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You searched for subject:(clear zone). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Iowa State University

1. Sax, Christian Ryan. Clear Zone - A synthesis of practice and an evaluation of the benefits of meeting the ten-foot clear zone goal on urban streets.

Degree: 2008, Iowa State University

In urban communities, there are often limited amounts of right-of-way available for establishing a large setback distance from the curb for fixed objects. Urban communities must constantly weigh the cost of purchasing additional right-of-way for clear zones against the risk of fixed object crashes. From 2004 to 2006, this type of crash on curbed roads represented 15% of all fatal crashes and 3% of all crashes in the state of Iowa. Many states have kept the current minimum AASHTO recommendations as their minimum clear zone standards; however, other states have decided that these recommendations are insufficient and have increased the required minimum clear zone distance to better suit the judgment of local designers. This thesis presents research on the effects of the clear zone on urban curbed streets. The research was conducted in two phases. The first phase involved a synthesis of practice that included a literature review and a survey of practices in jurisdictions that have developmental and historical patterns similar to those of Iowa. The second phase involved investigating the benefits of a 10 ft clear zone, which included examining urban corridors in Iowa that meet or do not meet the 10 ft clear zone goal. The results of this study indicate that a consistent fixed object offset results in a reduction in the number of fixed object crashes, a 5 ft clear zone is most effective when the goal is to minimize the number of fixed object crashes, and a 3 ft clear zone is most effective when the goal is to minimize the cost of fixed object crashes.

Subjects/Keywords: clear zone; clear zone enforcement; fixed object offset; state of practice; urban clear zone; Civil and Environmental Engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Sax, C. R. (2008). Clear Zone - A synthesis of practice and an evaluation of the benefits of meeting the ten-foot clear zone goal on urban streets. (Thesis). Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10932

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sax, Christian Ryan. “Clear Zone - A synthesis of practice and an evaluation of the benefits of meeting the ten-foot clear zone goal on urban streets.” 2008. Thesis, Iowa State University. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10932.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sax, Christian Ryan. “Clear Zone - A synthesis of practice and an evaluation of the benefits of meeting the ten-foot clear zone goal on urban streets.” 2008. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Sax CR. Clear Zone - A synthesis of practice and an evaluation of the benefits of meeting the ten-foot clear zone goal on urban streets. [Internet] [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2008. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10932.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sax CR. Clear Zone - A synthesis of practice and an evaluation of the benefits of meeting the ten-foot clear zone goal on urban streets. [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2008. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/10932

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Fitzpatrick, Cole D. The Effect of Roadside Elements on Driver Behavior and Run-Off-the-Road Crash Severity.

Degree: MS, Civil Engineering, 2013, University of Massachusetts

Roadside vegetation provides numerous environmental and psychological benefits to drivers. Previous studies have shown that natural landscapes can effectively lower crash rates and cause less stress and frustration to the driver. However, run-off-the-road crashes resulting in a collision with a tree are twice as likely to result in a fatality, thus reinforcing the need to examine the placement of vegetation within the clear zone. This study explores the relationship between the size of the clear zone and the presence of roadside vegetation on selected driver attributes, including both driver speed and lateral positioning. To evaluate the effect on the driver speed selection process, a static evaluation was employed. Completed by more than 100 drivers, the static evaluation was utilized to gather speed selections on both real and virtual roads containing four combinations of clear zone size and roadside vegetation density. Additionally, field data was collected to validate the findings of the static evaluation and to determine the extent to which roadside vegetation impacts driving attributes. When presented with a large clear zone, drivers positioned the vehicle further from the edge of the road as the vegetation density increased. Furthermore, the speeds observed in the field correlated with the speeds that participants selected when watching a video of the same road. Finally, the UMassSafe Traffic Safety Data Warehouse was utilized to link crash and roadway data, allowing for an in-depth analysis of run-off-the-road (ROR) crash severity. The results of this study further demonstrate the nature of the relationship between clear zone design and driver behavior. Advisors/Committee Members: Michael A. Knodler.

Subjects/Keywords: run-off-the-road; clear zone; roadside trees; vegetation; driving simulator; roadside vegetation; Other Civil and Environmental Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fitzpatrick, C. D. (2013). The Effect of Roadside Elements on Driver Behavior and Run-Off-the-Road Crash Severity. (Masters Thesis). University of Massachusetts. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umass.edu/theses/1037

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fitzpatrick, Cole D. “The Effect of Roadside Elements on Driver Behavior and Run-Off-the-Road Crash Severity.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Massachusetts. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://scholarworks.umass.edu/theses/1037.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fitzpatrick, Cole D. “The Effect of Roadside Elements on Driver Behavior and Run-Off-the-Road Crash Severity.” 2013. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Fitzpatrick CD. The Effect of Roadside Elements on Driver Behavior and Run-Off-the-Road Crash Severity. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Massachusetts; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umass.edu/theses/1037.

Council of Science Editors:

Fitzpatrick CD. The Effect of Roadside Elements on Driver Behavior and Run-Off-the-Road Crash Severity. [Masters Thesis]. University of Massachusetts; 2013. Available from: https://scholarworks.umass.edu/theses/1037


Clemson University

3. Bendigeri, Vijay. Analysis of factors contributing to roadside tree crashes in South Carolina.

Degree: MS, Civil Engineering, 2009, Clemson University

The state of South Carolina has experienced a large number of fatalities and injuries resulting from run off the road tree related crashes. According to 2008 FARS data tree related fixed object fatal crashes in South Carolina (65%) are more than double that of the national (25.8%). Thus, trees are much bigger proportion of all roadside hazards in South Carolina than nationally. In order to achieve a safer roadside which is favorable to the road user, factors contributing to the tree related crashes should be critically analyzed to determine suitable safety improvements. This research aims at qualitatively and quantitatively assessing tree related crashes in SC and performing an in depth study of the problem to determine potential countermeasures to increase safety of the roadside environment. Various descriptive statistics were computed to determine any significant contribution of crash characteristics using the police accident reports database obtained from SCDOT from the years 2004 to 2006. Detail analysis of clear zone adequacy and possible slope issues were performed using the roadside inventory data collected from 'Support for Elimination of Roadside Hazards' project. The analysis revealed that tree related crashes in SC were predominantly related to young male drivers, secondary roads and speeding. Over a large portion of fatal crashes involved young male drivers speeding under the influence of alcohol/drugs during poor visibility or dark conditions. Clear zone adequacy analysis revealed that majority of the sites did not meet minimum clear zone requirements indicating, if a tree-crash pattern exists, it is likely that minimum clear zones are not met. A larger part of the sites analyzed had traversable side slopes and clear zone width was the only problem. Advisors/Committee Members: Ogle, Jennifer H, Sarasua , Wayne A, Chowdhury , Mashrur A.

Subjects/Keywords: Clear zone safety; Fixed object crashes; Tree Crashes; Civil Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bendigeri, V. (2009). Analysis of factors contributing to roadside tree crashes in South Carolina. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/711

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bendigeri, Vijay. “Analysis of factors contributing to roadside tree crashes in South Carolina.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/711.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bendigeri, Vijay. “Analysis of factors contributing to roadside tree crashes in South Carolina.” 2009. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Bendigeri V. Analysis of factors contributing to roadside tree crashes in South Carolina. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/711.

Council of Science Editors:

Bendigeri V. Analysis of factors contributing to roadside tree crashes in South Carolina. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2009. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/711

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