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You searched for subject:(analog authentication). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Cleveland State University

1. Gurary, Jonathan, Gurary. Improving the Security of Mobile Devices Through Multi-Dimensional and Analog Authentication.

Degree: Doctor of Engineering, Washkewicz College of Engineering, 2018, Cleveland State University

Mobile devices are ubiquitous in today's society, and the usage of these devices for secure tasks like corporate email, banking, and stock trading grows by the day. The first, and often only, defense against attackers who get physical access to the device is the lock screen: the authentication task required to gain access to the device. To date mobile devices have languished under insecure authentication scheme offerings like PINs, Pattern Unlock, and biometrics – or slow offerings like alphanumeric passwords. This work addresses the design and creation of five proof-of-concept authentication schemes that seek to increase the security of mobile authentication without compromising memorability or usability. These proof-of-concept schemes demonstrate the concept of Multi-Dimensional Authentication, a method of using data from unrelated dimensions of information, and the concept of Analog Authentication, a method utilizing continuous rather than discrete information. Security analysis will show that these schemes can be designed to exceed the security strength of alphanumeric passwords, resist shoulder-surfing in all but the worst-case scenarios, and offer significantly fewer hotspots than existing approaches. Usability analysis, including data collected from user studies in each of the five schemes, will show promising results for entry times, in some cases on-par with existing PIN or Pattern Unlock approaches, and comparable qualitative ratings with existing approaches. Memorability results will demonstrate that the psychological advantages utilized by these schemes can lead to real-world improvements in recall, in some instances leading to near-perfect recall after two weeks, significantly exceeding the recall rates of similarly secure alphanumeric passwords. Advisors/Committee Members: Zhao, Wenbing (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Computer Engineering; Computer Science; authentication; mobile authentication; graphical password; analog authentication; multi-dimensional authentication; shoulder-surfing; challenge-response; keystroke dynamics; virtual reality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gurary, Jonathan, G. (2018). Improving the Security of Mobile Devices Through Multi-Dimensional and Analog Authentication. (Doctoral Dissertation). Cleveland State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1521564381685222

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gurary, Jonathan, Gurary. “Improving the Security of Mobile Devices Through Multi-Dimensional and Analog Authentication.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Cleveland State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1521564381685222.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gurary, Jonathan, Gurary. “Improving the Security of Mobile Devices Through Multi-Dimensional and Analog Authentication.” 2018. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Gurary, Jonathan G. Improving the Security of Mobile Devices Through Multi-Dimensional and Analog Authentication. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Cleveland State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1521564381685222.

Council of Science Editors:

Gurary, Jonathan G. Improving the Security of Mobile Devices Through Multi-Dimensional and Analog Authentication. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Cleveland State University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1521564381685222


The Ohio State University

2. Casto, Matthew James. Multi-Attribute Design for Authentication and Reliability (MADAR).

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2018, The Ohio State University

Increased globalization of design, production, and independent distribution of integrated circuits (ICs) has provided adversarial and criminal opportunity for strategic, malicious, and monetary gain through counterfeiting, cloning, and tampering, producing a supply chain vulnerable to malicious or improper function and degraded reliability. Military, commercial avionics, medical, banking, and automotive systems rely on components providing high security, high reliability operation, and the impact can be large in terms of safety, readiness, mission success, and overall lifecycle cost when tampered parts find their way into the supply chain. Likewise, commodity platforms, such as the Internet of Things (IoT), rely on each networked component providing trustworthy authentication and identification, which has proven to be extremely vulnerable to cloning and spoofing when implemented through software or firmware solutions. Across these platforms, major effort has been focused on enhancing hardware assurance through intrinsic and unique physical hardware traits. Previous hardware authentication and identification techniques have targeted digital solutions that require increased logic overhead in order to obtain adequate uniqueness, have a limited number of implementation architectures, and suffer from significant environmental instabilities. In this work, the process-induced variation response of analog mixed-signal (AMS) circuits is investigated to yield foundational anti-counterfeiting, anti-cloning, design and characterization techniques. It explores unique behaviors termed Process Specific Functions (PSFs) to identify and group circuits of the same pedigree and provide traits for authentication, individual chip identification, and reliability monitoring. PSFs are demonstrated through the expansion of fundamental quantization sampling theory to produce a statistically bounded digital to analog converter model as implemented within a transmitter architecture. Simulation capabilities showed predictable circuit traits, including random process variations for authentication and unique ID. The model showed 90% Probability of Detection (PoD) with less than a 10% false alarm rate for an individual process specific cloning scenario, demonstrating foundational design capability for AMS counterfeit prevention and identification. The work makes significant progress towards quantifying design specific authentication behavior for the first time in analog ICs. A parameter space of harmonic amplitude responses is correlated to random and systematic process variations to produce challenge driven non-linear quantifiable and measurable distribution responses. These unique authenticity and reliability characteristics are related to physical process models in a low power 90nm CMOS, and are expanded for unique identification in a 130nm SiGe process technology. Collectively, this work provides an in-situ novel and foundational analog integrated circuit (IC) supply chain risk management (SCRM) and hardware security design framework. Advisors/Committee Members: Khalil, Waleed (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Electrical Engineering; Authentication; Unique ID; Hardware Security; Analog Mixed-Signal; Supply chain risk management; trusted electronics; digital to analog converter; Reliability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Casto, M. J. (2018). Multi-Attribute Design for Authentication and Reliability (MADAR). (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1512009861557857

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Casto, Matthew James. “Multi-Attribute Design for Authentication and Reliability (MADAR).” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1512009861557857.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Casto, Matthew James. “Multi-Attribute Design for Authentication and Reliability (MADAR).” 2018. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Casto MJ. Multi-Attribute Design for Authentication and Reliability (MADAR). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1512009861557857.

Council of Science Editors:

Casto MJ. Multi-Attribute Design for Authentication and Reliability (MADAR). [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1512009861557857


Iowa State University

3. Wang, Qianqian. Analog hardware security and hardware authentication.

Degree: 2018, Iowa State University

Hardware security and hardware authentication have become more and more important concerns in the manufacture of trusted integrated circuits. In this dissertation, a detailed study of hardware Trojans in analog circuits characterized by the presence of extra operating points or modes is presented. In a related study, a counterfeit countermeasure method based upon PUF authentication circuits is proposed for addressing the growing proliferation of counterfeit integrated circuits in the supply chain. Most concerns about hardware Trojans in semiconductor devices are based upon an implicit assumption that attackers will focus on embedding Trojans in digital hardware by making malicious modifications to the Boolean operation of a circuit. In stark contrast, hardware Trojans can be easily embedded in some of the most basic analog circuits. In this work, a particularly insidious class of analog hardware Trojans that require no architectural modifications, no area or power overhead, and prior to triggering, that leave no signatures in any power domains or delay paths is introduced. The Power/Architecture/Area/Signature Transparent (PAAST) characteristics help the Trojan “hide” and make them very difficult to detect with existing hardware Trojan detection methods. Cleverly hidden PAAST Trojans are nearly impossible to detect with the best simulation and verification tools, even if a full and accurate disclosure of the circuit schematic and layout is available. Aside from the work of the author of this dissertation and her classmates, the literature is void of discussions of PAAST analog hardware Trojans. In this work, examples of circuits showing the existence of PAAST analog hardware Trojans are given, the PAAST characteristics of these types of hardware Trojans are discussed, and heuristic detection methods that can help to detect these analog hardware Trojans are proposed. Another major and growing problem in the modern IC supply chain is the proliferation of counterfeit chips that are often characterized by different or inferior performance characteristics and reduced reliability when compared with authentic parts. A counterfeit countermeasure method is proposed that should lower the entry barrier for major suppliers of commercial off the shelf (COTS) parts to offer authenticated components to the military and other customers that have high component reliability requirements. The countermeasure is based upon a PUF authentication circuit that requires no area, pin, or power overhead, and causes no degradation of performance of existing and future COTS components.

Subjects/Keywords: analog Trojan; hardware authentication; hardware security; multiple equilibriums; Trojan detection; Computer Engineering; Electrical and Electronics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wang, Q. (2018). Analog hardware security and hardware authentication. (Thesis). Iowa State University. Retrieved from https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/17350

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Qianqian. “Analog hardware security and hardware authentication.” 2018. Thesis, Iowa State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/17350.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Qianqian. “Analog hardware security and hardware authentication.” 2018. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Wang Q. Analog hardware security and hardware authentication. [Internet] [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/17350.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wang Q. Analog hardware security and hardware authentication. [Thesis]. Iowa State University; 2018. Available from: https://lib.dr.iastate.edu/etd/17350

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.