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You searched for subject:(biological specimens). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of KwaZulu-Natal

1. Mwaka, Erisa Sabakaki. Stakeholder perspectives on informed consent and ethics review of research involving human specimen resource repositories (biobanks) in South Africa : a quantitative study.

Degree: 2017, University of KwaZulu-Natal

On-going research has made the use of human biological materials and genetic material/data for biomedical research an area of high interest to researchers, bioethicists, philosophers, lawyers and various regulatory bodies. In this era of globalization, there are profound ethical, legal and social implications for the evolving nature of biobank research; these have to be considered during the ethics review process. The main objective of this study was to explore stakeholders’ perspectives of informed consent and ethics review of biobank research in South Africa, with the aim of obtaining information that could contribute to the harmonization of ethical guidelines of the consent process and biobank governance. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that employed a positivist approach involving qualitative data collection methods. The study was conducted at Stellenbosch University, the University of KwaZulu-Natal, and seven research ethics committees in the KwaZulu-Natal and Western Cape provinces in South Africa. A purposive sampling technique was used to recruit significant stakeholders in biobank research in South Africa. Data was collected using self-administered online survey instruments. Completion of the survey implied consent. Quantitative data were summarized using descriptive summary statistics. Conventional content analysis was used for data collected from open ended questions. The response rate was low; 19 research ethics committee members and 62 researchers and other stakeholders participated in the study. All stakeholders agreed that there is need for functional regulatory frameworks to govern biobank research, particularly the strengthening of research ethics committees, to ensure comprehensive ethics review of biobank-based research. There were several areas of agreement and divergence in respondents’ perspectives on the collection, storage and future use of human biological materials. There was no consensus on the issue of re-consent and the likelihood of donor identification and harm during the use of human biological materials for secondary research. Stakeholders also identified a number of challenges in the ethics review process and the sharing of human biological materials. Generally, the attitude of research ethics committee members, researchers and other stakeholders on informed consent, ethics review of biobank research, and the export and sharing of de-identified HBM is positive and ethically informed. Stakeholders believe that there is need for robust regulatory frameworks to govern the collection, storage, sharing and future use of HBM both within South Africa and across borders. Several recommendations are proposed that could contribute to the harmonization of ethical guidelines on the relevant consent process and biobank governance. Advisors/Committee Members: Horn, Lyn. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Informed consents.; Researchers.; Biobank.; Research Ethics Committees.; Biological specimens.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mwaka, E. S. (2017). Stakeholder perspectives on informed consent and ethics review of research involving human specimen resource repositories (biobanks) in South Africa : a quantitative study. (Thesis). University of KwaZulu-Natal. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10413/14456

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mwaka, Erisa Sabakaki. “Stakeholder perspectives on informed consent and ethics review of research involving human specimen resource repositories (biobanks) in South Africa : a quantitative study.” 2017. Thesis, University of KwaZulu-Natal. Accessed August 06, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10413/14456.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mwaka, Erisa Sabakaki. “Stakeholder perspectives on informed consent and ethics review of research involving human specimen resource repositories (biobanks) in South Africa : a quantitative study.” 2017. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Mwaka ES. Stakeholder perspectives on informed consent and ethics review of research involving human specimen resource repositories (biobanks) in South Africa : a quantitative study. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of KwaZulu-Natal; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10413/14456.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Mwaka ES. Stakeholder perspectives on informed consent and ethics review of research involving human specimen resource repositories (biobanks) in South Africa : a quantitative study. [Thesis]. University of KwaZulu-Natal; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10413/14456

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Texas Tech University

2. Baxevanis, Susan E. Collection management and analysis of the Lake Theo Folsom bone assemblage.

Degree: 1997, Texas Tech University

The Lake Theo Collection is an important representation of a Paleoindian multi-component site on the Southern Plains. Its current state of degradation is not reversible; however, future deterioration has been slowed by the implementation of standard preservation and collection management techniques. The Collection Management Plan involves the inventory, cleaning, and stabihzation of the Collection, followed by adequate packaging, and storage by today's standards. StabiUzing and cataloging the Lake Theo Collection allows a re-investigation into this site without the need of additional excavations. The re-investigation potential of the site is demonstrated through a prehminary analysis of the bone material for species identification, morphological element, and evidence of taphonomic processes. The re-investigation of the Collection and the now useable Collection itself also lay the foundation for future research questions and excavation approach if the site were to be reopened. In the past, post-excavation care generally was not included in the archaeologist's budget or plan, and was a museum's responsibility alone. Many archaeological collections received by museums as unprocessed collections remained in that condition because museums could not afford the burden of the care that these collections pose (Bleed and Nickel, 1989). Even fewer could afford post-excavation research on the collections. The responsibihty the generator of a collection has to its in-perpetuity care has increased greatly, and recently-generated collections tend to be in much better condition upon arrival at a museum. However, older, unprocessed collections should not be ignored and allowed to deteriorate further and must be addressed in a museum's long-term goals. These collections contain information vital to the interpretation of archaeological sites that must be utilized before further destruction of a site is undertaken. The information the unprocessed collections contain can be useful in the planning and implementation of further excavations at the site from which the collection came.

Subjects/Keywords: Folsom culture; Natural history; Biological specimens; Bones; Archaeological surveying; Lake Theo

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Baxevanis, S. E. (1997). Collection management and analysis of the Lake Theo Folsom bone assemblage. (Thesis). Texas Tech University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2346/18134

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baxevanis, Susan E. “Collection management and analysis of the Lake Theo Folsom bone assemblage.” 1997. Thesis, Texas Tech University. Accessed August 06, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2346/18134.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baxevanis, Susan E. “Collection management and analysis of the Lake Theo Folsom bone assemblage.” 1997. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Baxevanis SE. Collection management and analysis of the Lake Theo Folsom bone assemblage. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 1997. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/18134.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Baxevanis SE. Collection management and analysis of the Lake Theo Folsom bone assemblage. [Thesis]. Texas Tech University; 1997. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2346/18134

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Cleland, Josiah David. ATR-FTIR chemometrics for biological samples.

Degree: MS, Nanoscience, 2018, Massey University

This project has used the analytical infrared reflectance technique of Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, for the prediction of chemical components in a range of biological samples. Data collection was carried out on 40 hyperaccumulator samples, 56 chicken feed samples, 54 lamb faecal samples and 188 forage feed samples. Predictions were made using several different regression methods including: Ridge, Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO), Elastic Net, Principal Components (PCR) and Partial Least Squares (PLS). The best methods were identified as LASSO, Elastic Net and PLS. Several spectral data pre-treatments were explored, the best of which combined Standard Normal Variant scaling (SNV) with a first-order Savitzky – Golay (SG) spectral derivative and smoothing filter. Several of the resulting models illustrated high quality predictions (R2 > 0.8, Relative Performance Deviation (RPD) ≥ 2). The SNV and SG pre-treatment almost completely reduces the contribution of strong water-based signals to the regression model, allowing the possibility of in situ prediction of forage feed composition with minimal sample preparation. ATR-FTIR spectrometers are available in a hand-held form, and the results of this research suggest that in situ forage quality analysis could be performed using mid – infrared (MIR) reflectance spectroscopy.

Subjects/Keywords: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; Infrared radiation; Chemometrics; Biological specimens; Testing; Research Subject Categories::TECHNOLOGY

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cleland, J. D. (2018). ATR-FTIR chemometrics for biological samples. (Masters Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/13346

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cleland, Josiah David. “ATR-FTIR chemometrics for biological samples.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Massey University. Accessed August 06, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/13346.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cleland, Josiah David. “ATR-FTIR chemometrics for biological samples.” 2018. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Cleland JD. ATR-FTIR chemometrics for biological samples. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Massey University; 2018. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/13346.

Council of Science Editors:

Cleland JD. ATR-FTIR chemometrics for biological samples. [Masters Thesis]. Massey University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/13346

.