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You searched for subject:(collaborative forest governance). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Michigan Technological University

1. Dunn, Jennifer L. WISCONSIN NON-INDUSTRIAL PRIVATE FOREST LANDOWNERS AND WOOD-BASED BIOENERGY.

Degree: PhD, Department of Social Sciences, 2018, Michigan Technological University

Wood-based bioelectricity production is expanding due to its ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions compared to conventional fossil fuel resources. U.S. non-industrial private forest landowners (NIPFs) are key to the production of wood-based bioelectricity since they own 59% of the forestland in the country that could supply bioelectricity feedstocks (The National Association of State Foresters 2018). This is particularly important in states like Wisconsin with a mandatory renewable portfolio electricity standard (RPS). My dissertation focuses on issues around Wisconsin bioelectricity production including related NIPF views and the creation of the state’s sustainable biomass harvesting guidelines. In Chapter Two, I present findings from analysis of NIPF interviews showing that they support local bioelectricity production while holding concerns about negative social and ecological impacts. Chapter Three focuses on findings from a survey conducted of NIPFs close enough to a local bioelectricity plant to supply it with biomass feedstock. I found that they perceive the plant as having negative environmental but positive socioeconomic impacts and that environmental membership was negatively associated with support for local bioelectricity. Chapter Four presents findings from my study of Wisconsin’s biomass harvesting guidelines (BHGs) creation process. These findings focus on the degree to which the process adhered to Collaborative Governance (CG) guidelines and how this process impacted outcomes. In combination, these three chapters enhance our understanding of the sustainability dimensions of Wisconsin’s RPS and suggest strategies related to the success of state and federal renewable energy and bioelectricity goals. Advisors/Committee Members: Kathleen E. Halvorsen.

Subjects/Keywords: bioenergy; collaborative governance; Forest landowners; perceptions; Energy Policy

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APA (6th Edition):

Dunn, J. L. (2018). WISCONSIN NON-INDUSTRIAL PRIVATE FOREST LANDOWNERS AND WOOD-BASED BIOENERGY. (Doctoral Dissertation). Michigan Technological University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/656

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dunn, Jennifer L. “WISCONSIN NON-INDUSTRIAL PRIVATE FOREST LANDOWNERS AND WOOD-BASED BIOENERGY.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Michigan Technological University. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/656.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dunn, Jennifer L. “WISCONSIN NON-INDUSTRIAL PRIVATE FOREST LANDOWNERS AND WOOD-BASED BIOENERGY.” 2018. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Dunn JL. WISCONSIN NON-INDUSTRIAL PRIVATE FOREST LANDOWNERS AND WOOD-BASED BIOENERGY. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/656.

Council of Science Editors:

Dunn JL. WISCONSIN NON-INDUSTRIAL PRIVATE FOREST LANDOWNERS AND WOOD-BASED BIOENERGY. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/656


Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

2. Axelsson, Robert. Landscape approach for sustainable development.

Degree: 2009, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Sustainable development (SD) as a process and ultimately sustainability as a goal are key challenges for humanity. There are many policies that support the shift to more sustainable natural resource management. While many different concepts and approaches have been proposed, few practical ways to implement SD and sustainability have succeeded on the ground in real landscapes. To consider a larger geographical area, and to include both social and ecological systems and their interactions, is termed landscape approach. I define and operationalise the landscape approach and its five core features; (1) a geographical area, (2) collaboration among stakeholders, (3) a commitment to sustainable development, (4) knowledge production, and (5) sharing of knowledge and experiences. The five papers in this thesis investigated different features of the landscape approach. Paper I concludes that both Biosphere Reserve and Model Forest (MF) qualify as landscape approaches. In paper II the Kovdozersky MF in NW Russia was evaluated with the aim to support its development. The MF was mainly driven by forest sector actors and a model for local participation was under development. In addition they were influenced by Nordic forestry because they perceived it being a role model for sustainable forest management. In paper III the motivation for initiation of two Russian and two Swedish MF initiatives were studied, and a framework for analysis of local partnerships was presented. Motivations for initiation were diverse and included conservation of pristine forests, to create a Russian model for intensive industrial forest management, rural development, and to prevent conflicts between the forest industry and conservationists. In paper IV I presented a simple model based on natural forest disturbance regimes to identify forest site types where alternatives to clear-felling would be feasible for ecological reasons. In paper V a model for transdisciplinary knowledge production as a collaborative learning process was presented, and a transdisciplinary research programme was analysed. I conclude that the landscape approach can contribute to SD and that collaboration among stakeholders and activities that produce real outcomes on the ground are needed.

Subjects/Keywords: forest management; sustainability; resource management; rural development; participation; local government; collaborative learning; integrative research; natural resource management; partnership; sustainable forest management; governance; rural development

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Axelsson, R. (2009). Landscape approach for sustainable development. (Doctoral Dissertation). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Retrieved from http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/2174/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Axelsson, Robert. “Landscape approach for sustainable development.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/2174/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Axelsson, Robert. “Landscape approach for sustainable development.” 2009. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Axelsson R. Landscape approach for sustainable development. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/2174/.

Council of Science Editors:

Axelsson R. Landscape approach for sustainable development. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; 2009. Available from: http://pub.epsilon.slu.se/2174/

3. Egunyu, Felicitas. The contributions of social learning to collaborative forest governance in Canada and Uganda: Lessons from forest-based communities.

Degree: 2015, University of Saskatchewan

Collaborative forest governance is viewed as promising for sustainable forestry because it allows forest-based communities to participate directly in management activities and benefit from resource use or protection. Forest-based communities are important because they provide contextual knowledge about the forestry resources being managed. Collaborative forest governance can be strengthened through social learning. Despite significant research on social learning in environmental governance, it is not clear how social learning evolves over time, who has access to social learning opportunities, who influences social learning, and whether learning influences management effectiveness. This study investigated the contributions of social learning to collaborative forest governance in two forest-based organizations: Harrop-Procter Community Forest in Canada, and Kapeka Integrated Conservation Development Agency in Uganda. Data were collected using personal interviews, key person interviews, focus group meetings, and participant observation. Results revealed that in both organizations, participants started engaging in forest management with limited information and learned as they engaged in various activities. In addition, for both organizations, government set the context for what was learned through forest policy. Nevertheless, learning was influenced by the governance structure chosen in the Canadian case whereas learning was influenced by non-governmental organizations in the Ugandan case. As the Canadian organization became effective at complying with forestry legislation over time, learning opportunities and outcomes became more restricted, especially for women. Meanwhile at the Ugandan organization, learning opportunities and outcomes remained restricted for illiterate people irrespective of their gender. In conclusion, this study’s findings suggest that the prevalent view that social learning increases collaboration and collective action in forest resource management cannot be assumed. Advisors/Committee Members: Reed, Maureen G., Sinclair, John A., Barrett, Mary-Jean, Johnson, Mark, Rayner, Jeremy.

Subjects/Keywords: collaborative forest governance; community forest; forest-based communities; gender; non-governmental organizations; social learning

…PARTICIPATION AND SOCIAL LEARNING IN COLLABORATIVE FOREST GOVERNANCE… …AND SOCIAL LEARNING IN COLLABORATIVE FOREST GOVERNANCE .... 85 4.1 Introduction… …89 4.2.2 Challenges to understanding social learning in collaborative forest governance… …98 4.5.2 Gendered social learning outcomes during collaborative forest governance… …governance 112 4.6.2 Gender and social learning spaces in collaborative forest governance… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Egunyu, F. (2015). The contributions of social learning to collaborative forest governance in Canada and Uganda: Lessons from forest-based communities. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-08-2162

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Egunyu, Felicitas. “The contributions of social learning to collaborative forest governance in Canada and Uganda: Lessons from forest-based communities.” 2015. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-08-2162.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Egunyu, Felicitas. “The contributions of social learning to collaborative forest governance in Canada and Uganda: Lessons from forest-based communities.” 2015. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Egunyu F. The contributions of social learning to collaborative forest governance in Canada and Uganda: Lessons from forest-based communities. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-08-2162.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Egunyu F. The contributions of social learning to collaborative forest governance in Canada and Uganda: Lessons from forest-based communities. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/ETD-2015-08-2162

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.