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You searched for subject:(campus connectedness). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Arizona

1. Michael, Julia Jacquelyn. Peer Victimization in College Sorority and Fraternity Students: The Impact of Group Identity and Campus Connectedness .

Degree: 2015, University of Arizona

This study examined peer victimization, specifically indirect peer victimization and cyber victimization, in a sample of 311 college fraternity and sorority students at a large, public university in the southwestern United States. Of specific focus was the relationship between peer victimization – both within fraternity and sorority groups and between fraternity and sorority groups and outside members – and co-occurring psychological stress (i.e., anxiety, depression, stress). The potential mediating roles of group identity and campus connectedness were also examined. This study utilized the social psychological theory of Social Identity Theory to predict the relationships between the aforementioned variables. Results indicated that a majority of college fraternity and sorority students (58%) have experienced at least one instance of indirect peer victimization since being initiated into their respective organization. Collectively, the majority of respondents reported low levels of peer victimization and high levels of group identity and campus connectedness. As hypothesized, peer victimization was significantly and positively correlated with stress. In addition, higher ratings of within-group peer victimization were related to lower ratings of group identity. However, ratings of between-group peer victimization were not significantly related to ratings of group identity, which did not support the hypothesis that there would be a significant and positive correlation between the two.It was also found that campus connectedness mediated the relationship between peer victimization and Stress. Specifically, campus connectedness served as a protective factor from stress. Alternately, group identity did not protect against stress. Lastly, a specific subgroup of participants was identified as experiencing significantly high levels of peer victimization. Participants designated as "Victims" were significantly more likely to report ethnic minority status, be male, and be a fifth-year college student. Moreover, these students reported significantly higher levels of stress, and lower levels of group identity and campus connectedness. The implications of these findings for university and educational settings are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Sulkowski, Michael L (advisor), Sulkowski, Michael L. (committeemember), Eklund, Katie R. (committeemember), Morris, Richard J. (committeemember).

Subjects/Keywords: group identity; peer victimization; Social Identity Theory; School Psychology; campus connectedness

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Michael, J. J. (2015). Peer Victimization in College Sorority and Fraternity Students: The Impact of Group Identity and Campus Connectedness . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565888

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Michael, Julia Jacquelyn. “Peer Victimization in College Sorority and Fraternity Students: The Impact of Group Identity and Campus Connectedness .” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565888.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Michael, Julia Jacquelyn. “Peer Victimization in College Sorority and Fraternity Students: The Impact of Group Identity and Campus Connectedness .” 2015. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Michael JJ. Peer Victimization in College Sorority and Fraternity Students: The Impact of Group Identity and Campus Connectedness . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2015. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565888.

Council of Science Editors:

Michael JJ. Peer Victimization in College Sorority and Fraternity Students: The Impact of Group Identity and Campus Connectedness . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/565888


Texas A&M University

2. Zahn, Marion P. Campus Connectedness, Ethnic Identity, Other-Group Orientation and College Persistence Attitudes Among Laotian American College Students.

Degree: 2010, Texas A&M University

Laotian American students attending universities across the U.S. are first-, second-, and third-generation American. This generation status, along with their families' unique immigration experiences, likely impacts their adjustment to college. Data from the 2000 U.S. Census indicates a very low representation of Laotian Americans (7.6%) in the cluster of Asian Americans who have attained at least a Bachelor?s degree (42.7%). This low representation calls for further research on the Laotian American population to discover ways to increase these numbers. This study examines the mediating effect of campus connectedness on ethnic identity and college persistence attitudes and on other-group orientation and college persistence attitudes. It also examines mean group differences on campus connectedness by cultural orientation, among 82 low-land Laotian American college students. Results reveal that campus connectedness does not mediate the relationship between ethnic identity and college persistence attitudes. A mediation effect exists for campus connectedness on: 1) ethnic identity cognitive clarity (EI-clarity) and persistence and 2) other-group orientation and persistence. Mean group differences on campus connectedness by cultural orientation appear in the results. Advisors/Committee Members: Castillo, Linda G. (advisor), Brossart, Daniel F. (committee member), Burlbaw, Lynn M. (committee member), Lin, Jun-chih G. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Laotian American College Students; Campus Connectedness; College Persistence Attitudes; Ethnic Identity; Other-Group Orientation; Cultural Orientation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zahn, M. P. (2010). Campus Connectedness, Ethnic Identity, Other-Group Orientation and College Persistence Attitudes Among Laotian American College Students. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-08-7040

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zahn, Marion P. “Campus Connectedness, Ethnic Identity, Other-Group Orientation and College Persistence Attitudes Among Laotian American College Students.” 2010. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-08-7040.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zahn, Marion P. “Campus Connectedness, Ethnic Identity, Other-Group Orientation and College Persistence Attitudes Among Laotian American College Students.” 2010. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Zahn MP. Campus Connectedness, Ethnic Identity, Other-Group Orientation and College Persistence Attitudes Among Laotian American College Students. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-08-7040.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Zahn MP. Campus Connectedness, Ethnic Identity, Other-Group Orientation and College Persistence Attitudes Among Laotian American College Students. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-08-7040

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Southern California

3. Behbehani, Sara. The relationship between students’ feelings of belonging to their campus community and racial ethnic identification in undergraduate university students.

Degree: MEd, Education (Psychology & Technology), 2009, University of Southern California

The effect of belonging is a psychological need, and if this need is not satisfied it may have negative repercussions for the potential success of the individual (Maslow, 1943). The need for belonging is especially important in academic settings. The lack of fulfillment of this need may have a considerable impact for minority students (Osterman, 2000). In particular, those minority students whom highly identify with their ethnic group. An individual’s racial-ethnic identification (REI) impacts their values, cognitions, and behaviors. This identification for minority students may also affect an individual’s feelings of belonging towards their educational environment. This study used two self-report measures to examine the relationship between students’ feelings of belonging to their campus community and their REI. The results showed no significant relationship between the variables. However, future research should account for the statistical limitations of this study, including a small sample size and homogeneity of the sample. Advisors/Committee Members: Hirabayashi, Kimberly (Committee Chair), Ragusa, Gisele (Committee Member), Pensavalle, Margo T. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: campus connectedness; racial-ethnic identification; feelings of belonging; identification; culture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Behbehani, S. (2009). The relationship between students’ feelings of belonging to their campus community and racial ethnic identification in undergraduate university students. (Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/270361/rec/7158

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Behbehani, Sara. “The relationship between students’ feelings of belonging to their campus community and racial ethnic identification in undergraduate university students.” 2009. Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/270361/rec/7158.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Behbehani, Sara. “The relationship between students’ feelings of belonging to their campus community and racial ethnic identification in undergraduate university students.” 2009. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Behbehani S. The relationship between students’ feelings of belonging to their campus community and racial ethnic identification in undergraduate university students. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2009. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/270361/rec/7158.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Behbehani S. The relationship between students’ feelings of belonging to their campus community and racial ethnic identification in undergraduate university students. [Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2009. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/270361/rec/7158

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.