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You searched for subject:(archaeological imaginary). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Beaudoin, Matthew A. De-Essentializing the Past: Deconstructing Colonial Categories in 19th-Century Ontario.

Degree: 2013, University of Western Ontario

This study engages with both the archaeology of colonialism and historical archaeology in a manner that brings them into direct dialogue with each other to explore how essentialized identity tropes are used to frame our conceptualizations of the past. The archaeology of colonialism and historical archaeology have been conceptually bifurcated along a colonized/colonizer dichotomy and continuously reified by the insertion of research into one category or the other. The archaeology of colonialism generally focuses on the experiences of the colonized within the colonial process, while historical archaeology focuses on the experiences of Europeans and/or people of European descent. This is not to say that archaeologists working on either side of this conceptual divide ignore each other entirely, but rather their foci – and subsequent discussions – rarely converge. To create a conceptual bridge between these disparate dialogues, I explore multigenerational, 19th-century sites in southwestern Ontario, all of which have two sequential occupations that serve to explore generational shifts through time. The sites explored are conventionally bifurcated along colonial and capitalist binaries, and categorized as colonized (Davisville settlement and Mohawk Village, two Mohawk communities) and colonizer (McKinney and Odlum families, two Euro-Canadian families), as well as elite (Mohawk Village and Odlum) and non-elite (Davisville and McKinney). An exploration of the patterns between generations, contexts, and the bifurcated divides enabled insights into the differences and similarities between and within the conventional tropes of colonialism. Furthermore, this allows for a discussion of how archaeological taxonomic conventions shape and conceptualize our interpretations from the outset and fundamentally limit the narratives that we produce. This exploration emphasizes that our contemporary archaeological discourses are products of present day sensibilities, firmly embedded within the legacies of colonialism, and create archaeological imaginaries of the past that insidiously reify the essentialized colonial divide. Instead of emphasizing the differences between Euro-Canadian and Indigenous sites, exploring the contemporaneous commonalities of existence for all the sites under study illustrates archaeological dialogues that transcend the colonial conceptual divide and de-essentialize archaeological narratives of the past.

Subjects/Keywords: archaeology of colonialism; historical archaeology; archaeology of capitalism; post-colonialism; 19th century; archaeological imaginary; Archaeological Anthropology

…206 Table 39: Registered Archaeological Sites in Brantford Township, Brant County, Ontario… …253 xii 1 Chapter 1 1 Setting the Stage Archaeological interpretation is premised on… …archaeology (Jones 1997; Liebmann 2012; Meskell 2002). Archaeological theories and methods… …boundaries of the archaeological discipline; however, the materialistic necessity of the discipline… …forces archaeological research to continue dividing people into categories based on their tools… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Beaudoin, M. A. (2013). De-Essentializing the Past: Deconstructing Colonial Categories in 19th-Century Ontario. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/1489

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Beaudoin, Matthew A. “De-Essentializing the Past: Deconstructing Colonial Categories in 19th-Century Ontario.” 2013. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed January 17, 2020. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/1489.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Beaudoin, Matthew A. “De-Essentializing the Past: Deconstructing Colonial Categories in 19th-Century Ontario.” 2013. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Beaudoin MA. De-Essentializing the Past: Deconstructing Colonial Categories in 19th-Century Ontario. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/1489.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Beaudoin MA. De-Essentializing the Past: Deconstructing Colonial Categories in 19th-Century Ontario. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2013. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/1489

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Southern California

2. Reynolds-Kaye, Jennifer L. Contemporary pre-Columbian art: recasting artifacts through object biographies.

Degree: PhD, Art History, 2016, University of Southern California

Unburied from layers of dirt, recovered from subterranean tombs, or stumbled upon during a traipse in the jungle, pre‐Columbian artifacts have sparked a curiosity in their discoverers since before the Spanish Conquest. Their strange appearance, masterful execution, and illegible hieroglyphs have confounded explorers and archaeologists avant la lettre. Though scholars have resolved many of the mysteries of pre‐Columbian objects, they continue to perform a representational duty that exceeds an intellectual interest. Beginning in the seventeenth century, but reaching an apex in the nineteenth century, certain Aztec images and objects were marshaled around a Mexican national identity with its epicenter in Mexico City, previously the Aztec capital city of Tenochtitlán. The Calendar Stone, Coatlicue Statue, and image of the eagle atop a prickly pear cactus were heralded as central iconic figures that could unite a fragmented Mexican population after Independence. Museums collected and consolidated the artifacts resulting both from government‐sponsored archaeological excavations and informal digs in peripheral communities. Though this Aztec‐centric national identity was intended to corral the citizens around a common set of mutually agreed upon images, the government practices continued to disenfranchise the outlaying communities most heavily impacted by the policies of colonization and coloniality. ❧ In the twentieth and twenty‐first centuries, Mexican artists have grappled with this representational legacy. This dissertation examines three contemporary artists who reinterpret pre‐Columbian visual culture to challenge the Aztec‐centric national identity promulgated in the nineteenth‐century. The three artists under consideration are Tatiana Parcero, Mariana Castillo Deball, and Demián Flores. I analyze a few key works by each artist through an object biography methodology that traces the pre‐Columbian object from its original manufacture to its acquisition in a U.S. or European institution to its most recent iteration in contemporary art. Through the object biography approach, I can more fully unpack the different circumstances of these objects’ existence, and their corresponding ontological and epistemological changes over time. I argue that these artists employ the materials and technologies of archaeological representation, including black‐and‐white photography, plaster casts, and oil painting, to critically examine the role of archaeology in underwriting an Aztec‐centric national identity. Structuring the dissertation is the theoretical framework of decoloniality, which insists on the continued repercussion of historical colonialism for source communities and pre‐Columbian objects. Advisors/Committee Members: Gomez-Barris, MacarenaGómez-Barris, Macarena (Committee Chair), Hudson, Suzanne P. (Committee Member), Holo, Selma (Committee Member), Martinez, Maria Elena (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: contemporary art; pre-Columbian art; Mariana Castillo Deball; Demiá; n Flores; Tatiana Parcero; Coatlicue statue; casts; archaeology; museum; institutional critique; Mexico; World'; s Fair; national identity; artifacts; archaeological imaginary; object biography; decolonial; visual culture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reynolds-Kaye, J. L. (2016). Contemporary pre-Columbian art: recasting artifacts through object biographies. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/439598/rec/1616

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reynolds-Kaye, Jennifer L. “Contemporary pre-Columbian art: recasting artifacts through object biographies.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/439598/rec/1616.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reynolds-Kaye, Jennifer L. “Contemporary pre-Columbian art: recasting artifacts through object biographies.” 2016. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Reynolds-Kaye JL. Contemporary pre-Columbian art: recasting artifacts through object biographies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/439598/rec/1616.

Council of Science Editors:

Reynolds-Kaye JL. Contemporary pre-Columbian art: recasting artifacts through object biographies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2016. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/439598/rec/1616

3. MacLeod, Suzanne. From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times.

Degree: School of Social Work, 2014, University of Victoria

As a social worker practising in long-term residential care for people living with dementia, I am alarmed by discourses in the media and health policy that construct persons living with dementia and their health care needs as a threatening “rising tide” or crisis. I am particularly concerned about the material effects such dominant discourses, and the values they uphold, might have on the collective provision of care and support for our elderly citizens in the present neoliberal economic and political context of health care. To better understand how dominant discourses about dementia work at this time when Canada’s population is aging and the number of persons living with dementia is anticipated to increase, I have rooted my thesis in poststructural methodology. My research method is a discourse analysis, which draws on Foucault’s archaeological and genealogical concepts, to examine two contemporary health policy documents related to dementia care – one national and one provincial. I also incorporate some poetic representation – or found poetry – to write up my findings. While deconstructing and disrupting taken for granted dominant crisis discourses on dementia in health policy, my research also makes space for alternative constructions to support discursive and health policy possibilities in solidarity with persons living with dementia so that they may thrive. Advisors/Committee Members: (advisor), Strega, Susan (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: social determinants of health; social exclusion; crisis discourse; Alzheimer's; Alzheimer Society of Canada; Suzanne MacLeod; Susan Strega; Donna Jeffery; poststructural; poststructuralism; admission to long-term care; funding for long-term care; Improving BC's care for persons with dementia in emergency departments and acute care hospitals Findings and Recommendations; acute care; aging demographic; BC Psychogeriatric Association; biomedical; British Columbia; Canada Health Act; collective social responsibility; competition; corporate profit; corporatization; deresponsibilization; elder friendly; elderly citizens; family caregivers; Foucault; found poetry; genealogy of power knowledge; incompetent; Ministry of Health; moral economics; pharmaceutical; bed blocker; stigmatized; tsunami; absent-person; action plan; aging population; alternative discourse; apocalyptic demography; appropriate; archaeology; archaeology of knowledge; archaeological; British Columbia; burden; Canada; caregiver; charity; charitable; collective; collective car; community; community care; condition of possibility; conditions of possibility; corporate; counter-discourse; dementia; dementia care; dementia policy; dementia social policy; dependent; depoliticize; discourse; discourse analysis; disruptive discourse; economic burden; economics; economy; elder; emergency; epidemic; exclusion; fear-monger; Foucauldian; found poem; genealogy; genealogical; health authority; health care; health care staff; health care system; health policy document; healthy lifestyle; home and community care; homogenization; homogenize; hospital; imaginaries; imaginary; incapable; individual responsibility; individualism; knowledge; long-term care; material effect; materiality of discourse; media; moral panic; national strategy; neoliberal; neoliberalism; neoliberal rationality; not prepared; object; objectification; other; person-centered; people living with dementia; person living with dementia; persons living with dementia; person with dementia; poem; poetic representation; poetry; policy; policies; political; politics; power; power knowledge; power relations; private; privatize; privatization; productivity of dominant discourse; public health care; residential care; resistance; responsibility; responsibilization; rising tide; Rising Tide The impact of Dementia on Canadian Society; safety net; shift costs to caregivers; responsibility; social policy imaginary; social well-being; social work; social worker; solidarity; specialized; stakeholder; state; stigma; subject matter expert; taxpayer; threat; unprepared; unproductive; voluntary; volunteer; wait time; wave; social policy

archaeological and genealogical methods. Thanks too for the fun, wide-ranging conversations and your… …research design. It defines poststructural methodology and Foucault’s archaeological and… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

MacLeod, S. (2014). From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5213

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

MacLeod, Suzanne. “From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5213.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

MacLeod, Suzanne. “From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times.” 2014. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

MacLeod S. From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5213.

Council of Science Editors:

MacLeod S. From the "rising tide" to solidarity: disrupting dominant crisis discourses in dementia social policy in neoliberal times. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5213

.