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You searched for subject:(character friendship). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Oklahoma

1. Hoyos-Valdés, Diana. Friendship and the Cultivation of Virtue.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Oklahoma

Most theories about the cultivation of virtue fall under the general umbrella of the role model approach, according to which virtue is acquired by emulating role models, and where those role models are usually conceived of as superior in some relevant respect to the learners. I will argue here that although we need role models to cultivate virtue, they are not sufficient. We also need good and close relationships with people who are not our superiors. I draw special attention to the notion of character friendship as conceived by Aristotle, as an antidote for the common misleading overemphasis on role models. My primary goal is to show how much we stand to gain by including character friendship in our account of virtue cultivation. Friendship is a close relationship characterized by mutual appreciation, well-wishing, and mutual acknowledgment of such appreciation and well-wishing. Character friendship is a friendship grounded in the mutual appreciation of the friends’ good characters, and a basic agreement and concern for the good. I hope to show here that such a relationship (a) constitutes a unique form of experience in which we share or inhabit a substantial way of seeing with a close other; (b) facilitates a unique form of knowledge, the knowledge of a particular person (my-self and the other’s self); (c) develops other emotions important for the cultivation of virtue besides admiration, such as love, shame, trust, and hope; and (d) is a praxis in which cooperative interactions and discussions function as a bridge between habituation of virtue at home and public life. Character friendship is an experience which provides necessary elements for human cultivation of virtue that the sole experience of having a role model does not. There is empirical evidence that seems to give at least some indirect support to my thesis. According to developmental and social psychology, friendship in general is fundamental for human (moral and cognitive) development from a very early age. There are also good reasons to think adolescents know what a good friend is, an exhibit aspiration to be good friends and engage in what we call character friendships. As a consequence of this, I argue greater emphasis should be placed on the role of friendship in the context of character education. We, as adults, should acknowledge, care, and facilitate children’s and adolescent’s friendships within schools and homes, and implement some practical strategies to help them foster character friendships. Advisors/Committee Members: Zagzebski, Linda (advisor), Riggs, Wayne (committee member), Brown, Ryan (committee member), Snow, Nancy (committee member), Trachtenberg, Zev (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Role models; character friendship; character education.

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APA (6th Edition):

Hoyos-Valdés, D. (2016). Friendship and the Cultivation of Virtue. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oklahoma. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11244/34628

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hoyos-Valdés, Diana. “Friendship and the Cultivation of Virtue.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oklahoma. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11244/34628.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hoyos-Valdés, Diana. “Friendship and the Cultivation of Virtue.” 2016. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Hoyos-Valdés D. Friendship and the Cultivation of Virtue. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/34628.

Council of Science Editors:

Hoyos-Valdés D. Friendship and the Cultivation of Virtue. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oklahoma; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11244/34628


University of Texas – Austin

2. -3847-555X. Love and respect : virtue friendship in Plato's Phaedrus and Kant's Metaphysics of morals.

Degree: PhD, Philosophy, 2019, University of Texas – Austin

This paper argues, first, that, while philosophical treatments of friendship in the western tradition have typically taken Aristotle's account of virtue friendship as their starting point, we can already find, in Plato's Phaedrus, an account of friendship which comes close enough to Aristotle's in its most philosophically interesting features to be meaningfully called a virtue friendship, but with some intriguing differences, and that a close examination of this earlier account of Plato's has insights to offer us about both the moral significance of friendships of this kind, and, potentially, Plato's own philosophy. It then argues that another, perhaps even more overlooked, account of virtue friendship can be found in Kant's Metaphysics of Morals, offering us a picture of the moral significance that this kind of friendship can have across very different ethical systems, and also, perhaps, an illuminating perspective from which to approach Kant's own conception of virtue. Advisors/Committee Members: Woodruff, Paul, 1943- (advisor), Biow, Douglas G (committee member), Dancy, Jonathan (committee member), Deigh, John (committee member), Dever, Joshua (committee member), White, Stephen A (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Virtue friendship; Character friendship; Friendship; Philosophy of friendship; Phaedrus; Plato; Philosophy of love; The Metaphysics of morals; Kant; Doctrine of virtue; Friendship and self-knowledge; Self-knowledge; Friendship and self knowledge; Knowledge of souls; Kantian virtue ethics; Kantian theory of virtue; Kant's virtue ethics; Kant's theory of virtue; Kant's philosophy of friendship; Kantian theory of friendship; Kantian philosophy of friendship; Kant's virtue friendship; Kantian virtue friendship; Virtue friendship in Kant; Virtue friendship in Plato; Character friendship in Kant; Character friendship in Plato; Kant on friendship; Plato on friendship; Platonic virtue friendship; Platonic character friendship

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-3847-555X. (2019). Love and respect : virtue friendship in Plato's Phaedrus and Kant's Metaphysics of morals. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/3120

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-3847-555X. “Love and respect : virtue friendship in Plato's Phaedrus and Kant's Metaphysics of morals.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/3120.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-3847-555X. “Love and respect : virtue friendship in Plato's Phaedrus and Kant's Metaphysics of morals.” 2019. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-3847-555X. Love and respect : virtue friendship in Plato's Phaedrus and Kant's Metaphysics of morals. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/3120.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-3847-555X. Love and respect : virtue friendship in Plato's Phaedrus and Kant's Metaphysics of morals. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/3120

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


University of Florida

3. Bianchi, Melissa. Fetishism in Batman Villainesses.

Degree: 2010, University of Florida

With the publication of Gotham City Sirens, DC Comics transformed Batman’s three most nefarious villainesses—Catwoman, Poison Ivy, and Harley Quinn—into the most unlikely of protagonist trios. In unfolding the narratives of these female characters, Gotham City Sirens seamlessly shifts the status of the Sirens from lone masked marauders to a deeply united sisterhood. Strangely, their friendship, though sometimes strained, is notably successful despite character histories of shared antagonism towards each another. As such, one has to wonder, why are these female characters allied in this way, and how might their narrative and graphic representations allow for this collaborative function within the narrative? The answer, I propose, lies in the nature of their costumed personas. In light of Lorraine Gamman and Merja Makinen’s feminine theory of the fetish—a revision to the Freudian theory of trauma and fetishism—one may re-read the costumed persona as a fetish to better explain the Sirens’ alignment. Under such a reading, the costumed persona is oriented by a trauma and a psychological defense against its effects, becoming a manifestation and reinterpretation of the Siren-as-subject. The common fetish structure of their costumed personas is what successfully binds Catwoman, Poison Ivy, and Harley Quinn together. ( en )

Subjects/Keywords: Comic books; Explanation theories; Friendship; Ivy; Narratives; Persona; Poisons; Protagonists; Sirens; Trios; Catwoman (Fictitious character); DC Comics, Inc.; Fetishism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bianchi, M. (2010). Fetishism in Batman Villainesses. (Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00059687

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bianchi, Melissa. “Fetishism in Batman Villainesses.” 2010. Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00059687.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bianchi, Melissa. “Fetishism in Batman Villainesses.” 2010. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Bianchi M. Fetishism in Batman Villainesses. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Florida; 2010. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00059687.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bianchi M. Fetishism in Batman Villainesses. [Thesis]. University of Florida; 2010. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00059687

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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