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You searched for subject:(co curricular support). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Northeastern University

1. Dias, Paula Ribeiro. The experience of low-income college students at a selective university: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Degree: EdD, School of Education, 2017, Northeastern University

Low-income students at selective institutions report feeling a sense of isolation, alienation, and marginalization. However, it is essential that the voices of low-income students that have successfully navigated the college experience be part of the conversation. Rather than approach the study from a deficit perspective, this Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis explored what individual characteristics or institutional strategies lead to the successful social and academic integration of low-income students at selective universities. From a strengths based resiliency theoretical framework, this study examined the positive personal and environmental protective factors that help students to succeed despite difficult financial circumstances. Data was collected through interviews with eight low-income college seniors who shared stories about their undergraduate experience. Results indicate that low-income students succeed by discovering their passion in academics, involvement, and leadership development as well as through a multilayered support system that includes faculty and staff mentors, family, and friends. Through a combination of personal motivation, institutional interventions, and supportive individuals, students were able to succeed academically and socially in college despite their low-income backgrounds. This research demonstrates the need for selective institutions to provide a strong support system through academic and co-curricular engagement opportunities targeting low-income students.

Subjects/Keywords: co-curricular; college student; low-income; mentoring; support system; university

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dias, P. R. (2017). The experience of low-income college students at a selective university: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Northeastern University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20247113

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dias, Paula Ribeiro. “The experience of low-income college students at a selective university: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Northeastern University. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20247113.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dias, Paula Ribeiro. “The experience of low-income college students at a selective university: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.” 2017. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Dias PR. The experience of low-income college students at a selective university: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20247113.

Council of Science Editors:

Dias PR. The experience of low-income college students at a selective university: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Northeastern University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20247113

2. Bylczynski, Amanda. Assessing Student Affairs: Design and Implementation of Best Practices for Assessment of Supportive Services and Co-curricular Education.

Degree: 2019, Ferris State University

Assessment is an important component of research for any college or university. The data collected provides important information for internal improvements needed to enhance the quality of education the institution. While academic divisions have been assessing programs and general education for a long period of time, assessing student affairs is still relatively new. Supportive services and co-curricular education however serve an important function to provide a full image of student learning. For this reason, accrediting agencies require data to be shown demonstrating learning is taking place outside of the classroom. To begin assessment of supportive services and co-curricular education, the best place to start is with the best practices of institutions already assessing these areas. By examining the handbooks and practices of colleges and universities successfully assessing student affairs areas, specific aspects can be used to build a handbook for other institutions. Examination for best practices include important steps to development, the structure of student affairs, identifying the data collection team, steps to develop the mission statements and purposes of services and co-curricular education, creating student learning objectives to be assessed, tool development methods, steps to data collection, and how to report findings. The product created for this dissertation uses the best practices of community colleges and universities to create a handbook for assessing supportive services and co- curricular education for Edison State Community College. By using current literature and exploratory meetings with leaders of departments, the author developed matrices with the mission and purpose statements and student learning objectives of supportive s e r vices and co-curricular activities currently in place at Edison State Community College. Using the matrices created and b est practices identified, the author developed tools to assess the different areas. This handbook will be used for internal improvements at Edison State Community College as well as data for accreditation purposes.

Subjects/Keywords: Assessment.; Co-curricular activities.; Student Affairs.; Support services.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bylczynski, A. (2019). Assessing Student Affairs: Design and Implementation of Best Practices for Assessment of Supportive Services and Co-curricular Education. (Thesis). Ferris State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2323/6439

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bylczynski, Amanda. “Assessing Student Affairs: Design and Implementation of Best Practices for Assessment of Supportive Services and Co-curricular Education.” 2019. Thesis, Ferris State University. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2323/6439.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bylczynski, Amanda. “Assessing Student Affairs: Design and Implementation of Best Practices for Assessment of Supportive Services and Co-curricular Education.” 2019. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bylczynski A. Assessing Student Affairs: Design and Implementation of Best Practices for Assessment of Supportive Services and Co-curricular Education. [Internet] [Thesis]. Ferris State University; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2323/6439.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bylczynski A. Assessing Student Affairs: Design and Implementation of Best Practices for Assessment of Supportive Services and Co-curricular Education. [Thesis]. Ferris State University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2323/6439

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Lee Jr, Walter Curtis. Providing Co-Curricular Support: A Multi-Case Study of Engineering Student Support Centers.

Degree: PhD, Engineering Education, 2015, Virginia Tech

In response to the student retention and diversity issues that have been persistent in undergraduate engineering education, many colleges have developed Engineering Student Support Centers (ESSCs) such as Minority Engineering Programs (MEPs) and Women in Engineering Programs (WEPs). ESSCs provide underrepresented students with co-curricular support using student interventions in the form of programs, activities, and services. However, ESSCs have a relatively short history and there are gaps in our knowledge about these support systems. While the practice of providing students with co-curricular support has been evaluated, theories of co-curricular support have not been as thoroughly investigated; we know very little about how co-curricular support functions alongside engineering curricula. In an effort to help close the gaps in current literature, the purpose of my study was to explore how the student interventions offered alongside engineering curricula influence the undergraduate experience. To address this purpose, I used a multi-case study design to explore the particulars of six ESSCs housed at four institutions. I focused on the ESSC administrators (those who provide support) and undergraduate students (those who receive support) using multiple qualitative data collection methods. The primary result of this study was the Model of Co-curricular Support (MCCS), which is a version of Tinto's Model of Institutional Departure that I repurposed to demonstrate the breadth of co-curricular assistance required to comprehensively support undergraduate engineering students. The MCCS illustrates how a student's interaction with the academic, social, and professional systems within a college–as well as the university system surrounding the college–could influence the success he or she has in an undergraduate engineering program. More specifically, the MCCS is a conceptual model for constructing and evaluating support systems and individual student interventions that prioritize undergraduate engineering students. Within my study, I also identified several classifications of ESSCs and highlighted some pros and cons associated with various classifications and configurations. Ultimately, this research combines student-retention theory with student-support practice in a way that could facilitate future collaborations among educational researchers and student-support practitioners. Advisors/Committee Members: Matusovich, Holly (committeechair), Watford, Bevlee A. (committee member), Burge, Penny L. (committee member), Paretti, Marie C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: diversity; retention; co-curricular support

…practices such as co-curricular support. Co-curricular support refers to university-provided… …services. ! Figure 1 – Institutional Positioning of Co-curricular Support While the practice of… …providing students with co-curricular support has been evaluated, theories (and scholarship… …x29; of co-curricular support have not been as thoroughly investigated. Cocurricular support… …the area of co-curricular support is historically practice-oriented and much of the existing… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee Jr, W. C. (2015). Providing Co-Curricular Support: A Multi-Case Study of Engineering Student Support Centers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/51680

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee Jr, Walter Curtis. “Providing Co-Curricular Support: A Multi-Case Study of Engineering Student Support Centers.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/51680.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee Jr, Walter Curtis. “Providing Co-Curricular Support: A Multi-Case Study of Engineering Student Support Centers.” 2015. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Lee Jr WC. Providing Co-Curricular Support: A Multi-Case Study of Engineering Student Support Centers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/51680.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee Jr WC. Providing Co-Curricular Support: A Multi-Case Study of Engineering Student Support Centers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/51680

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