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You searched for subject:(banana republic). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Georgia

1. Shin, Sung. Application of brand concept maps to Gap Inc.

Degree: MS, Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors, 2011, University of Georgia

John, Loken, Kim and Monga (2006) offered a “brand concept map” (BCM), which identified important attributes associated with a brand, showing how these attributes are interconnected and conjured in consumers’ minds. Applying “ the Brand Concept Map” (BCM) method, the present study attempted to identify fashion brand association networks in Banana Republic, Gap, and Old Navy. Korchia's 15 attribute categories associated with fashion brand were used to classify fashion brand associations. This study provides a tool for assessing their company’s brand image for fashion marketing managers; that is, which brand associations are more or less important, which brand are associations directly or indirectly linked and how changes of brand associations can affect other associations. Advisors/Committee Members: Yoo-Kyoung Seock.

Subjects/Keywords: Brand Concept Map; Brand Image; Brand Association; Product Involvement; Brand Association Category; Gap; Banana Republic; Old Navy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shin, S. (2011). Application of brand concept maps to Gap Inc. (Masters Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/shin_sung-_201108_ms

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shin, Sung. “Application of brand concept maps to Gap Inc.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/shin_sung-_201108_ms.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shin, Sung. “Application of brand concept maps to Gap Inc.” 2011. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Shin S. Application of brand concept maps to Gap Inc. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Georgia; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/shin_sung-_201108_ms.

Council of Science Editors:

Shin S. Application of brand concept maps to Gap Inc. [Masters Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2011. Available from: http://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/shin_sung-_201108_ms


University of Southern California

2. Haspel, Savannah Renae. How Hollywood became the new American dream.

Degree: MA, Strategic Public Relations, 2011, University of Southern California

The American Dream is being Subjugated by The Nation’s Growing Celebrity Worship and Replaced by the Hollywood Dream. ❧ Almost everywhere one looks, celebrities now dominate the American culture. From television shows to household products, Hollywood has burrowed itself into nearly every aspect of people's lives. Many people not only want to emulate celebrities, but more and more want to actually become celebrities, too. This growing trend has impacted the attitudes and aspirations of the nation's youth, shifting from the once-revered hard-working American Dream to the ego-driven Hollywood Dream. This change did not happen overnight; it has been hundreds of years in the making, but has accelerated with a series of events in the last two decades. ❧ History shows that societal and cultural attitudes tend to shift over time. While humans all share the same basic biology needs, major occurrences like wars, economic conditions and technological advancements shape each generation's view of the world. This is now evident as many of the Baby Boomers (age forty-seven to sixty-five), who lived the American Dream, share a vastly different view of success than the majority of their children, the Millennials (age fifteen to thirty-one) do now. Many of the Millennials find it difficult to associate with their parents' aspirational views of America, where hard work brought prosperity, and have therefore sought a convenient shortcut: The Hollywood Dream. ❧ From the burgeoning middle class to the invention of movies to the Internet, much of society's ambitions have move from the family to the individual and the ego. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the different attitudes and motivational drivers for two of the nation's largest and most influential age groups: The Baby Boomers and the Millennials. Because of their enormous presence and buying power, and vast attitudinal differences, knowing how to craft messages and “speak” to these groups will be highly beneficial for public relations practitioners. ❧ This paper will compare celebrity fascination across generations and determine the underlining causes of how the Hollywood Dream replaced the American Dream. Additionally, it will identify key messages and tools that public relations professionals can use to effectively connect with this group. Advisors/Committee Members: Floto, Jennifer D. (Committee Chair), LeVeque, Matthew (Committee Member), Ross, Steven J. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: celebrity; worship; obsession; fascination; gen Y; millennials; hollywood; american dream; attitudes; beliefs; baby boomers; work ethic; expectations; entitlement; narcissism; psychology; fame; reality; television; family structure; parenting; childhood development; alternatives; history; stars; mental health; imaginary audience; emerging adults; theory; extended adolescence; escapism; mirror effect; schadenfreude; gossip; tabloids; paparazzi; entertainment; movies; society; generation me; sociology; consumer; luxury; lifestyle; aspirational; United States; America; shrinking; middle class; debt; technology; unhappiness; hopelessness; twitter; facebook; social media; new media; public relations; marketing; over consumption; banana republic; wealth; disparity; income; fans; fanatic; sycophantic; Internet; youtube; young adults; teens; tweens; tools; communication; strategies; tactics; workforce; workplace; differences

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haspel, S. R. (2011). How Hollywood became the new American dream. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/670578/rec/3242

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haspel, Savannah Renae. “How Hollywood became the new American dream.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed September 23, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/670578/rec/3242.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haspel, Savannah Renae. “How Hollywood became the new American dream.” 2011. Web. 23 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Haspel SR. How Hollywood became the new American dream. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 23]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/670578/rec/3242.

Council of Science Editors:

Haspel SR. How Hollywood became the new American dream. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2011. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/670578/rec/3242

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