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You searched for subject:(anti fat attitudes). Showing records 1 – 9 of 9 total matches.

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University of Hawaii – Manoa

1. Sauer, Wilhelmina Elizabeth. Implicit and explicit anti-fat attitudes and gestural mimicry.

Degree: 2015, University of Hawaii – Manoa

M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2014.

Gestural mimicry is a fundamental building block of interpersonal relationships. Attitudes have been shown to influence mimicry. The… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: anti-fat attitudes; explicit attitudes; implicit attitudes; mimicry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sauer, W. E. (2015). Implicit and explicit anti-fat attitudes and gestural mimicry. (Thesis). University of Hawaii – Manoa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101137

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sauer, Wilhelmina Elizabeth. “Implicit and explicit anti-fat attitudes and gestural mimicry.” 2015. Thesis, University of Hawaii – Manoa. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101137.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sauer, Wilhelmina Elizabeth. “Implicit and explicit anti-fat attitudes and gestural mimicry.” 2015. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Sauer WE. Implicit and explicit anti-fat attitudes and gestural mimicry. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Hawaii – Manoa; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101137.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sauer WE. Implicit and explicit anti-fat attitudes and gestural mimicry. [Thesis]. University of Hawaii – Manoa; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101137

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Bowling Green State University

2. Hauser, Jessica C. Understanding Explicit and Implicit Anti-fat Attitudes and their Relations to Other Prejudiced Attitudes, Controllability Beliefs and Social Desirability in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2010, Bowling Green State University

 Children as young as preschoolers have been found to hold anti-fat, pro-thin biases. These anti-fat attitudes persist through adolescence and into adulthood. Anti-fat attitudes can… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Developmental Psychology; Psychology; children's attitudes; adolescents' attitudes; young adults' attitudes; anti-fat attitudes; implicit attitudes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hauser, J. C. (2010). Understanding Explicit and Implicit Anti-fat Attitudes and their Relations to Other Prejudiced Attitudes, Controllability Beliefs and Social Desirability in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults. (Doctoral Dissertation). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1276650954

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hauser, Jessica C. “Understanding Explicit and Implicit Anti-fat Attitudes and their Relations to Other Prejudiced Attitudes, Controllability Beliefs and Social Desirability in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Bowling Green State University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1276650954.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hauser, Jessica C. “Understanding Explicit and Implicit Anti-fat Attitudes and their Relations to Other Prejudiced Attitudes, Controllability Beliefs and Social Desirability in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults.” 2010. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Hauser JC. Understanding Explicit and Implicit Anti-fat Attitudes and their Relations to Other Prejudiced Attitudes, Controllability Beliefs and Social Desirability in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2010. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1276650954.

Council of Science Editors:

Hauser JC. Understanding Explicit and Implicit Anti-fat Attitudes and their Relations to Other Prejudiced Attitudes, Controllability Beliefs and Social Desirability in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Bowling Green State University; 2010. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1276650954


East Carolina University

3. Baker, Jaclyn Kelly. Maternal Attitudes and Behaviors and Weight Concerns of Gymnasts.

Degree: 2017, East Carolina University

 Weight concerns are highly prevalent for adolescent female aesthetic sport athletes, particularly gymnasts, and these concerns can have detrimental effects on overall health and well-being.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Aesthetic sports; anti-fat attitudes; weight concerns; autonomy support

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APA (6th Edition):

Baker, J. K. (2017). Maternal Attitudes and Behaviors and Weight Concerns of Gymnasts. (Thesis). East Carolina University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10342/6350

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baker, Jaclyn Kelly. “Maternal Attitudes and Behaviors and Weight Concerns of Gymnasts.” 2017. Thesis, East Carolina University. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10342/6350.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baker, Jaclyn Kelly. “Maternal Attitudes and Behaviors and Weight Concerns of Gymnasts.” 2017. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Baker JK. Maternal Attitudes and Behaviors and Weight Concerns of Gymnasts. [Internet] [Thesis]. East Carolina University; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10342/6350.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Baker JK. Maternal Attitudes and Behaviors and Weight Concerns of Gymnasts. [Thesis]. East Carolina University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10342/6350

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

4. Boersma, Katelyn Elizabeth. WEIGHT-BASED DEROGATORY MEDIA: PREDICTORS OF MEDIA SELECTION, IMPACT OF EXPOSURE, AND THE MODERATING ROLE OF MALADAPTIVE APPEARANCE INVESTMENT.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, University of Windsor

 Building upon the work of Boersma and Jarry (2013), this research investigated the impact of experimental exposure to weight-based derogatory media on women’s body image… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: appearance schemas; body image; implicit anti-fat attitudes; maladaptive appearance investment; media; self-ideal discrepancies

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APA (6th Edition):

Boersma, K. E. (2017). WEIGHT-BASED DEROGATORY MEDIA: PREDICTORS OF MEDIA SELECTION, IMPACT OF EXPOSURE, AND THE MODERATING ROLE OF MALADAPTIVE APPEARANCE INVESTMENT. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Windsor. Retrieved from https://scholar.uwindsor.ca/etd/7238

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boersma, Katelyn Elizabeth. “WEIGHT-BASED DEROGATORY MEDIA: PREDICTORS OF MEDIA SELECTION, IMPACT OF EXPOSURE, AND THE MODERATING ROLE OF MALADAPTIVE APPEARANCE INVESTMENT.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Windsor. Accessed June 18, 2019. https://scholar.uwindsor.ca/etd/7238.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boersma, Katelyn Elizabeth. “WEIGHT-BASED DEROGATORY MEDIA: PREDICTORS OF MEDIA SELECTION, IMPACT OF EXPOSURE, AND THE MODERATING ROLE OF MALADAPTIVE APPEARANCE INVESTMENT.” 2017. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Boersma KE. WEIGHT-BASED DEROGATORY MEDIA: PREDICTORS OF MEDIA SELECTION, IMPACT OF EXPOSURE, AND THE MODERATING ROLE OF MALADAPTIVE APPEARANCE INVESTMENT. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Windsor; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: https://scholar.uwindsor.ca/etd/7238.

Council of Science Editors:

Boersma KE. WEIGHT-BASED DEROGATORY MEDIA: PREDICTORS OF MEDIA SELECTION, IMPACT OF EXPOSURE, AND THE MODERATING ROLE OF MALADAPTIVE APPEARANCE INVESTMENT. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Windsor; 2017. Available from: https://scholar.uwindsor.ca/etd/7238


University of South Florida

5. Schrider, Laurie. Anti-Fat Attitudes and Weight Bias Internalization: An Investigation of How BMI Impacts Perceptions, Opinions and Attitudes.

Degree: 2016, University of South Florida

 Americans hold negative and judgmental attitudes towards obese and overweight individuals and these anti-fat attitudes and weight stigma have become a damaging form of discrimination.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Obesity; anti-fat attitudes; stigma; weight bias; Kinesiology; Medicine and Health Sciences; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Schrider, L. (2016). Anti-Fat Attitudes and Weight Bias Internalization: An Investigation of How BMI Impacts Perceptions, Opinions and Attitudes. (Thesis). University of South Florida. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/6382

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schrider, Laurie. “Anti-Fat Attitudes and Weight Bias Internalization: An Investigation of How BMI Impacts Perceptions, Opinions and Attitudes.” 2016. Thesis, University of South Florida. Accessed June 18, 2019. https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/6382.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schrider, Laurie. “Anti-Fat Attitudes and Weight Bias Internalization: An Investigation of How BMI Impacts Perceptions, Opinions and Attitudes.” 2016. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Schrider L. Anti-Fat Attitudes and Weight Bias Internalization: An Investigation of How BMI Impacts Perceptions, Opinions and Attitudes. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/6382.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Schrider L. Anti-Fat Attitudes and Weight Bias Internalization: An Investigation of How BMI Impacts Perceptions, Opinions and Attitudes. [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2016. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/6382

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Florida

6. Locker, Taylor. Testing a Model of Counselor Bias in the Assessment of and Treatment for Overweight Clients.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2009, University of Florida

 Health professionals, such as physicians, nurses, and nutrition specialists, have endorsed having a preference to not care for obese patients, according to published reports (Puhl… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Body image; Medical personnel; Mental health; Mental health services; Obesity; Overweight; Psychological assessment; Psychological attitudes; Psychological counseling; Psychology; anti, attitudes, characteristics, client, fat, therapist

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Locker, T. (2009). Testing a Model of Counselor Bias in the Assessment of and Treatment for Overweight Clients. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025103

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Locker, Taylor. “Testing a Model of Counselor Bias in the Assessment of and Treatment for Overweight Clients.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025103.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Locker, Taylor. “Testing a Model of Counselor Bias in the Assessment of and Treatment for Overweight Clients.” 2009. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Locker T. Testing a Model of Counselor Bias in the Assessment of and Treatment for Overweight Clients. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2009. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025103.

Council of Science Editors:

Locker T. Testing a Model of Counselor Bias in the Assessment of and Treatment for Overweight Clients. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2009. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0025103


Loma Linda University

7. Stevens, Serena D. The Influence of Health Framing on Weight Stigma and Health Knowledge.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, Loma Linda University

  With increasing rates of obesity and obesity-related health problems, recent years have seen a great deal of effort exerted to improve physical health by… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical Psychology; Psychology; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Obesity - Prevention & Control; Obesity - Psychology; Obesity - Therapy; Risk Factors; Health Behavior; Weight Stigmatization; Anti-fat attitudes; Media effects; Health Knowledge

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stevens, S. D. (2017). The Influence of Health Framing on Weight Stigma and Health Knowledge. (Doctoral Dissertation). Loma Linda University. Retrieved from https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/473

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stevens, Serena D. “The Influence of Health Framing on Weight Stigma and Health Knowledge.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Loma Linda University. Accessed June 18, 2019. https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/473.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stevens, Serena D. “The Influence of Health Framing on Weight Stigma and Health Knowledge.” 2017. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Stevens SD. The Influence of Health Framing on Weight Stigma and Health Knowledge. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Loma Linda University; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/473.

Council of Science Editors:

Stevens SD. The Influence of Health Framing on Weight Stigma and Health Knowledge. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Loma Linda University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/473


University of Queensland

8. Alperin, Anandi. An empirical investigation of gender, sexual attitudes, weight bias and body image.

Degree: School of Psychology, 2016, University of Queensland

Subjects/Keywords: Body image; Drive for muscularity; Drive for thinness; Sexual dysfunction; Sexuality; Feminism; Attraction; Gender; Anti-fat attitudes; Obesity; 1701 Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alperin, A. (2016). An empirical investigation of gender, sexual attitudes, weight bias and body image. (Thesis). University of Queensland. Retrieved from http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:403081

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alperin, Anandi. “An empirical investigation of gender, sexual attitudes, weight bias and body image.” 2016. Thesis, University of Queensland. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:403081.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alperin, Anandi. “An empirical investigation of gender, sexual attitudes, weight bias and body image.” 2016. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Alperin A. An empirical investigation of gender, sexual attitudes, weight bias and body image. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:403081.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Alperin A. An empirical investigation of gender, sexual attitudes, weight bias and body image. [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2016. Available from: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:403081

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Hawaii – Manoa

9. Durso, Laura Elizabeth. The relationship of internalized weight bias to weight change in treatment-seeking overweight adults.

Degree: 2016, University of Hawaii – Manoa

Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2011.

Objective: The present study was designed to explore whether behavioral weight loss treatment is associated with changes in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Objective: The present study was designed to explore whether behavioral weight loss treatment is associated with changes in internalized weight bias among overweight and obese men and women. The relationship of internalized weight bias to treatment outcome was assessed; as well as its relationship to other psychological variables associated with weight change; including body image concern; self-esteem; anti-fat attitudes; depressive symptoms; anxiety and stress. Method: Participants were 106 overweight and obese men and women enrolled in a treatment outcome study using the Lifestyle Balance Program; a behavioral weight loss program emphasizing dietary change and increasing physical activity. Eligible participants were randomly assigned by treatment site to either a standard care condition following the Lifestyle Balance Program; or to a continuing care condition which included all elements of the Lifestyle Balance Program; plus 18 additional months of participant-led self-help. Participants completed measures of internalized weight bias; anti-fat attitudes; self-esteem; body image concern; depressive symptoms; anxiety and stress at the start of treatment; following completion of active treatment; and again at six-months post-treatment (i.e. follow-up). Results: Participants who completed treatment lost; on average; 5.22% of initial body weight at post-treatment with an additional loss of 0.50% of initial body weight from post-treatment to follow-up; with no significant differences between treatment conditions on measures of weight change and psychological functioning. Weight bias internalization was shown to significantly decrease over the course of treatment and again at follow-up and was associated with percent change in initial body weight from baseline to six-month follow-up. Participants reporting low levels of internalized weight bias at baseline lost twice as much weight when compared to participants reporting high levels of internalized weight bias at baseline. Though significant correlations were found between percent change in initial body weight and measures of internalized weight bias; body image concern and self-esteem; regression models failed to identify significant predictors of weight change among the study variables. Internalized weight bias was additionally shown to be related to body image concern; anti-fat attitudes; depression and self-esteem. Baseline scores of internalized weight bias contributed to the prediction of change in body image scores from baseline to follow-up and from post-treatment to follow-up. Discussion: Findings from the present study indicate a relationship between internalized weight bias and weight change in the context of behavioral weight loss treatment. Elements of behavioral weight loss treatment; such as cognitive restructuring; may contribute to the reduction of bias demonstrated in the present study. Study results also indicate the importance of assessing baseline levels of internalized weight bias; as having higher levels of internalized weight bias was associated with poorer weight loss outcomes. Limitations of the present study are discussed; including methodological issues such as the use of self-report questionnaires and the clinical significance of the findings. Future research may design interventions to specifically target internalized weight bias; through such methods as cognitive restructuring or cognitive defusion techniques; particularly among those individuals evidencing greater internalized weight bias.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Durso, L. E. (2016). The relationship of internalized weight bias to weight change in treatment-seeking overweight adults. (Thesis). University of Hawaii – Manoa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101479

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Durso, Laura Elizabeth. “The relationship of internalized weight bias to weight change in treatment-seeking overweight adults.” 2016. Thesis, University of Hawaii – Manoa. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101479.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Durso, Laura Elizabeth. “The relationship of internalized weight bias to weight change in treatment-seeking overweight adults.” 2016. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Durso LE. The relationship of internalized weight bias to weight change in treatment-seeking overweight adults. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Hawaii – Manoa; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101479.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Durso LE. The relationship of internalized weight bias to weight change in treatment-seeking overweight adults. [Thesis]. University of Hawaii – Manoa; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101479

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.