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You searched for subject:(carbon nanotube junctions). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Rice University

1. Yang, Yang. Computational study of structural and mechanical properties of two-dimensional nanomaterials and their derivatives.

Degree: PhD, Engineering, 2016, Rice University

Two-dimensional Nanomaterials have been demonstrated to show superior properties and promising potential for applications. In this work, we investigate the structures and mechanical properties of several two-dimensional nanomaterials and their derivatives using various computational simulation methods, including boron, carbon nanotube, graphene, and boron nitride. The first part of the thesis focuses on the boron nanostructures. We report a comprehensive first-principles study of the structural and chemical properties of the recently discovered B40 cage. We also discover here a preferred structure of two-dimensional boron using the cluster expansion method and find it to be most table on reactive Cu and Ni. In the second part, an extensive analysis of the graphene grain boundaries is conducted and it is revealed that the sinuous grain boundaries based on dislocation theory and first-principles calculations can be energetically optimal once the global grain boundary line cannot bisect the tilt angle. In addition, we demonstrate here a contrasting behavior for grain boundaries in hybrid two-dimensional materials, which tend to be non-bisector and obey a universal law to optimally match the heterogeneous grains. In the last part, we propose an approach for determining the Gaussian bending modulus of graphene by utilizing carbon torus, whose topology enables its bending energy to be extracted from the coupled in-plane strain energy. Furthermore, we report a unique method to locally determine the mechanical response of individual covalent junctions between carbon nanotubes. Targeted synthesis of desired junction geometries can therefore provide a “structural alphabet” for construction of macroscopic carbon nanotube networks with tunable mechanical response. Advisors/Committee Members: Yakobson, Boris I. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: carbon nanotube junctions; atomistic modeling; boron cluster; two-dimensional material; mechanics; grain boundary; Gaussian stiffness

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APA (6th Edition):

Yang, Y. (2016). Computational study of structural and mechanical properties of two-dimensional nanomaterials and their derivatives. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rice University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95562

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yang, Yang. “Computational study of structural and mechanical properties of two-dimensional nanomaterials and their derivatives.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Rice University. Accessed September 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95562.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yang, Yang. “Computational study of structural and mechanical properties of two-dimensional nanomaterials and their derivatives.” 2016. Web. 20 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Yang Y. Computational study of structural and mechanical properties of two-dimensional nanomaterials and their derivatives. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rice University; 2016. [cited 2019 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95562.

Council of Science Editors:

Yang Y. Computational study of structural and mechanical properties of two-dimensional nanomaterials and their derivatives. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rice University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95562


Rice University

2. Ozden, Sehmus. Advanced Three-Dimensional Structural Carbon Nanomaterials.

Degree: PhD, Engineering, 2016, Rice University

Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, are most intensively investigated carbon allotropes because of their outstanding physical and chemical properties. Recently, it has been realized that threedimensional (3D) carbon-based structures with nanoscale interconnection provide the remarkably improved properties required for critically needed applications. The properties of 3D-CNTs and graphene architectures can be tweaked for various applications. Therefore, 3D carbon-based solids with nanoscale intermolecular junctions present an exciting research area and provide opportunities for fabrication of various 3D-macroscopic architectures with unexpected properties. The creation of nanoengineered 3D-macroscopic structures in a scalable synthetic process still remains a challenge. The fundamental problem is the difficulty in introducing atomic-scale junctions between individual nanoscale structures so that they can be organized as covalently interconnected nanostructured networks with controllable physical characteristics, such as density and porosity. Here, 3D structures have been created using chemical vapor deposition method, solutionbased chemistry technique and welding method via hypervelocity impact method to generate atomic-scale junction between carbon nanostructures. The scalable fabrication of 3D macroscopic scaffolds with different hierarchical interconnected structures and soldering-like junctions between CNTs using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is reported. These intermolecular junctions of CNTs result in a high thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, excellent mechanical properties, as well as excellent structural stability in a concentrated acid, base, and organic solvents. The CNT solids with such tremendous properties represent the next generation of carbon-based materials with a broad range of potential applications; we demonstrate here a couple such utility impact damping, removal oil from contaminated water and as a marker for the oil industry. Additionally, in situ nano-indentation inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine the mechanical response of individual covalent junction, formed in different configurations such as “X”, “Y” and “” shapes between individual CNTs. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations are used to support the experimental results as well as to study the deformation behavior of junctions. Vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotube forests (NTF) synthesized by water assisted CVD method and both sides functionalized with different functionalities as hydrophobic and hydrophilic. The produced hygroscopic nanotube forest demonstrate for water harvesting from air. The second approach has been used in this work is solution chemistry to generate crosslinking nanotube structures. The scalable synthesis of 3D macroscopic solids made of covalently connected nanotubes via Suzuki cross-coupling reaction, a well-known carbon-carbon covalent bond forming reaction in organic chemistry. The resulting CNTs… Advisors/Committee Members: Ajayan, Pulickel M. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Nanotubes; Carbon; Three-Dimensional; Mechanical properties; Water harvesting; Functionalization; Unzipping; High impact; Unzipping Mechanism; Stiffness; Intermolecular junctions; 3D CNT solids; Carbon nanotube junction; picoindentation; in situ testing; atomistic modeling; oil-water separation; chemical cross-linking; Suzuki reaction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ozden, S. (2016). Advanced Three-Dimensional Structural Carbon Nanomaterials. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rice University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95520

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ozden, Sehmus. “Advanced Three-Dimensional Structural Carbon Nanomaterials.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Rice University. Accessed September 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95520.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ozden, Sehmus. “Advanced Three-Dimensional Structural Carbon Nanomaterials.” 2016. Web. 20 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Ozden S. Advanced Three-Dimensional Structural Carbon Nanomaterials. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rice University; 2016. [cited 2019 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95520.

Council of Science Editors:

Ozden S. Advanced Three-Dimensional Structural Carbon Nanomaterials. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rice University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95520

3. Do, Jae Won. Electrostatic transfer of graphene grown on copper foil and nanosoldering of carbon nanotube junctions.

Degree: MS, 1200, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This thesis presents novel techniques to enhance the key processing and device issues related to carbon nanoelectronics. Particularly, the presented techniques involve transferring graphene grown on copper foil using electrostatic force and improving the junction resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks by nanosoldering. Typically, transferring graphene grown on metal substrates involves wet etching steps in order to separate graphene from its metal growth substrates. During these wet etching steps, however, residues and wrinkles can be easily introduced in graphene and degrade its quality. By using electrostatic force instead, we attempt to transfer graphene grown on copper foil without involving the wet etching steps, thereby simplifying the transfer technique and improving the quality of transferred graphene. In addition, we further study the interaction between graphene and the copper substrate. For nanosoldering of CNT networks, we propose a novel method to locally deposit metals at the junctions of CNTs in order to lower the junction resistance. As these junctions are the most-resistive regions, we are able to locally heat the junctions by passing currents through the CNT network. In the presence of metal precursors in a vacuum environment, we attempt to deposit metals locally and selectively at these junctions. Our results show that the metals indeed start to form locally at the inter-tube junctions, which indicates that the junctions are the spots of high thermal resistance. The effects of nanosoldering these junctions seem to vary according to the types of metals deposited at the junctions, and are subjects for further study. Advisors/Committee Members: Lyding, Joseph W. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: graphene; graphene transfer; electrostatics; graphene growth; graphene on copper; carbon nanotubes; nanosoldering; carbon nanotube junctions; carbon nanotube junction resistance; local chemical vapor deposition

NANOTUBE JUNCTIONS 3.1 Background on Carbon Nanotube Networks As mentioned in Chapter 1, despite… …their quality. 3.2 Background on Carbon Nanotube Junctions While there exist several… …vacuum system. 3.4 Methodology for Nanosoldering Carbon Nanotube Junctions After wirebonding… …data will be presented with currentvoltage characteristics for the carbon nanotube devices… …carbon allotropes: 0D fullerene, 1D carbon nanotube, 2D graphene, and 3D graphite [6]… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Do, J. W. (2012). Electrostatic transfer of graphene grown on copper foil and nanosoldering of carbon nanotube junctions. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29553

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Do, Jae Won. “Electrostatic transfer of graphene grown on copper foil and nanosoldering of carbon nanotube junctions.” 2012. Thesis, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed September 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29553.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Do, Jae Won. “Electrostatic transfer of graphene grown on copper foil and nanosoldering of carbon nanotube junctions.” 2012. Web. 20 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Do JW. Electrostatic transfer of graphene grown on copper foil and nanosoldering of carbon nanotube junctions. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29553.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Do JW. Electrostatic transfer of graphene grown on copper foil and nanosoldering of carbon nanotube junctions. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29553

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.