalgae present. [Thesis]. Nova Southeastern University; 2016. Available from: http://nsuworks.nova.edu/occ_stuetd/435

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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