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You searched for subject:(cademic advising). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. McGlothlin Lester, Marlena Brooke. Understanding Academic Advising at Institutions with a First-Year Engineering Program.

Degree: PhD, Higher Education, 2019, Virginia Tech

Academic advising has been a part of United States (U.S.) colleges and universities since their inception, yet academic advising as we know it today is a relatively new profession. Over the last several decades, many colleges and universities have employed professional advisors, rather than teaching and learning faculty, to carry out the academic advising functions however little is known about the structures of these advising programs. Academic advisors often serve on the front lines (i.e., high student contact hours) and advocate for student success by supporting students in learning about their institutions, uncovering their personal and professional goals, and encouraging them to pursue life goals. However, the responsibility of academic advising and advisors varies at institutions of higher education across the country and this variation is not well understood. The purpose of this research was to better understand the structures of engineering academic advising at large four-year, primarily residential institutions with a first-year engineering program. To accomplish this purpose, the following overarching research question guided my study: How do first-year engineering programs structure academic advising, and what services, programs, and support are in place for academic advisors and students? To answer this question, I used a qualitative multi-case study design to understand the landscape of advising in first-year engineering programs and the organizational structures of their advising programs. I used Habley's Organizational Models for Academic Advising (1983) as a way to categorize the structures of academic advising and Frank's (1993) Integrated Model of Academic Advising Program Development as a conceptual framework for understanding how academic advising programs develop, the services provided, programming available, and how to enable the advisors to better support the student population. My findings include identifying: 1) several similarities between case sites' organizational structures of advising, 2) new student orientation and major exploration as main services offered at all sites, 3) a lack of formalized planning across all case sites, and 4) the prominence of advisor training with a desire to have more formal advisor recognition programs. Recommendations for future research, practice, and policy are provided along with a proposal for a new model for First-Year Engineering Advising Programs.   Advisors/Committee Members: Matusovich, Holly (committeechair), Robbins, Claire Kathleen (committee member), Kniola, David John (committee member), Smith, Kenneth Samuel (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: cademic advising; organizational structures of academic advising; advising program development; models of advising; orientation; major exploration; and advisor recognition; first-year engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McGlothlin Lester, M. B. (2019). Understanding Academic Advising at Institutions with a First-Year Engineering Program. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/89885

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McGlothlin Lester, Marlena Brooke. “Understanding Academic Advising at Institutions with a First-Year Engineering Program.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed July 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/89885.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McGlothlin Lester, Marlena Brooke. “Understanding Academic Advising at Institutions with a First-Year Engineering Program.” 2019. Web. 16 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

McGlothlin Lester MB. Understanding Academic Advising at Institutions with a First-Year Engineering Program. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2019. [cited 2019 Jul 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/89885.

Council of Science Editors:

McGlothlin Lester MB. Understanding Academic Advising at Institutions with a First-Year Engineering Program. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/89885


Liberty University

2. Poindexter, Beryle. Single-Parents’ Persistence in Pursuit of Higher Education: A Case Study.

Degree: 2017, Liberty University

The purpose of this qualitative case study is an exploratory study to examine what contributes to the failure of the persistence of non-residential single-parents pursuing a college degree. The participants of this study included ten non-residential single-parent students between the ages of 21 and 50. The site of the interviews was in the Community Assistance Agency located in central Virginia. The theoretical framework guiding this study includes both the Student Integration Model Theory by Vincent Tinto (1975) and the Human Capital Theory by Theodore Schultz (1961). This framework provides a connection that explains the obstacles that exist for non-residential single-parents pursuing a college degree, as well as identifies possible solutions that address the issues involved in the pursuit of a college degree for these parents. The following research questions guided this study: What factors contribute to the failure of a single-parent to persist in higher education? How does academic involvement facilitate persistence in single-parent students? How does social involvement impact persistence to obtain a college degree in single-parent students? Data collection included a participant demographic profile, one-on-one interviews, and a focus group session. The data analysis process was presented in five phases, which included compiling all collected data, disassembling of data, reassembling data, interpretation of coded data, and themes were created. Five themes emerged from the coded data including family responsibilities, financial issues, academic involvement, self-improvement, and social involvement on campus.

Subjects/Keywords: cademic Involvement; Advising; Childcare; Obstacles; Prsistence; Single-Parents; Curriculum and Social Inquiry; Education; Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research; Educational Psychology; Other Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Poindexter, B. (2017). Single-Parents’ Persistence in Pursuit of Higher Education: A Case Study. (Doctoral Dissertation). Liberty University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/1425

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Poindexter, Beryle. “Single-Parents’ Persistence in Pursuit of Higher Education: A Case Study.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Liberty University. Accessed July 16, 2019. http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/1425.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Poindexter, Beryle. “Single-Parents’ Persistence in Pursuit of Higher Education: A Case Study.” 2017. Web. 16 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Poindexter B. Single-Parents’ Persistence in Pursuit of Higher Education: A Case Study. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Liberty University; 2017. [cited 2019 Jul 16]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/1425.

Council of Science Editors:

Poindexter B. Single-Parents’ Persistence in Pursuit of Higher Education: A Case Study. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Liberty University; 2017. Available from: http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/1425

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