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You searched for subject:(community development sport). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Pretoria

1. Phaswana, Ntshengedzeni. Sport funding of schools in low socio- economic communities in Gauteng.

Degree: MA, Biokinetics, Sport and Leisure Sciences, 2019, University of Pretoria

In 1959, opinions regarding sport and its place in education were expressed for the first time at an international conference “Sport, Work and Health” organised by UNESCO, (ED-76/Conf). Leisure and sport activities are thought to be developmentally important because it provides opportunities for skill development and the formation of social relationship during adolescence (Fourie, Slabbert & Saaymen, 2011. Children from the Low Socio-Economic Community often grow up without the opportunity to sharpen these skills and qualities in them due to meagre of physical education programmes which are professional structured to develop their talent. Walter (2014) concluded that in South Africa children from historically black communities and schools previously disadvantage by apartheid, have limited physical activity opportunities due to the marginalization of physical education in the school curriculum, inadequate extra-curriculum, community sports provision, the paucity or poor standard of available facilities and equipment. The condition has remained perpetual from generation to generation with no change in how sport programmes are structured. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence, nature, and importance of funding to schools in Low socio- Economic communities. Sport is widely regarded as a social agent that connects many grassroots communities, whereas business has more difficulty reaching communities on their own (Dhurup,2012). The overall aim of the study was to establish the core fundamental problems of insufficient funding in sport for marginalised schools in Gauteng. Inadequate funding has been identified as a major setback facing sports development in low socio-economic schools in South Africa (Elumilade, Asaolu, Oladoyin & Oladele, 2006). The interest in soccer is so pervasive that rough open land is used for practice session, although these areas are uneven covered with stones and in some instance broken glass, it is salutary to observe how passive the coaches and players are in the face of what one admittedly deplorable condition (Williams and Atkinson, 2009). Despite the poor condition in which township schools must conduct sports programmes, the schools have not given up and sporting codes like soccer, athletics and netball are played in townships like Kagiso. There is sufficient evidence for the researcher to make a conclusion that funding problem at Low socio-economic school are exacerbate by lack of ownership and support from both parents and school’s official who priorities more on academics and less extramural activities at schools. Advisors/Committee Members: Van der Klashorst, Engela (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Sport funding; Primary school sport; Low Socio- Economic Community; Physical Education; High school sport; Sport Development; UCTD

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APA (6th Edition):

Phaswana, N. (2019). Sport funding of schools in low socio- economic communities in Gauteng. (Masters Thesis). University of Pretoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2263/68470

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Phaswana, Ntshengedzeni. “Sport funding of schools in low socio- economic communities in Gauteng.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Pretoria. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2263/68470.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Phaswana, Ntshengedzeni. “Sport funding of schools in low socio- economic communities in Gauteng.” 2019. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Phaswana N. Sport funding of schools in low socio- economic communities in Gauteng. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/68470.

Council of Science Editors:

Phaswana N. Sport funding of schools in low socio- economic communities in Gauteng. [Masters Thesis]. University of Pretoria; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2263/68470


University of Guelph

2. Sansom, Heather. Rural Recreation for Resilience: Youth Development and Life Skill Outcomes in 4 H Ontario Horse Clubs .

Degree: 2018, University of Guelph

Canada has widely acknowledged deficits in population physical and mental health, especially for marginalised populations such as those in rural areas. Low scores on youth wellbeing create a need for new options to promote physical activity and psycho-social skill development. While there are lower health indicators for rural areas, they are rich in assets for contextually relevant physical recreation and youth development activities. Equine activity, that is an Olympic sport, leisure activity, and physical and mental health therapy, is one such option. This study examined resilience and other life skills through participation in 4 H horse clubs. 4-H is an international youth development organization that has been in Canada for over 100 years. Arising at the same time as Scouts and other established youth development organizations, 4-H was uniquely dedicated to the needs of rural communities. Today clubs are in urban and rural areas, with a variety of topics. They are community-based, low-cost, and often inclusive of persons with different abilities. Horse clubs were targeted because of the wealth of literature available on therapeutic equine activity, and because of 4 H’s unique use of this form of physical recreation within a positive youth development framework. The study used a three-phase, mixed-method approach within a resilience lens: 1) an online survey to all horse club members (536, n = 56) and leaders (105, n = 4) across Ontario incorporating the Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM-28) and Schwarzer and Jerusalem Self-Efficacy Scales; 2) key informant interviews (n = 10); and 3) group youth interviews with image elicitation (5 clubs, n = 30). Youth with different needs due to disability, cognitive ability, family situation, social status or other risk factors were included. Findings indicated high levels of resilience resources. Participants described resilience, together with other outcomes such as confidence and transferrable social and workforce skills. They also discussed processes that they felt facilitated these benefits. Findings are relevant to sport for positive youth development, therapeutic recreation, animal and nature-based programming, equine programming specifically, and to rural community development. Advisors/Committee Members: Fitzgibbon, John (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: rural mental health; resilience; positive youth development; sport for youth development; youth development through sport; therapeutic recreation; experiential learning; outdoor learning; green care; 4-H; equine assisted learning; equine facilitated; equine therapy; outdoor experiential learning; adventure therapy; well-being; equine based activity; equine assisted activity; mental health promotion; rural wellbeing; nature based therapy; animal based therapy; green physical activity; nature deficit; youth development; youth resilience; healthy communities; rural youth; recreation therapy; community recreation; recreation therapy; history of recreation in Canada; rural recreation; rational recreation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sansom, H. (2018). Rural Recreation for Resilience: Youth Development and Life Skill Outcomes in 4 H Ontario Horse Clubs . (Thesis). University of Guelph. Retrieved from https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/13965

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sansom, Heather. “Rural Recreation for Resilience: Youth Development and Life Skill Outcomes in 4 H Ontario Horse Clubs .” 2018. Thesis, University of Guelph. Accessed October 23, 2019. https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/13965.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sansom, Heather. “Rural Recreation for Resilience: Youth Development and Life Skill Outcomes in 4 H Ontario Horse Clubs .” 2018. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Sansom H. Rural Recreation for Resilience: Youth Development and Life Skill Outcomes in 4 H Ontario Horse Clubs . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Guelph; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/13965.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sansom H. Rural Recreation for Resilience: Youth Development and Life Skill Outcomes in 4 H Ontario Horse Clubs . [Thesis]. University of Guelph; 2018. Available from: https://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca/xmlui/handle/10214/13965

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Montana

3. Tenney, Kira E. Whitewater Ecotourism Development In Bhutan: Opportunities And Challenges for Local Communities.

Degree: MS, 2019, University of Montana

Whitewater raft and kayak ecotourism can provide environmental, social-cultural, and economic benefits and opportunities to local communities, but can also result in respective challenges. Globally, adventure ecotourism is seen as a potent win-win strategy for conservation and local community development; however, there is a significant proportion of adventure and whitewater tourism that do not meet ecotourism tenets, and there is a call for incorporating greater investment in local community involvement. Whitewater ecotourism is particularly significant because of the unique opportunities and challenges associated with rivers, the resource upon which the industry directly depends. Clean, free-flowing rivers provide a range of crucial ecosystem services, but are simultaneously experiencing rampant threats to existence, such as widespread large-scale hydropower development and increases in waste. Worldwide there is a call for growing local, national, and international efforts to address these threats. In Bhutan, a Himalayan Buddhist kingdom with a small but growing whitewater ecotourism industry, proposals for large-scale hydropower development and growing amounts of trash are changing Bhutan’s rivers and communities, yet there has been little research conducted on impacts of whitewater ecotourism related to communities and rivers in Bhutan.Through a case study in Panbang, Bhutan with the community-based raft company River Guides of Panbang, this research applies a qualitative methods approach to explore whitewater ecotourism related opportunities and challenges for local communities. The findings offer unique aspects of whitewater ecotourism in Bhutan; perceived opportunities, constraints, and constraint negotiations to increase women’s participation in whitewater ecotourism as river guides; and opportunities for the whitewater ecotourism industry in Panbang to engage in addressing Bhutan’s river threats of hydropower development and waste management. These outcomes provide a foundational understanding for specific benefits and constraints associated with whitewater ecotourism in Panbang, Bhutan that can inform sustainable tourism planning for whitewater ecotourism and river conservation initiatives at the local and national scale.

Subjects/Keywords: sustainable ecotourism planning and management; whitewater raft kayak tourism; international conservation and development; women's sport adventure tourism participation; community engagement river conservation stewardship; hydropower perspectives; community waste management practices; Bhutan; Asian Studies; Education; Environmental Studies; Geography; International and Area Studies; Nature and Society Relations; Social and Behavioral Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tenney, K. E. (2019). Whitewater Ecotourism Development In Bhutan: Opportunities And Challenges for Local Communities. (Masters Thesis). University of Montana. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/11440

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tenney, Kira E. “Whitewater Ecotourism Development In Bhutan: Opportunities And Challenges for Local Communities.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Montana. Accessed October 23, 2019. https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/11440.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tenney, Kira E. “Whitewater Ecotourism Development In Bhutan: Opportunities And Challenges for Local Communities.” 2019. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tenney KE. Whitewater Ecotourism Development In Bhutan: Opportunities And Challenges for Local Communities. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Montana; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/11440.

Council of Science Editors:

Tenney KE. Whitewater Ecotourism Development In Bhutan: Opportunities And Challenges for Local Communities. [Masters Thesis]. University of Montana; 2019. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/11440

.