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You searched for subject:(contextual cuing). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Mong, Heather Marie Skeba. Controlled and automatic processing in implicit learning.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2007, Colorado State University

This dissertation proposes a new approach for measuring the cognitive outcomes of learning from implicit tasks: measure the controlled and automatic processes at use by participants after training, and focus on how controllable the acquired knowledge is under different learning conditions as measured through a process-dissociation procedure. This avoids the uncertainty of any explicit knowledge test's ability to exhaustively measure the contents of consciousness, and provides a different way to view the cognitive changes due to implicit task training. This dissertation includes three experiments using two different implicit learning tasks (serial response reaction time [SRTT] and contextual cuing) to test how controllable the knowledge gained from these tasks is. The first two experiments used the SRTT, in which participants have to make the appropriate corresponding spatial response when presented with a visual stimulus in one of four locations. The trained information is a repeating 12-item response series, which participants are not typically told is repeating. These experiments found use of both controlled and automatic processes by participants. When participants were cued that a sequence was repeating (Experiment 2), there was significantly less use of controlled processes than when participants were not cued into the sequence repetition, suggesting a shift away from controlled processes when explicitly learning the repeating information. The third experiment used the contextual cuing visual search task, which requires participants to rapidly locate a target (T) in a field of distracters (L). Participants become faster at locating the target within repeating spatial configurations across training. Experiment 3 also found use of both controlled and automatic processes after training. However, cuing the repetition did not change either controlled or automatic process estimates, suggesting that control over acquired knowledge is not affected by intent to learn. Altogether, the process dissociation approach provides process estimates congruent with existing theoretical explanations of the two implicit learning tasks, and are a useful addition to the techniques available to study implicit learning. Advisors/Committee Members: Seger, Carol (advisor), DeLosh, Ed (committee member), Volbrecht, Vicki (committee member), Draper, Bruce (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: consciousness; contextual cuing; implicit learning; information processing; process dissociation; sequence learning

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APA (6th Edition):

Mong, H. M. S. (2007). Controlled and automatic processing in implicit learning. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/67620

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mong, Heather Marie Skeba. “Controlled and automatic processing in implicit learning.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/67620.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mong, Heather Marie Skeba. “Controlled and automatic processing in implicit learning.” 2007. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Mong HMS. Controlled and automatic processing in implicit learning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/67620.

Council of Science Editors:

Mong HMS. Controlled and automatic processing in implicit learning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/67620

2. Hanson, Ryan. Context and Target Search Reversal: Implicit Flexibility and Rapid Adaptation of Relational Memories Using Visual Search.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2013, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

Repeated perceptual exposure leads to increased accuracy and decreased response latency - referred to as perceptual facilitation or priming - and generally occurs in the absence of conscious memory experience. One example of a priming task which depends upon contextual relations is termed contextual cuing. It has long been held that context-dependent relations can only be acquired with deliberative or explicit processes. While context learning has historically been attributed to declarative memory, the existence of implicit context learning tasks may be better explained as an implicit relational learning process. Although implicit memories have long been characterized as relatively rigid, such tasks raise the possibility of implicit flexible learning. If relational learning entails flexibility in memories and it is possible to encode relations implicitly, then the contextual cuing task should demonstrate implicit flexibility. The current experiments further investigate the idea that relational learning is possible in the absence of awareness by examining a series of three-phase contextual cuing protocols. Using this visual search task, memory for target location in a repeated context is established and then manipulated by altering target location in repeated arrays by moving the target different locations (reversal/switch). If implicit flexibility is possible, then reversing contextual contingencies should only transiently disrupt visual search latencies. As such, these reversals should produce little in the way of a behavioral cost. While reversing contingencies has historically been shown to produce behavioral costs, the consequences of doing so in this type of visual search task has not been attempted. Overall, this study hopes to show an overall greater efficiency in visual search by way of rapidly adapting implicit learning processes. Advisors/Committee Members: Anthony Greene.

Subjects/Keywords: Contextual Cuing; Implicit Memory; Learning; Memory; Relational Learning; Visual Search; Psychology

…implicit memory. The contextual cuing task. One example of a context-dependent experiment is the… …contextual cuing task. Initially described by Chun & Jiang (1998), the contextual cuing… …The contextual cuing task involves two distinct types of learning. Procedural learning… …which facilitates visual search in the contextual cuing paradigm. Recognition tests measuring… …explicit memory support the implicit nature of the contextual cuing effect. As mentioned… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hanson, R. (2013). Context and Target Search Reversal: Implicit Flexibility and Rapid Adaptation of Relational Memories Using Visual Search. (Thesis). University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Retrieved from https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/285

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hanson, Ryan. “Context and Target Search Reversal: Implicit Flexibility and Rapid Adaptation of Relational Memories Using Visual Search.” 2013. Thesis, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/285.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hanson, Ryan. “Context and Target Search Reversal: Implicit Flexibility and Rapid Adaptation of Relational Memories Using Visual Search.” 2013. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Hanson R. Context and Target Search Reversal: Implicit Flexibility and Rapid Adaptation of Relational Memories Using Visual Search. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/285.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hanson R. Context and Target Search Reversal: Implicit Flexibility and Rapid Adaptation of Relational Memories Using Visual Search. [Thesis]. University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee; 2013. Available from: https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/285

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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