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You searched for subject:(black matriarch). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Louisville

1. Stanford, Tanisha Nicole. African American grandmothers as the black matriarch : you don't live for yourself.

Degree: MA, 2018, University of Louisville

This study examined historical and contemporary roles of African American grandmothers within the familial system, and their socio-psychological experiences. The primary method of data collection was semi-structured, conversational style interviews with an oral history aspect. There were six grandmothers interviewed, two from the midwest region of the United States, and four from the southern region. The findings reveal stories that corroborate with the literature on the role of women in African American families and that of the Black matriarch, considering their strength are not inherent but necessary. They are not born matriarchs or strong black women, they become that person within the black family structure and circumstances. Key findings suggest that the roles and responsibilities of the grandmothers were similar to that of their own mother and grandmothers, as well as some of the historical roles that black women played in white and black families. Advisors/Committee Members: Rajack-Talley, Theresa, Best, Latrica, Best, Latrica, Story, Kaila.

Subjects/Keywords: African American grandmothers; black feminist perspective; black matriarch; black family; strong black woman; African American Studies; Other Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Women's History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stanford, T. N. (2018). African American grandmothers as the black matriarch : you don't live for yourself. (Masters Thesis). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/2944 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2944

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stanford, Tanisha Nicole. “African American grandmothers as the black matriarch : you don't live for yourself.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Louisville. Accessed April 12, 2021. 10.18297/etd/2944 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2944.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stanford, Tanisha Nicole. “African American grandmothers as the black matriarch : you don't live for yourself.” 2018. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Stanford TN. African American grandmothers as the black matriarch : you don't live for yourself. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Louisville; 2018. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2944 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2944.

Council of Science Editors:

Stanford TN. African American grandmothers as the black matriarch : you don't live for yourself. [Masters Thesis]. University of Louisville; 2018. Available from: 10.18297/etd/2944 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/2944


Bucknell University

2. Waller-Peterson, Belinda M. Wom(b)anism: Reading Relationships Between the Community and the Womb in Sankofa, The Women of Brewster Place, and Corregidora.

Degree: 2010, Bucknell University

This project attempts to contribute to the various discourses within the black womanist tradition. In 1983, Alice Walker published her landmark collection of essays entitled In Search of Our Mother Gardens: Womanist Prose. At the outset of the volume, Walker defines the core concept of womanism. After a poetic four-part definition of the term womanist, Walker concludes by stating, 'womanist is to feminist as purple to lavender' (Phillips 19). Although this analogy is critically engaged, the scholarly discourse that emerged in response to Walker's proposition shapes the intellectual inner workings of this project. Certain established concepts (such as ancestral mediation or the laying on of hands) work in conjunction with my own concepts of 'wom(b)anism' and 'the communal womb' to frame the interpretive discussions throughout these pages. Wom(b)anism and the communal womb both emerge from the black feminist and womanist traditions, especially via the role of ancestral mediation but also within the contested discourses on womanism itself. I apply the two concepts (wom(b)anism and the communal womb) to my readings of Haile Gerima's Sankofa, Gloria Naylor's The Women of Brewster Place, and Gayl Jones' Corregidora. The relationship between the community and women's wombs across each of these texts construct a narrative that features ancestral mediation (or intervention), various acts of violence committed against women's bodies, and the complicated circumstances through which women heal themselves andtheir communities.

Subjects/Keywords: Ancestral Mediator; Communal Womb; Womanism; Black Feminism; Matriarch; Sankofa; The Women of Brewster Place; Corregidora; Community; Laying on of Hands; Healing

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Waller-Peterson, B. M. (2010). Wom(b)anism: Reading Relationships Between the Community and the Womb in Sankofa, The Women of Brewster Place, and Corregidora. (Thesis). Bucknell University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.bucknell.edu/masters_theses/31

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Waller-Peterson, Belinda M. “Wom(b)anism: Reading Relationships Between the Community and the Womb in Sankofa, The Women of Brewster Place, and Corregidora.” 2010. Thesis, Bucknell University. Accessed April 12, 2021. https://digitalcommons.bucknell.edu/masters_theses/31.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Waller-Peterson, Belinda M. “Wom(b)anism: Reading Relationships Between the Community and the Womb in Sankofa, The Women of Brewster Place, and Corregidora.” 2010. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Waller-Peterson BM. Wom(b)anism: Reading Relationships Between the Community and the Womb in Sankofa, The Women of Brewster Place, and Corregidora. [Internet] [Thesis]. Bucknell University; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.bucknell.edu/masters_theses/31.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Waller-Peterson BM. Wom(b)anism: Reading Relationships Between the Community and the Womb in Sankofa, The Women of Brewster Place, and Corregidora. [Thesis]. Bucknell University; 2010. Available from: https://digitalcommons.bucknell.edu/masters_theses/31

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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