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You searched for subject:(childhood migration transitions). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Temple University

1. Seeger-diNovi, Brunhild Brigitte. Eastern European Immigrant Youth Identity Formation and Adaptation in an Urban University Context.

Degree: PhD, 2011, Temple University

Sociology

This study examines the childhood emigration, cultural and linguistic transitions and adaptation pathways of Eastern European immigrant students on an urban university campus. Although Eastern Europeans and immigrant children represent a substantial segment of the immigrant population in the U.S. they are understudied groups. After the collapse of the Soviet Union large numbers of migrants emigrated from the former Soviet Republics, but less is known about their experiences compared to other immigrant groups. Immigrant children have historically come to the U.S. since its inception but compared to the adult experience their status has been rendered ambiguous and their experiences marginalized to such an extent that they have largely been invisible in the literature. Commonly children are referred to as "children of immigrants" rather than assigned their own category of "immigrant children." While it is generally acknowledged that primary socialization of children influence their secondary socialization, the influences of child migrants' inculcation in the first culture, migration, acculturation and integration experiences with associated emotions have not been sufficiently considered. There is a general assumption in much of the immigrant scholarships that the cultural influences of the first country on child migrants are essentially negated by the acculturation process in the U.S., and this conjecture leads scholars to construct various generational categories that collapse immigrant children with the second generation native-born youth in their analysis thereby potentially skewing or obscuring critical outcome information. Since immigrant children's voices have largely been missing in the research process, through 34 in-depth interviews with Eastern European immigrant college students, we examined the extent to which the child migrants experienced the migration dislocation and incorporation as well as the possible lasting consequences in their adaptation pathways, self-identifications, social interaction, and standpoints on societal issues associated with emotional acculturation. Collectively, the Russian and Ukrainian immigrant students' narratives about their college experience indicated that they were meeting with success academically, were focused on individual goals, expressed appreciation for diversity, and were integrated into the social and professional organization on the university campus. However, most of the participants who emigrated during childhood reported that they had difficult or traumatic migration transitions in their first U.S. schools and neighborhoods, and often they recounted emotionally the memories of these profound events associated with their acculturation during the interviews. As a group, the Eastern European students expressed that both positive and negative immigration and transitional experiences, perspectives gained from the shared struggle with their parents, openness to diversity, achievement orientation, and work ethic are some of the differentiating…

Advisors/Committee Members: Grasmuck, Sherri, Vila, Pablo, Espinal, Rosario, Goode, Judith.

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; Social Psychology; adaptation pathways; childhood migration transitions; Eastern European youth; emotional acculturation; higher education; immigrant children

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Seeger-diNovi, B. B. (2011). Eastern European Immigrant Youth Identity Formation and Adaptation in an Urban University Context. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,145949

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Seeger-diNovi, Brunhild Brigitte. “Eastern European Immigrant Youth Identity Formation and Adaptation in an Urban University Context.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,145949.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Seeger-diNovi, Brunhild Brigitte. “Eastern European Immigrant Youth Identity Formation and Adaptation in an Urban University Context.” 2011. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Seeger-diNovi BB. Eastern European Immigrant Youth Identity Formation and Adaptation in an Urban University Context. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,145949.

Council of Science Editors:

Seeger-diNovi BB. Eastern European Immigrant Youth Identity Formation and Adaptation in an Urban University Context. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2011. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,145949


University of Oxford

2. Vogler, Pia Maria. Translocal identities : an ethnographic account of the political economy of childhood transitions in northern Thailand.

Degree: PhD, 2010, University of Oxford

This thesis examines Karen childhood transitions in a context of expansion of the cash economy, formal education and modern institutions. Since the 1960s, Thai state development has had a significant impact on the organisation of work and learning among highland populations. Today, household economies largely depend on cash income and children aspire towards an adult life in which paid work is central. Formal education is highly valued as a means to reach this goal. Children often migrate for education to better-resourced locations and access scholarships provided by national and international institutions. On the basis of 12 months of ethnographic fieldwork undertaken between October 2007 and September 2009, the thesis seeks to understand the effects of globalisation on politically and economically marginalized children in northern Thailand through the lens of changing modes of production and learning. Findings indicate that children’s migration for education reflects broad political economic inequalities among Karen households as well as between them and mainstream Thai lowland populations. International dimensions of unequal relations are revealed in local peoples’ collective negotiations with Japanese and Catholic Christian NGOs. Although socio-cultural constructs like ‘gender’, ‘generation’, and ‘ethnicity’ shape Karen childhoods, this study found that their economic and political status are more fundamental in shaping all aspects of their social lives, including their socio-cultural identities. Childhood transitions emerge as multidimensional learning processes towards mastery of ‘translocal identities’, the skill to manage identities and relationships across multiple spaces and institutions. This is a culturally valued skill evidenced when minority children tactfully negotiate differing modes of compliance, resistance, and adaptation, especially in the domains of work and education. Thus, children participate in the moulding of local versions of the modern political economy of northern Thailand.

Subjects/Keywords: 305; Asia : Economic and Social History : History of Asia & Far East : History of childhood : Anthropology : Comparative and international education : Early and Child learning : Children and youth : Ethnic minorities and ethnicity : Thailand : childhood : transitions : anthropology : migration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vogler, P. M. (2010). Translocal identities : an ethnographic account of the political economy of childhood transitions in northern Thailand. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oxford. Retrieved from http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:046dc27e-fa91-4f1d-9e1f-0ce057db6ebb ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.534300

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vogler, Pia Maria. “Translocal identities : an ethnographic account of the political economy of childhood transitions in northern Thailand.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oxford. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:046dc27e-fa91-4f1d-9e1f-0ce057db6ebb ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.534300.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vogler, Pia Maria. “Translocal identities : an ethnographic account of the political economy of childhood transitions in northern Thailand.” 2010. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Vogler PM. Translocal identities : an ethnographic account of the political economy of childhood transitions in northern Thailand. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oxford; 2010. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:046dc27e-fa91-4f1d-9e1f-0ce057db6ebb ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.534300.

Council of Science Editors:

Vogler PM. Translocal identities : an ethnographic account of the political economy of childhood transitions in northern Thailand. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oxford; 2010. Available from: http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:046dc27e-fa91-4f1d-9e1f-0ce057db6ebb ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.534300

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