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You searched for subject:(consumer connectivity). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Elliott, Caitlin Adeline. Changes In Consumer Behavior Since 1992: A Case Study Of American Shopping Malls.

Degree: MS, Economics & Finance, 2015, University of North Dakota

Consumer behavior is highly correlated with economic conditions. The American shopping mall, an innovation of the 1950’s was built as a retail hub for consumption and entertainment purposes. Utilizing a data set ranging from 1992 – 2014, this paper researches the rapid decline and disappearance of shopping malls. To account for the number of shopping malls that have failed, I use the seasonally adjusted quarterly sales of department stores. Regressions are completed using ordinary least square (OLS) methodology. Three economic and societal changes are studied in regards to the cause behind the decline. The rising income inequality gap, the short term effects of the 2008 recession, and the growth of e-commerce and internet (mobile) connectivity. Of these threats, the most significant cause behind the decline is the growth of e-commerce and the associated innovation of the internet and mobile phone usage. The rising income inequality gap, and the decreasing size of the middle class also offers explanation into the decline. The Gini coefficient is significantly inversely related to the sales of department stores. The least effective theory behind the decline is the Great Recession. The effects of the recession were experienced in every aspect of the economy, and department store sales declined as a results of declining purchasing power and disposable income. Advisors/Committee Members: Prodosh Simlai.

Subjects/Keywords: Connectivity; Consumer Prefrences; E-Commerce; Income Inequality; Shopping Malls; The 2008 Recession

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Elliott, C. A. (2015). Changes In Consumer Behavior Since 1992: A Case Study Of American Shopping Malls. (Masters Thesis). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/1893

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Elliott, Caitlin Adeline. “Changes In Consumer Behavior Since 1992: A Case Study Of American Shopping Malls.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of North Dakota. Accessed January 24, 2021. https://commons.und.edu/theses/1893.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Elliott, Caitlin Adeline. “Changes In Consumer Behavior Since 1992: A Case Study Of American Shopping Malls.” 2015. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Elliott CA. Changes In Consumer Behavior Since 1992: A Case Study Of American Shopping Malls. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1893.

Council of Science Editors:

Elliott CA. Changes In Consumer Behavior Since 1992: A Case Study Of American Shopping Malls. [Masters Thesis]. University of North Dakota; 2015. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1893


Delft University of Technology

2. Bouma, Jozine (author). Design for customer engagement in the transition to a circular economy: A case study in Senseo coffee machines.

Degree: 2019, Delft University of Technology

This report is a graduation thesis for the master Integrated Product Design at the Delft University of Technology. Carried out in collaboration with Philips Design in the Netherlands. The project is about how to engage consumers in the transition from a linear towards a circular economy in which we make more efficient use of materials and resources. One of Philips’ objectives for 2020 (Philips.com, 2016) is that 15% of the turnover should come from solutions that meet Circular Economy principles. This was 8% in 2015 (Philips.be, 2016) which is a big change for a company. Senseo has a large installed base. This is due to the huge success of the product since its launch in 2001. In 2012 a Senseo could be found in 60% of Dutch, and 27% of French households (Expatica.com, 2012). Besides, Senseo is the best sold product in the coffee business of Philips, mainly because its ease of use (Senseo.nl, 2018). Because of the high volumes and high distribution in the Netherlands and surrounding countries, an opportunity is found for creating much circular impact with the Senseo. However, companies cannot shift to a circular economy alone: consumers are crucial in the success of the circular economy. Because even if a product is designed to circulate in a closed loop, its potential will only be realized if the consumer participates. Therefore, the goal of the project is to activate consumers to engage in the circular economy with a case study in Senseo coffee machines. Senseo users can show circular behavior by taking good care of the product and by repairing it when it is malfunctioning, for extending the product’s lifetime. At the end-of-life of the product, the user can contribute by disposing the product at proper recycling points in order for the materials to be reused. The outcome of the project is by integrating connectivity in the product (the internet of things, IoT), circular behavior among consumers can be stimulated and circular impact can be achieved. Two main findings of the analysis are: 1. Need for support at the point of malfunctioning 2. After-sales data gaps Connectivity (IoT) can contribute to these findings as follows. Connectivity can improve support because it facilitates easy access. The support stimulates circular behavior because users that receive support are encouraged and more likely to solve the problem instead of replacing it. By registering the product, users data can be gathered. This enables a virtuous circle because with the gathered data the support can be based on customer segmentation (e.g. demographics) and users can receive more customized support. This corresponds to the Utopian vision that by means of a connected service, the Senseo has an unlimited lifetime and any of its parts can be replaced. Of course this is an ideal situation from an environmental perspective which cannot be achieved in the short term. By creating a roadmap, steps are proposed that contribute to getting closer to achieving this… Advisors/Committee Members: Mugge, Ruth (mentor), van Engelen, Jo (mentor), Poppelaars, Flora (mentor), Delft University of Technology (degree granting institution).

Subjects/Keywords: Consumer Behaviour; Circular Economy; Connectivity; IoT; Internet of Things; Product Service System

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bouma, J. (. (2019). Design for customer engagement in the transition to a circular economy: A case study in Senseo coffee machines. (Masters Thesis). Delft University of Technology. Retrieved from http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:e7213166-3a06-4e7e-8c9e-47e63af14c05

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bouma, Jozine (author). “Design for customer engagement in the transition to a circular economy: A case study in Senseo coffee machines.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Delft University of Technology. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:e7213166-3a06-4e7e-8c9e-47e63af14c05.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bouma, Jozine (author). “Design for customer engagement in the transition to a circular economy: A case study in Senseo coffee machines.” 2019. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Bouma J(. Design for customer engagement in the transition to a circular economy: A case study in Senseo coffee machines. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:e7213166-3a06-4e7e-8c9e-47e63af14c05.

Council of Science Editors:

Bouma J(. Design for customer engagement in the transition to a circular economy: A case study in Senseo coffee machines. [Masters Thesis]. Delft University of Technology; 2019. Available from: http://resolver.tudelft.nl/uuid:e7213166-3a06-4e7e-8c9e-47e63af14c05

3. Iucolano, Donna M. HYPERCONNECTIVITY GIVETH AND TAKETH AWAY: RECONCILING BEING AN “ALWAYS-ON” EMPOWERED CONSUMER AND PRIVACY IN AN ERA OF PERVASIVE PERSONAL DATA EXCHANGES.

Degree: PhD, Management, 2019, Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies

We are living in an era of rising connectivity where consumers of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds are “always-on.” Consumers can now engage constantly with brands, retailers, content, and each other through real-time interactions, facilitated by a mobile-first mindset. This has earned consumers the moniker, “highly empowered.” Consumers are indeed empowered by the growth of the internet/mobile, proliferation of devices, and unprecedented access to information, choice, and control. However, rising connectivity also has downsides. Consumers now face a barrage of decisions about whether to share their personal information with firms or accept its collection without their explicit consent. The outcomes of these automatic, one-time decisions are far-reaching and long-lasting. They also empower firms—perhaps more than consumers; something most marketers prefer to keep secret. This research study addresses how “always-on” supposedly empowered consumers behave while shopping and make decisions in an era of pervasive personal information exchanges with retailers and others. It uses an exploratory, sequential mixed methods design beginning with a qualitative study followed by two quantitative studies. Study 1 investigates how 40 connected consumers behave and make decisions in shopping/retail environments. Findings reveal pros and cons of rising connectivity, dynamic behavior that challenges traditional customer segmentation, and tensions over privacy and personal data exchanges with retailers. These tensions are explored in Study 2 using survey data collected from 790 U.S. consumers, all heavy internet/mobile users. Consumer acceptance of personal data collection is interpreted as a form of coping with the stress of digital life. Study 3 extends Study 2 by focusing on three moderating effects on consumer willingness to share personal data or have it collected: perceived marketing intrusiveness, high versus low privacy knowledge, and high versus low privacy-protecting behaviors. Many findings are counterintuitive with few statistically significant differences in consumer attitudes—all affected by their perceptions of fairness in exchanges with firms. This work contributes to the emerging streams of research about consumer privacy, personal data exchanges, perceptions of fairness, and consumer acceptance in an era of presumed high consumer empowerment. It also has implications for marketers and marketing strategies, consumer advocates, and public policy. Advisors/Committee Members: Niraj, Rakesh (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Management; Marketing; Technology; Information Science; always-on consumer; consumer connectivity; privacy; personal data exchanges; consumer empowerment; disempowerment; fairness of exchanges; consumer acceptance; consumer decision making; shopping; digital commerce; mixed methods; cluster analysis

…policy. Keywords: always-on consumer; consumer connectivity; privacy; personal data exchanges… …control, and—if so—over what? Rising consumer connectivity also has downsides. Experts and… …most marketers would no doubt prefer to keep secret: as consumer connectivity and empowerment… …x28;Kucuk, 2009: 327). Consumer rising connectivity and its empowerment consequent can… …Therefore, they disempower consumers. That rising consumer connectivity can simultaneously empower… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Iucolano, D. M. (2019). HYPERCONNECTIVITY GIVETH AND TAKETH AWAY: RECONCILING BEING AN “ALWAYS-ON” EMPOWERED CONSUMER AND PRIVACY IN AN ERA OF PERVASIVE PERSONAL DATA EXCHANGES. (Doctoral Dissertation). Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1554468526463455

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Iucolano, Donna M. “HYPERCONNECTIVITY GIVETH AND TAKETH AWAY: RECONCILING BEING AN “ALWAYS-ON” EMPOWERED CONSUMER AND PRIVACY IN AN ERA OF PERVASIVE PERSONAL DATA EXCHANGES.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1554468526463455.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Iucolano, Donna M. “HYPERCONNECTIVITY GIVETH AND TAKETH AWAY: RECONCILING BEING AN “ALWAYS-ON” EMPOWERED CONSUMER AND PRIVACY IN AN ERA OF PERVASIVE PERSONAL DATA EXCHANGES.” 2019. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Iucolano DM. HYPERCONNECTIVITY GIVETH AND TAKETH AWAY: RECONCILING BEING AN “ALWAYS-ON” EMPOWERED CONSUMER AND PRIVACY IN AN ERA OF PERVASIVE PERSONAL DATA EXCHANGES. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1554468526463455.

Council of Science Editors:

Iucolano DM. HYPERCONNECTIVITY GIVETH AND TAKETH AWAY: RECONCILING BEING AN “ALWAYS-ON” EMPOWERED CONSUMER AND PRIVACY IN AN ERA OF PERVASIVE PERSONAL DATA EXCHANGES. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies; 2019. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1554468526463455

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