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You searched for subject:(alcohol purchase task). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of South Florida

1. Adams, Lauren J. Can Cognitive Priming Influence the Reinforcing Efficacy of Alcohol within a Behavioral Economic Framework?.

Degree: 2014, University of South Florida

A considerable body of research supports the application of behavioral economic principles to study the relative reinforcing efficacy of drug and alcohol use. One self-report measure, the Alcohol Purchase Task, is thought to account for individual differences in the subjective valuation of alcohol consumption. To date, however, behavioral economic approaches have not evaluated the possible influence of memory-based expectations regarding the cognitive and behavioral effects of substance use on their measures. Alcohol expectancy research has found that more positive expectancies about the effects alcohol directly mediate drinking behavior and are associated with a number of alcohol-related outcomes. Given the importance of alcohol expectancies, the current study incorporated cognitive priming techniques into the Alcohol Purchase Task instruction set to test whether the activation of alcohol expectancy primes influenced patterns of alcohol consumption. Although previous research has primarily used the Alcohol Purchase Task in samples of heavy drinkers, we also examined differences between heavier and lighter drinkers to test whether expectancy primes would differentially influence alcohol demand. As expected, both heavier and lighter drinkers in the expectancy priming conditions purchased more alcohol overall relative to those in a non-primed condition. Results also suggest the positive-social expectancy content in the Alcohol Purchase Task increased the overall demand for alcohol relative to a modified Alcohol Purchase Task with no contextual primes, even after controlling for alcohol consumption. Although previous behavioral economic research has examined alcohol expectancies as a secondary outcome, the current study is the first to directly examine the influence of expectancies on alcohol demand using the Alcohol Purchase Task.

Subjects/Keywords: alcohol purchase task; drinking; expectancy; primes; Clinical Psychology; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Adams, L. J. (2014). Can Cognitive Priming Influence the Reinforcing Efficacy of Alcohol within a Behavioral Economic Framework?. (Thesis). University of South Florida. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4974

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Adams, Lauren J. “Can Cognitive Priming Influence the Reinforcing Efficacy of Alcohol within a Behavioral Economic Framework?.” 2014. Thesis, University of South Florida. Accessed June 16, 2019. https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4974.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Adams, Lauren J. “Can Cognitive Priming Influence the Reinforcing Efficacy of Alcohol within a Behavioral Economic Framework?.” 2014. Web. 16 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Adams LJ. Can Cognitive Priming Influence the Reinforcing Efficacy of Alcohol within a Behavioral Economic Framework?. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2014. [cited 2019 Jun 16]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4974.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Adams LJ. Can Cognitive Priming Influence the Reinforcing Efficacy of Alcohol within a Behavioral Economic Framework?. [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2014. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4974

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Kansas

2. Kaplan, Brent A. The Effects of Happy Hour Drink Specials in the Alcohol Purchase Task.

Degree: PhD, Applied Behavioral Science, 2016, University of Kansas

Operant behavioral economics is a discipline within behavioral psychology that integrates concepts and principles from microeconomic theory to examine animal (humans and non-humans alike) behavior. Research in behavioral economics – primarily demand curve analyses – has yielded valuable insights into the role of environmental effects on reinforcer consumption. Demand curve analyses examine how changes in a price of a good affect changes in consumption of that good. Due to practical and ethical concerns, preparations in demand curve analyses have shifted toward using hypothetical purchase tasks, where respondents report the quantity of a good they would be willing to purchase at various prices. There is strong evidence to suggest that happy hour drink specials are associated with undesirable outcomes such as increased amount of drinking, increased likelihood of being highly intoxicated (above the 80 mg/dl legal limit for driving under the influence), and increased likelihood of experiencing negative outcomes related to drinking (e.g., getting into fights). Public policy efforts have been made to ban or at least restrict alcohol drink specials. Drink special policies across the 50 states indicate wide variability, ranging from complete happy hour bans to no bans or restrictions. The purposes of the current experiments are to determine whether self-reported consumption of alcohol on an alcohol purchase task increases when participants imagine a hypothetical “happy hour” scenario and whether there are differences in change in consumption depending on whether participants reside in states with different happy hour restrictions (i.e., whether happy hours are banned). Results from the current experiments extend previous literature on alcohol purchase task vignette manipulations and provide some insight as to whether repealing happy hour bans in states where it is currently banned results in increased alcohol consumption. Advisors/Committee Members: Reed, Derek D (advisor), DiGennaro Reed, Florence D (cmtemember), Jarmolowicz, David P (cmtemember), Roma, Peter G (cmtemember), Johnson, Paul E (cmtemember).

Subjects/Keywords: Behavioral sciences; Behavioral psychology; Psychology; alcohol purchase task; behavioral economics; decision making; demand curve; framing; hypothetical purchase task

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kaplan, B. A. (2016). The Effects of Happy Hour Drink Specials in the Alcohol Purchase Task. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25355

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kaplan, Brent A. “The Effects of Happy Hour Drink Specials in the Alcohol Purchase Task.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed June 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25355.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kaplan, Brent A. “The Effects of Happy Hour Drink Specials in the Alcohol Purchase Task.” 2016. Web. 16 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Kaplan BA. The Effects of Happy Hour Drink Specials in the Alcohol Purchase Task. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25355.

Council of Science Editors:

Kaplan BA. The Effects of Happy Hour Drink Specials in the Alcohol Purchase Task. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/25355

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