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You searched for subject:(cool season grasses). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Gillette, Katrina Lynn. Yield and quality of cool-season perennial grasses for forage and biomass feedstocks in Northeast Colorado.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Soil and Crop Sciences, 2011, Colorado State University

The burning of fossil fuels has led to an increase of the greenhouse gas CO2, which traps heat and increases temperatures of the global climate. The increases of the greenhouse gases, CO2, CH4 and N2O, have been attributed as the cause of the climatic warming during the industrial era. One identified GHG mitigation strategy is the use of long term perennial grass production for bio-fuel use and rangeland restoration. It is estimated that biofuels could offset 30% of current fossil fuel use. Switchgrass, a C4 grass species, was chosen by the DOE as the model crop for cellulosic biofuel because of the plant's perennial nature, high water use efficiency, wide range of exploitable genetics, and its ability to be grown in diverse regions. Yield potentials are often lower for cool-season grasses, but for warm-season grasses like switchgrass difficult establishment and winter stand loss from extreme conditions can be a problem for production. There are many C3 species utilized in the Northeastern and the Western of the United States for rangeland and pasture cattle production. Production difficulties are less likely in some of the hardier C3 grasses in cooler environments. C3 grasses have been historically utilized for animal forage because of superior digestibility and high feed values. The high digestibility is directly correlated to reduced lignin content. Lignin is a primary barrier to the bioconversion process to make ethanol. Increasing the polysaccharide to lignin ratio is one identified route to increasing bio-fuel feedstock quality. These qualities produced in C3 grasses could create a dual feedstock for both animal and bio-fuel production. This may even decrease competition for land resources between livestock producers and bio-energy crop production. Relying on a diversity of bio-energy crops in ecologically different regions will allow for greater stability, resistance, and resilience to climatic and environmental variability. The goals of this study are to compare forage quality analyses of C3 grasses, seasonal partitioning of dry matter (DM), crude protein content (CP), and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF). Fifteen cool-season grasses were selected based on potential productivity under limited irrigation typical to Eastern Colorado. Two spring harvest dates were selected based on important production phases of the plant. The June 1, 2009 harvest (H1) corresponded to the boot to early heading stage. The average for the species statistically grouped the highest yield was 4500 kg/ha. The second spring harvest (H2) was on June 22, 2009 and corresponded to the mid to late heading stage and average yields for this harvest was 6390 kg/ha. These are high yields for the Eastern Plains of Colorado, but it is important to point out at that 2009 had an exceptionally wet spring and summer for the region. Tall, intermediate, crested and western wheatgrass were species that performed the best for the delayed harvest in terms of biofuels quality because they had the greatest increases in yield and… Advisors/Committee Members: Hansen, Neil C. (advisor), Brummer, Joe E. (committee member), Qian, Yaling (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: biofuels; forage quality; cool-season grasses; climate change

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APA (6th Edition):

Gillette, K. L. (2011). Yield and quality of cool-season perennial grasses for forage and biomass feedstocks in Northeast Colorado. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/47308

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gillette, Katrina Lynn. “Yield and quality of cool-season perennial grasses for forage and biomass feedstocks in Northeast Colorado.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/47308.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gillette, Katrina Lynn. “Yield and quality of cool-season perennial grasses for forage and biomass feedstocks in Northeast Colorado.” 2011. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Gillette KL. Yield and quality of cool-season perennial grasses for forage and biomass feedstocks in Northeast Colorado. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/47308.

Council of Science Editors:

Gillette KL. Yield and quality of cool-season perennial grasses for forage and biomass feedstocks in Northeast Colorado. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/47308


University of Kentucky

2. Billman, Eric D. EXAMINING VEGETATIVE GROWTH OF COOL-SEASON FORAGE GRASSES FOR DAIRY CATTLE GRAZING PREFERENCE.

Degree: 2015, University of Kentucky

The objective of this study was to determine dairy cattle preference amongst four species of cool-season forage grasses: eight orchardgrasses (Dactylis glomerata L.), five tall fescues [Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb.) Dumort.], five perennial ryegrasses (Lolium perenne L.), and six festuloliums [xFestulolium braunii (K. Richt.) A. Camus.]; 24 cultivars in total. Each grazing trial utilized four Holstein-Friesian heifers over six hours. Maturity differences were eliminated by having animals graze only vegetative material. After six grazing trials (three each in 2014 and 2015), consistent results in animal preference were not found; three of the six trials did show preference (P

Subjects/Keywords: Forage grasses; Preference; Grazing; Dairy; Cool-season; Agronomy and Crop Sciences; Dairy Science; Plant Breeding and Genetics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Billman, E. D. (2015). EXAMINING VEGETATIVE GROWTH OF COOL-SEASON FORAGE GRASSES FOR DAIRY CATTLE GRAZING PREFERENCE. (Masters Thesis). University of Kentucky. Retrieved from https://uknowledge.uky.edu/pss_etds/69

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Billman, Eric D. “EXAMINING VEGETATIVE GROWTH OF COOL-SEASON FORAGE GRASSES FOR DAIRY CATTLE GRAZING PREFERENCE.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Kentucky. Accessed April 11, 2021. https://uknowledge.uky.edu/pss_etds/69.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Billman, Eric D. “EXAMINING VEGETATIVE GROWTH OF COOL-SEASON FORAGE GRASSES FOR DAIRY CATTLE GRAZING PREFERENCE.” 2015. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Billman ED. EXAMINING VEGETATIVE GROWTH OF COOL-SEASON FORAGE GRASSES FOR DAIRY CATTLE GRAZING PREFERENCE. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Kentucky; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: https://uknowledge.uky.edu/pss_etds/69.

Council of Science Editors:

Billman ED. EXAMINING VEGETATIVE GROWTH OF COOL-SEASON FORAGE GRASSES FOR DAIRY CATTLE GRAZING PREFERENCE. [Masters Thesis]. University of Kentucky; 2015. Available from: https://uknowledge.uky.edu/pss_etds/69


University of Saskatchewan

3. Kusler, Justin P. Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan.

Degree: 2009, University of Saskatchewan

Diverse forage mixtures have improved resilience to drought, improved persistence, ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions, reduced fertilizer costs, improved root mass and greater soil carbon sequestration but do they improve forage and animal production. The objective was to determine if complex native forage mixtures provide superior nutritional quality throughout the grazing season as compared to simple native mixtures. Three studies were conducted in 2007 at Swift Current, SK to evaluate forage production potentials, nutritive qualities and in vitro dry matter digestibility of native and tame forage species common to or having potential in Southwestern Saskatchewan. In study one, plots were seeded in 2006 on Chernozemic Orthic Brown Swinton Loam soils and consisted of 11 native and three tame monoculture species common to southwestern Saskatchewan. Clippings at a 5 cm stubble height occurred on June 20 and every 28 days after until October 10. Forage DM production, in vitro OMD, NDF, ADF, ADL, CP, Ca and P concentrations were measured. As species matured, production and OMD declined (P¡Ü0.05) but NDF, ADF and ADL concentrations increased (P¡Ü0.05). There were harvest date by species differences (P¡Ü0.05) in forage production and nutritional qualities of C3 and C4 grass and legume species. Study two examined the in situ CP, NDF and DM disappearance of six selected species harvested in the fall. EDNDF and ADDM values did not differ (P>0.05) among C3 grasses. The C4 grasses had higher (P Advisors/Committee Members: McKinnon, John J., Iwaasa, Alan D., Lardner, Herbert A., Walburger, Kenric, Laarveld, Bernard, Coulman, Bruce.

Subjects/Keywords: cool season grasses; warm season grasses; nutritive value of forages; grazing; legumes; forages; forage quality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kusler, J. P. (2009). Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12292009-102319

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kusler, Justin P. “Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan.” 2009. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12292009-102319.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kusler, Justin P. “Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan.” 2009. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Kusler JP. Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12292009-102319.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kusler JP. Comparing simple and complex native forage mixtures for grazing cattle in southwestern Saskatchewan. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/etd-12292009-102319

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.