Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(baseball athlete). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Lemez, Srdjan. Mortality in Professional Athletes: Examining Incidence, Predictors and Causes of Death.

Degree: PhD, Kinesiology & Health Science, 2016, York University

Objective: The overarching purpose of this dissertation was to provide an evidence-based portrayal of i) incidence, ii) predictors and iii) causes of death in athletes from Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association and American Basketball Association, the National Football League and the National Hockey League. More specifically, this investigation highlighted i) mortality outcome differences of athletes between and within professional sport(s), ii) potential statistical artifacts that may be empowering biases of risk of certain lifespan predictors and iii) the challenges of contextualizing historical data to answer questions with relevance in the present where socio-contextual factors may be different. Methods: Data on player lifespan and biological and occupational variables were collected from publically available sources. A majority of the data were collected from wikipedia.org and sports-reference.com, which is a recognized sports archive of aggregated athlete records, and were cross-verified through rigorous web-based and sport encyclopedia archival searches. Several methodological approaches were used across seven studies, including descriptive and Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression survival analyses. Results: The key findings of this dissertation suggest that elite athletes generally have favourable lifespan outcomes, although numerous characteristics need to be taken into consideration, such as occupational (e.g., required energy system needed for participation) and biological (e.g., height) differences. As well, the leading causes of death in players from the four major sports in North America are similar to the leading causes of death in the age- and sex-matched controls from the Canadian and United States general population. Conclusions: Statistical limitations and biased reporting may skew public perception of the relationship between participation in high performance sport and lifespan. As such, there is inherent value in scientists critically examining the health outcomes of athletes and to make these data known to a broader audience, particularly as preconceived notions of health risks from sport participation vocalized through media often distort reality and can adversely affect sport participation rates. In summary, a comprehensive understanding of the implications of involvement in elite sport informs our broader understanding of general athlete health and helps to form evidence-based models of athlete development and care. Advisors/Committee Members: Baker, Joe (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Kinesiology; Athlete; Baseball; Basketball; Death; Elite; Football; Health; High performance; Hockey; Lifespan; Longevity; Mortality; Player; Sport

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lemez, S. (2016). Mortality in Professional Athletes: Examining Incidence, Predictors and Causes of Death. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32723

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lemez, Srdjan. “Mortality in Professional Athletes: Examining Incidence, Predictors and Causes of Death.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32723.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lemez, Srdjan. “Mortality in Professional Athletes: Examining Incidence, Predictors and Causes of Death.” 2016. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Lemez S. Mortality in Professional Athletes: Examining Incidence, Predictors and Causes of Death. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32723.

Council of Science Editors:

Lemez S. Mortality in Professional Athletes: Examining Incidence, Predictors and Causes of Death. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32723


Erasmus University Rotterdam

2. Broersen, Robin. Timing in the cerebellum during motor learning: from neuron to athlete to patient.

Degree: Department of Neuroscience, 2019, Erasmus University Rotterdam

textabstractThe cerebellum is involved in the encoding and integration of spatial and temporal information. Although these processes are crucial to our survival, the neuronal mechanisms the cerebellum utilizes to carry out this type of spatio-temporal processing, as well as the precise cerebellar contribution to temporal aspects of various behaviors, remain to be clarified. The research in this doctoral thesis describes findings from experiments done in rodents and humans, with a particular focus on cerebellar timing mechanisms. In rodents, neuronal circuit mechanisms underlying eyeblink conditioning are investigated. The contribution of pontocerebellar mossy fibers and perineuronal nets in the cerebellar nuclei to associative learning are examined. In humans, cerebellar involvement in action observation and spatio-temporal trajectory prediction are investigated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) patients, healthy controls and baseball athletes. Together, these studies demonstrate that the cerebellum is important for temporal processes during a range of behaviors, while revealing the neuronal circuit responsible.

Subjects/Keywords: cerebellum; cerebellar nuclei; perineuronal nets; whole-cell recording; eyeblink conditioning; mossy fibers; associative learning; timing; temporal; spatio-temporal prediction; spatiotemporal prediction; spinocerebellar ataxia type 6; SCA6; trajectory prediction; baseball athlete; action perception; action observation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Broersen, R. (2019). Timing in the cerebellum during motor learning: from neuron to athlete to patient. (Doctoral Dissertation). Erasmus University Rotterdam. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/118729

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Broersen, Robin. “Timing in the cerebellum during motor learning: from neuron to athlete to patient.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Erasmus University Rotterdam. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1765/118729.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Broersen, Robin. “Timing in the cerebellum during motor learning: from neuron to athlete to patient.” 2019. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Broersen R. Timing in the cerebellum during motor learning: from neuron to athlete to patient. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Erasmus University Rotterdam; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1765/118729.

Council of Science Editors:

Broersen R. Timing in the cerebellum during motor learning: from neuron to athlete to patient. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Erasmus University Rotterdam; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1765/118729

.