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You searched for subject:(coal towns). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Montana Tech

1. Woerner, John Reed. Central places of southeastern Montana.

Degree: MA, 1975, Montana Tech

Subjects/Keywords: Economic zoning Montana.; Cities and towns Montana.; Coal Montana.

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APA (6th Edition):

Woerner, J. R. (1975). Central places of southeastern Montana. (Masters Thesis). Montana Tech. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/5139

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Woerner, John Reed. “Central places of southeastern Montana.” 1975. Masters Thesis, Montana Tech. Accessed June 20, 2019. https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/5139.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Woerner, John Reed. “Central places of southeastern Montana.” 1975. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Woerner JR. Central places of southeastern Montana. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Montana Tech; 1975. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/5139.

Council of Science Editors:

Woerner JR. Central places of southeastern Montana. [Masters Thesis]. Montana Tech; 1975. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/5139


Virginia Tech

2. Brewster, Thomas M. An Historical Coal Mining Community and Its School: A Study of Pocahontas High School, 1908-1991.

Degree: EdD, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, 2000, Virginia Tech

Pocahontas High School, the smallest of four Tazewell County high schools, is presently located in the historic town of Pocahontas, Virginia. From the school's establishment in 1908 until 1955, the high school was located at the top of Water Street within the town limits. In 1955, students were moved to a new building at its present site just inside the town's corporate limits. The school today serves the communities of Abbs Valley, Boissevain, and the Town of Pocahontas, Virginia. This study included an examination of the role of the school in the mining community, and the relationship between the coal company and the school. Thus, the researcher reviewed literature-surrounding life in mining industrial towns to determine whether Pocahontas conformed to the conventional interpretations of such mining-industrial communities. The researcher also considered the life of the school and community following the cessation of mining operations in Pocahontas. An examination of the reasons for the school having remained open despite declining enrollment and the importance of the school to its communities was examined through the eyes of local community leaders, residents, and graduates of Pocahontas High School. This study employed conventional historical research methods in order to document the history of Pocahontas High School. The data collected from documents and interviews were handled qualitatively, with some data appearing in the form of numbers and graphs. Data gathered for this study were derived from both primary and secondary sources. This study used written, pictorial, and oral sources. Oral materials included oral history interviews with local historians, public officials and individuals involved with Pocahontas High School during the period of study. Triangulation verification techniques were used to accurately describe the impact of coal mining and the closing of the mine on the development, growth, and decline of the school and community. Advisors/Committee Members: McGehee, Stuart (committee member), Parson, Stephen R. (committee member), Cutlip, Bobbi J. (committee member), Dawson, Christina M. (committeecochair), Carlton, Patrick W. (committeecochair).

Subjects/Keywords: coal mining; school and community; schooling; Pocahontas; small schools; coal towns

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APA (6th Edition):

Brewster, T. M. (2000). An Historical Coal Mining Community and Its School: A Study of Pocahontas High School, 1908-1991. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29752

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brewster, Thomas M. “An Historical Coal Mining Community and Its School: A Study of Pocahontas High School, 1908-1991.” 2000. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29752.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brewster, Thomas M. “An Historical Coal Mining Community and Its School: A Study of Pocahontas High School, 1908-1991.” 2000. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Brewster TM. An Historical Coal Mining Community and Its School: A Study of Pocahontas High School, 1908-1991. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2000. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29752.

Council of Science Editors:

Brewster TM. An Historical Coal Mining Community and Its School: A Study of Pocahontas High School, 1908-1991. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2000. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29752


Ohio University

3. Deaner, Larry Scott. Home in the McDowell County Coalfields: The African-American Population of Keystone, West Virginia.

Degree: MA, Geography (Arts and Sciences), 2004, Ohio University

At first glance, Keystone appears very similar to other small coal towns in southern West Virginia. Dilapidated and empty buildings, coal dust, and churches are evident on the landscape. However, Keystone is far from a typical coal town in central Appalachia. Although Keystone’s population has been dropping since the period following WWII, the population that remains in this small city is largely African-American. The 2000 census indicates that of the 453 residents in Keystone, 73 percent are black. According to current literature, this should not be the case. African-Americans left southern West Virginia in the post-WWII era of mechanization in the coal industry. The persistence of the African-American community is due to several factors, including home ownership opportunities, the presence of a diverse economy, and political leadership at the local and state level. I use histories, archives, and interviews with residents and historians to argue that Keystone, West Virginia, is the capital of “The Free State of McDowell.” Advisors/Committee Members: Buckley, Geoffrey (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Geography; McDowell County, West Virginia; African American Communities; Coal Towns; Appalachian Diversity; African American Persistence; Keystone, West Virginia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Deaner, L. S. (2004). Home in the McDowell County Coalfields: The African-American Population of Keystone, West Virginia. (Masters Thesis). Ohio University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1089820789

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Deaner, Larry Scott. “Home in the McDowell County Coalfields: The African-American Population of Keystone, West Virginia.” 2004. Masters Thesis, Ohio University. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1089820789.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Deaner, Larry Scott. “Home in the McDowell County Coalfields: The African-American Population of Keystone, West Virginia.” 2004. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Deaner LS. Home in the McDowell County Coalfields: The African-American Population of Keystone, West Virginia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Ohio University; 2004. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1089820789.

Council of Science Editors:

Deaner LS. Home in the McDowell County Coalfields: The African-American Population of Keystone, West Virginia. [Masters Thesis]. Ohio University; 2004. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1089820789

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