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You searched for subject:(bioptic telescopic spectacles). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Zhou, Alicia Marie Powers. Predictors of Driving Exposure in Bioptic Drivers and Implications for Motor Vehicle Collision Rates.

Degree: MS, Vision Science, 2016, The Ohio State University

Purpose: For an individual not eligible for a regular driver’s license due to central visual impairment, 43 states allow for licensure with the aid of bioptic telescope spectacles (BTS). BTS consist of a small telescope lens mounted in the upper portion of a distance prescription lens. There is limited information regarding the driving exposure and road safety of bioptic drivers. The purpose of this study was to determine whether vision or demographic factors predict mileage driven in bioptic drivers and to determine a per mile motor vehicle collisions (MVC) rate.Methods: Data on visual acuity (logMAR charts), contrast sensitivity (Pelli-Robson or Mars charts), age, sex, and previous driving experience were collected retrospectively from clinic records at the Ohio State University College of Optometry. MVC data was collected from the Bureau of Motor Vehicles database. A modified version of the Driving Habits Questionnaire (Owsley et al., 1999) was administered in person or by mail, and subjects were asked to estimate their yearly mileage. Spearman correlation and Mann-Whitney U tests were performed to determine predictors of driving exposure. Per mile MVC rate was calculated and used to compared to calculated MVC rates in the general population.Results: 73 licensed Ohio bioptic drivers (48 male) were included. Mean (±SD) age was 51±16 years. Mean (min, max) binocular logMAR visual acuity was 0.66 (1.20, 0.18), or approximately 20/100. Median contrast sensitivity was 1.57 (1.00, 1.95). Reported annual mileage ranged from 100 to 90,000 miles per year, with a mean of 9,746. Age, gender, and previous (non-bioptic) driving experience were not significantly associated with estimated annual mileage. Visual acuity was inversely related to reported mileage (Spearman correlation = –0.286, P = 0.015). Contrast sensitivity was directly related to reported mileage (Spearman correlation = 0.308, P = 0.009). Glare acuity was inversely related to reported mileage (Spearman correlation = -0.261, P = 0.027). The per mile MVC rate was 15.3 MVC per 1,000,000 miles driven.Conclusion: Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and glare acuity are significant predictors of driving exposure in BTS users, with drivers with poorer vision reporting less annual mileage. While older drivers and those with worse vision report driving shorter distances from home, on average BTS users drive a similar number of overall trips. When adjusting for exposure, BTS users may be at increased risk for MVC compared to the overall population. Advisors/Committee Members: Dougherty, Bradley (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Ophthalmology; Public Health; bioptic driving; bioptic telescopic spectacles, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, motor vehicle collision rate

…60 xi List of Figures Figure 1.1. Use of Bioptic Telescopic Spectacles… …1 1.2 Bioptic Telescope Spectacles (BTS)… …2 Figure 1.2. Flow Chart of Process for Ohio Licensure and Renewal with Bioptic Telescopic… …driving privileges. 1 1.2 BIOPTIC TELESCOPE SPECTACLES 1.2.1 DESCRIPTION OF BIOPTIC TELESCOPE… …x29;. Figure 1.1 Use of Bioptic Telescope Spectacles. Diagram of BTS demonstrating the… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Zhou, A. M. P. (2016). Predictors of Driving Exposure in Bioptic Drivers and Implications for Motor Vehicle Collision Rates. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461151132

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhou, Alicia Marie Powers. “Predictors of Driving Exposure in Bioptic Drivers and Implications for Motor Vehicle Collision Rates.” 2016. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461151132.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhou, Alicia Marie Powers. “Predictors of Driving Exposure in Bioptic Drivers and Implications for Motor Vehicle Collision Rates.” 2016. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Zhou AMP. Predictors of Driving Exposure in Bioptic Drivers and Implications for Motor Vehicle Collision Rates. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461151132.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhou AMP. Predictors of Driving Exposure in Bioptic Drivers and Implications for Motor Vehicle Collision Rates. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2016. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1461151132


The Ohio State University

2. Dougherty, Bradley Edward. Visual and Demographic Factors in Bioptic Driving Training and Road Safety.

Degree: PhD, Vision Science, 2013, The Ohio State University

Bioptic telescopic spectacles (BTS) allow people with vision impairment to obtain driving licensure even when their visual acuity does not meet normal state standards. BTS are spectacles with a small telescope implanted in one or both of the lenses. The telescope is used for brief periods during driving to spot distant targets such as road signs and traffic signals. The study described in this dissertation examines visual and demographic associations among obtaining a bioptic driving license, training and road testing results, and motor vehicle collisions in patients with low vision. The study also compares the collision rate of bioptic drivers to that of a control group of non-bioptic drivers matched on age and sex. A retrospective study of medical records was completed for patients examined for entry into the Ohio bioptic driving program at the College of Optometry at The Ohio State University over a five year period. Data were collected on visual factors, documented driver training, licensure testing results, and post-licensure driving record. No significant associations were found among visual and demographic factors and obtaining licensure after an initial vision examination. Several factors were significantly associated with the amount of training documented for candidates for licensure, including age and previous non-bioptic driving experience. The amount of training documented was associated with road testing results, but not with driving safety after licensure. Previous driving experience was also significantly associated with occurrence of motor vehicle collisions (MVC) in bioptic drivers, with drivers without previous experience having approximately 2.5 times as many collisions per year of licensure than those with previous experience. Other significant associations with MVC in bioptic drivers included age and the number of non-collision related convictions. Nystagmus was independently associated with MVC, but no other patient visual factors were associated with MVC. The rate of MVC per year for bioptic drivers was significantly greater than that of a group of control drivers matched on age and sex. This is consistent with past studies of bioptic collision rates. It is also consistent with past findings that groups with various medical restrictions have higher collision rates than control groups. This study does not address driving exposure in terms of actual mileage driven by bioptic drivers, and so no conclusions can be made regarding the rate of collision per mile driven for bioptic drivers, the visual or demographic associations with that figure, or how bioptic drivers compare to non-bioptic drivers in terms of collisions per mile driven. Advisors/Committee Members: Raasch, Thomas (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Ophthalmology; Optics; Public Health; Public Policy; Transportation; Biomedical Research; Health Sciences; bioptic driving; low vision; visual impairment; vision; bioptic telescopic spectacles; visual acuity; contrast sensitivity; motor vehicle collision; visual field; training; road test; driving performance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dougherty, B. E. (2013). Visual and Demographic Factors in Bioptic Driving Training and Road Safety. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366284836

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dougherty, Bradley Edward. “Visual and Demographic Factors in Bioptic Driving Training and Road Safety.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366284836.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dougherty, Bradley Edward. “Visual and Demographic Factors in Bioptic Driving Training and Road Safety.” 2013. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Dougherty BE. Visual and Demographic Factors in Bioptic Driving Training and Road Safety. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366284836.

Council of Science Editors:

Dougherty BE. Visual and Demographic Factors in Bioptic Driving Training and Road Safety. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2013. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366284836

3. Mathias, Amber R. The Effect of Bioptic Telescopic Spectacles Use on Sign Identification, Velocity, and Lane Deviation in a Driving Simulator with Central Vision Impairment.

Degree: MS, Vision Science, 2018, The Ohio State University

Purpose: The use of bioptic telescopic spectacles (BTS) to obtain licensure for driving is currently legal in over 42 states, yet questions remain about performance and safety. The effect of BTS on sign identification distance is unknown. Previous studies reported worse ratings for lane position and steering steadiness in bioptic drivers, but were unable to report differences attributable to BTS use due to safety concerns with on-road testing. This study utilizes a driving simulator to compare sign identification performance with and without BTS use, and to compare bioptic and normally-sighted drivers. Velocity, lane position, and lane deviations are also examined. Additionally, self-ratings of quality of driving, avoidance, dependence, and driving space are examined. Methods: Bioptic drivers and controls were recruited from The Ohio State University College of Optometry. Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and visual field were assessed. The study was completed in a six-degree-of-freedom driving simulator equipped with a 260° curved front screen simulator with side mirror LCD displays and a screen seen through the rear-view mirror. Subjects completed a 32,000 meter straight four-lane highway course with light traffic and a speed limit of 45 mph. The main task was to press a button on the steering wheel whenever a target city name or route number road sign was confidently identified amongst distractor signs. This task was completed twice, once using the BTS and once without. Paired t-tests were used to analyze differences in sign recognition distance, velocity, lane position and steering entropy. Differences in the number and duration of lane deviations were also examined. Results: Twelve bioptic drivers and six controls participated. Mean±SD bioptic driver age was 56±17 and 55±10 for controls. Mean logMAR VA OU for bioptic drivers was 0.80±0.17 (20/125) and mean log CS was 1.48±0.16. Mean VA with telescope was 0.21±0.10 (20/32). The mean sign identification distance for control drivers was 239±58 meters compared to 157±77 meters for bioptic drivers with BTS and 69±68 meters without. Bioptic drivers had more lane deviations while using the BTS compared to without (p = 0.18). Bioptic drivers had greater SD of lane position (p < .001), steering entropy (p = 0.005), and SD of velocity (p < .001) than controls. There were significant increases in SD of lane position (p = 0.018) and SD of velocity (p = 0.013) with BTS use in bioptic drivers. Conclusion: Bioptic telescopic spectacles increased the distance at which bioptic drivers could correctly identify road signs. Bioptic drivers generally had more variability in lane position and speed control and less smooth steering than controls drivers. Variability was greater with use of the BTS than without in bioptic drivers. Bioptic drivers also had more lane deviations than controls and more with the BTS than without. Bioptic drivers also rated their driving ability more poorly, had higher avoidance scores, more dependence on others, and a smaller driving space than controls… Advisors/Committee Members: Dougherty, Bradley (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Ophthalmology; Optics; Driving; low vision; optometry; bioptic telescopic spectacles; simulator, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual field

…1 Bioptic Telescopic Spectacles and Driving with Visual Impairment… …50 x List of Figures Figure 1: Bioptic telescopic spectacles… …with central vision impairment. Bioptic Telescopic Spectacles and Driving with Visual… …Impairment Bioptic telescopic spectacles (BTS) are a two part, or bi-optic system… …1970s Feinbloom then developed new designs of bioptic telescopic spectacles that are similar… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mathias, A. R. (2018). The Effect of Bioptic Telescopic Spectacles Use on Sign Identification, Velocity, and Lane Deviation in a Driving Simulator with Central Vision Impairment. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu152303259493087

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mathias, Amber R. “The Effect of Bioptic Telescopic Spectacles Use on Sign Identification, Velocity, and Lane Deviation in a Driving Simulator with Central Vision Impairment.” 2018. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 24, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu152303259493087.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mathias, Amber R. “The Effect of Bioptic Telescopic Spectacles Use on Sign Identification, Velocity, and Lane Deviation in a Driving Simulator with Central Vision Impairment.” 2018. Web. 24 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Mathias AR. The Effect of Bioptic Telescopic Spectacles Use on Sign Identification, Velocity, and Lane Deviation in a Driving Simulator with Central Vision Impairment. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 24]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu152303259493087.

Council of Science Editors:

Mathias AR. The Effect of Bioptic Telescopic Spectacles Use on Sign Identification, Velocity, and Lane Deviation in a Driving Simulator with Central Vision Impairment. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu152303259493087

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