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You searched for subject:(antispasmodic). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Addis Ababa University

1. Tatek, Deneke. Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Stephania Abyssinica (Minspermaseae) Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine.

Degree: 2010, Addis Ababa University

Diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Diarrhea may result from disturbance in bowel function in which case there is increased bowel transit, excessive intestinal secretion of water and electrolytes, decreased intestinal reabsorptions as well as more frequent defecations of loose, watery stool. Many plant preparations have claimed activities and traditional used as antidiarrhea and antispasmodic. S. abyssinica is traditionally used for treatment of diarrhea and stomachache in Ethiopia. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antidiarrheal and antispasmodic activities of the aqueous and methanol extract of the root and leaf of S. abyssinica. Antidiarrheal activities were studied in mice using castor oil-induced diarrhea at doses of 25, 50,100, and 200 mg/kg body weight. The extracts significantly prolonged the time of diarrheal induction, increased diarrhea free time, reduced the frequency of diarrhea episodes, decreased the weight of stool, and decreased general diarrheal score in a dose dependent way. With dose of 200 mg/kg the extracts produced higher in-vivo antidiarrheal index (ADI) than the reference loperamide. ADI of loperamide, SALM, SALA, SARM and SARA was 77.33, 88.79, 89.21, 91.08 and 82.23, respectively. In Entropooling test in mice the extract significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited intestinal fluid accumulations of mice in a dose dependent fashion; with dose of 100 mg/kg from1.03±0.093 ml of the control to 0.403±0.019ml, 0.210±0.018 ml, 0.494±0.012ml and 0.288±0.026ml by SALM, SARM, SALA and SARA respectively. The antispasmodic activity studies were performed as in vitro and in vivo models. The in-vitro antispasmodic activity studies were performed on isolated GPI. The methanol and aqueous extracts of the leaf showed significant and concentration dependent inhibition of acetylcholine induced contraction of isolated GPI. The extracts depressed Emax of Ach, and decreased PD2 value of the Ach. The Emax of Ach at conc of 10-3M is decreased (from100 for the control group) by SALM with concentration of 200 and 100 ug/ml to 45.6±2.13 and 73.2±3.04 respectively, whereas by SALA with 200 and 100 ug/ml to 62.0±2.98 and 74.8±2.46 respectively. In the in vivo antispasmodic activity test, the extract significantly decreased the peristaltic index (PI). In normal transit test, the PI of SALM, SALA, SARM and SARA with dose of 200 mg/kg was all 0.00 (100% suppression of normal peristalsis). However in castor oil induced transit with dose of 200 mg/kg the peristaltic index (PI) of SALM, SALA, SARM and SARA was 26.67, 36.85, 22.00 and 40.65 respectively. The result of this study indicated that the plant extract possesses antidiarrheal and antispasmodic activities and proves the fact that this plant is used in traditional medicine for treatment of diarrhea, stomachache and abdominal cramp. Advisors/Committee Members: Ephrem Engidawork (PhD) (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: antidiarrheal; antispasmodic; antienteropooling

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tatek, D. (2010). Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Stephania Abyssinica (Minspermaseae) Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine. (Thesis). Addis Ababa University. Retrieved from http://etd.aau.edu.et/dspace/handle/123456789/5539

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tatek, Deneke. “Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Stephania Abyssinica (Minspermaseae) Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine. ” 2010. Thesis, Addis Ababa University. Accessed August 25, 2019. http://etd.aau.edu.et/dspace/handle/123456789/5539.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tatek, Deneke. “Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Stephania Abyssinica (Minspermaseae) Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine. ” 2010. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Tatek D. Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Stephania Abyssinica (Minspermaseae) Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine. [Internet] [Thesis]. Addis Ababa University; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: http://etd.aau.edu.et/dspace/handle/123456789/5539.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tatek D. Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Stephania Abyssinica (Minspermaseae) Used in Ethiopian Traditional Medicine. [Thesis]. Addis Ababa University; 2010. Available from: http://etd.aau.edu.et/dspace/handle/123456789/5539

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Addis Ababa University

2. Adugna, Chala. Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Essential Oil of Myrtus Communis L .

Degree: 2011, Addis Ababa University

The essential oil of Myrtus communis (EOMC) was evaluated for its antidiarrheal and antispasmodic potential against isolated guinea ileum (GPI), ex-vivo antispasmodic model; normal and castor oil-induced intestinal transit in mice; castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice and prostaglandin induce enteropooling in rats. Atropine was used in GPI and normal intestinal transit test as a positive control, whereas loperamide was used in the castor oil-induced intestinal transit and castor oil-induced antidiarrheal test. EOMC inhibited normal intestinal transit siginificantly (p<0.05) and the effect was comparable with that of atropine. All doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of the oil employed showed significant antidiarrheal and antienteropooling activities which was comparable with that of the positive control loperamide. Different concentrations of the essential oil were used in the presence of agonist (Acetylcholine) in GPI as contraction stimulator in ex-vivo. The oil exhibited significant reductions in Acetylcholine-induced contractions of GPI. The agonist-induced contractions of GPI were greatly reduced by both doses of 50 μg/ml (p<0.01) and 100 μg/ml (p<0.01), suggesting a powerful spasmolytic property of the oil. The effect produced showed that the oil is much more efficacious than atropine (6.66 x10-9 M) in ex-vivo model. The oil appears to be more efficacious in ex-vivo than in vivo which may be due to the difference in physiological conditions that exists between the two systems. This study suggested that the essential oil of M. communis possesses spasmolytic and antidiarrheal properties which are likely to be due to the α-pinene and linalool present in the oil. The spasmolytic and antidiarrheal mechanisms might be in part mediated via Ca+-channel blockage. The results obtained in this study also support the traditional use of the plant for stomach pains, and diarrhea. However, further study should be conducted in order to determine the exact mechanism (s) of action of the oil and also to characterize the constituents responsible for the activity observed. Advisors/Committee Members: Ephrem Engidawork (PhD) (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: essential oil; antidiarrheal; antispasmodic

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Adugna, C. (2011). Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Essential Oil of Myrtus Communis L . (Thesis). Addis Ababa University. Retrieved from http://etd.aau.edu.et/dspace/handle/123456789/5697

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Adugna, Chala. “Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Essential Oil of Myrtus Communis L .” 2011. Thesis, Addis Ababa University. Accessed August 25, 2019. http://etd.aau.edu.et/dspace/handle/123456789/5697.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Adugna, Chala. “Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Essential Oil of Myrtus Communis L .” 2011. Web. 25 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Adugna C. Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Essential Oil of Myrtus Communis L . [Internet] [Thesis]. Addis Ababa University; 2011. [cited 2019 Aug 25]. Available from: http://etd.aau.edu.et/dspace/handle/123456789/5697.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Adugna C. Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Essential Oil of Myrtus Communis L . [Thesis]. Addis Ababa University; 2011. Available from: http://etd.aau.edu.et/dspace/handle/123456789/5697

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.