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You searched for subject:(bicultural management). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Lincoln University

1. Frater, Jillian. Maori participation in fisheries management plans.

Degree: 1990, Lincoln University

If tino rangatiratanga as guaranteed under the Treaty of Waitangi is to be met, Maori participation is considered a desirable and I necessary component in the development of Fisheries Management Plans. The aim of this study is to propose a model which allows for Maori participation in fisheries management planning at a level equal to that guaranteed in the Treaty of Waitangi. The study uses Arnstein's ladder of participation (1969) as a "yardstick" for comparing the different levels of participation which may occur. Both the level of Maori participation provided for in the Treaty of Waitangi and in the institutional arrangements (at the constitutional, collective choice and operational levels) in the development of the Auckland and south-East Fisheries Management Plans are examined. It is concluded that Maori participation, as provided for in institutional arrangements of both Fisheries Management Plans, was at a level below that guaranteed in the Treaty of Waitangi. Furthermore, it is recognised that any system which would allow tino rangatiratanga to be expressed would need to incorporate the values and institutions of Maori. Consequently, a bicultural model for fisheries management planning is proposed, incorporating the values and institutions of both Maori and Pakeha.

Subjects/Keywords: Maori participation; fisheries management plan; Treaty of Waitangi; bicultural model; rangatiratanga; natural resource management; policy framework; 0502 Environmental Science and Management; 070403 Fisheries Management

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Frater, J. (1990). Maori participation in fisheries management plans. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/2381

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Frater, Jillian. “Maori participation in fisheries management plans.” 1990. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/2381.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Frater, Jillian. “Maori participation in fisheries management plans.” 1990. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Frater J. Maori participation in fisheries management plans. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1990. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/2381.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Frater J. Maori participation in fisheries management plans. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1990. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/2381

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Lincoln University

2. Talbot, John. South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management.

Degree: 1994, Lincoln University

A preliminary proposal for bi-cultural management of the eel resource of South Canterbury, intended as a basis for negotiation with Maori, is developed after review of relevant information available from within the Pakeha culture. The proposal takes into account only previously published Maori viewpoints. Frameworks for development of a bi-cultural partnership in resource management in New Zealand based on the Treaty of Waitangi are described. The importance of eels to Maori and to Pakeha is explored. Although most Pakeha have little interest in eels, there is a significant commercial fishery and associated eel export industry. By contrast, eels are of great significance to Maori, who particularly value them as food. Maori have expressed grave concern at the state of the eel fishery, and attribute its decline to commercial fishing, habitat destruction and pollution. The recently negotiated arrangements for fishing rights are described. Current, and preferred future, management arrangements for the eel fishery are outlined. The proposal for bi-cultural management of South Canterbury eels involves closing some areas to commercial fishing, developing the commercial fishery along lines negotiated at national level, shifting Crown management of the non-commercial eel fishery to the Department of Conservation, and promoting enhancement and restoration of eel habitat through a co-operative working party involving all stakeholders.

Subjects/Keywords: eels; eel fisheries; Canterbury; New Zealand; Maori; fishing; bicultural management; bicultural resource management; Treaty of Waitangi; Ngai Tahu Resource Management Strategy; Resource Management Act 1991; eel industry; 050205 Environmental Management; 050209 Natural Resource Management; 070403 Fisheries Management; 180203 Te Tiriti O Waitangi (The Treaty of Waitangi)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Talbot, J. (1994). South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4452

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Talbot, John. “South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management.” 1994. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4452.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Talbot, John. “South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management.” 1994. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Talbot J. South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1994. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4452.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Talbot J. South Canterbury’s eels : towards bicultural management. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1994. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4452

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Lincoln University

3. Oliver, E. F. Bicultural resource management in an Aotearoa New Zealand context : me aka whakamua.

Degree: 1994, Lincoln University

This dissertation is a synthesis of four years university study in the policy, planning and Maori resource issues area. I wrote this because many Pakeha still have no real understanding of Maori environmental values and management. I also wrote this to show "the way it is" with regard to Maori participation in resource management and decision-making. I was curious to know the reason why, even though recent legislation recognises Maori interests, their voices continue to be ignored in many important resource management areas. This dissertation discusses biculturalism and introduces the concept of bicultural resource management practice. Recommendations are made regarding what should be incorporated in to this type of practice. Their purpose is to guide those participating in resource management at the Government level right down to those working in resource agencies. This map of action came about from reflection on the institutions and legislative frameworks of this country. It was found that Aotearoa New Zealand's natural resources are managed within a monocultural framework. This dissertation has two main objectives. Firstly, to examine the common ground between Maori and Pakeha environmental values and management. The split people continue to make between Maori and Pakeha knowledge of the environment must stop. Fragmentation removes people from both the environment and the solutions to resource problems. If further research is completed regarding the common ground, a more holistic approach to resource management may be found. The second objective of this dissertation is to highlight the importance of institutional change. Without a commitment to institutional change, the policies recognising Maori interests will never be successfully implemented, nor will the essence of partnership guaranteed under the Treaty of Waitaki. In my view, if monocultural decision-making continues, so too will racial tension in this country. In many respects, this dissertation is intended for a Pakeha audience, but because I discuss common ground and bicultural resource management it will also be of interest to Maori. I feel a greater sense of identity with this piece of work by using personal pronouns. In my view, it is important not to separate oneself from one's research and because I discuss such concepts as common ground, I think it is entirely appropriate. Therefore, this dissertation is not written from the third person stance. Finally, I'll mention here that whakatauaki are found throughout the dissertation. This is because they contain valuable messages for all those participating in resource management.

Subjects/Keywords: resource management; natural resources; Maori; Treaty of Waitangi; Resource Management Act 1991; Maori Environmental Attitudes; biculturalism; bicultural resource management; Maori participation; 050205 Environmental Management; 050209 Natural Resource Management; 050208 Māori Environmental Knowledge; 180203 Te Tiriti O Waitangi (The Treaty of Waitangi)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Oliver, E. F. (1994). Bicultural resource management in an Aotearoa New Zealand context : me aka whakamua. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/2555

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Oliver, E F. “Bicultural resource management in an Aotearoa New Zealand context : me aka whakamua.” 1994. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/2555.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Oliver, E F. “Bicultural resource management in an Aotearoa New Zealand context : me aka whakamua.” 1994. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Oliver EF. Bicultural resource management in an Aotearoa New Zealand context : me aka whakamua. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1994. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/2555.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Oliver EF. Bicultural resource management in an Aotearoa New Zealand context : me aka whakamua. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1994. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/2555

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.