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You searched for subject:(african american literature). Showing records 1 – 30 of 566 total matches.

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] … [19]

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1. Lee, Jeannette M. Gendered Nations: Black Subjectivity In Late Twentieth-Century African American and Black Caribbean Narratives.

Degree: PhD, English, 2009, Brown University

 As a black feminist project, this dissertation contends that late twentieth-century black diasporic literature intervenes in debates about shifts in black communal formation in the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee, J. M. (2009). Gendered Nations: Black Subjectivity In Late Twentieth-Century African American and Black Caribbean Narratives. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:170/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Jeannette M. “Gendered Nations: Black Subjectivity In Late Twentieth-Century African American and Black Caribbean Narratives.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:170/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Jeannette M. “Gendered Nations: Black Subjectivity In Late Twentieth-Century African American and Black Caribbean Narratives.” 2009. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Lee JM. Gendered Nations: Black Subjectivity In Late Twentieth-Century African American and Black Caribbean Narratives. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:170/.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee JM. Gendered Nations: Black Subjectivity In Late Twentieth-Century African American and Black Caribbean Narratives. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2009. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:170/


Wake Forest University

2. Humphrey, Alexandra. Dialogic Convergences of Spatiality, Racial Identity, and the American Cultural Imagination.

Degree: 2019, Wake Forest University

 This project seeks to analyze the various consequences of the relationship between racial identity and spatialization in American cultural production. I assert that this relationship… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Humphrey, A. (2019). Dialogic Convergences of Spatiality, Racial Identity, and the American Cultural Imagination. (Thesis). Wake Forest University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10339/93914

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Humphrey, Alexandra. “Dialogic Convergences of Spatiality, Racial Identity, and the American Cultural Imagination.” 2019. Thesis, Wake Forest University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10339/93914.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Humphrey, Alexandra. “Dialogic Convergences of Spatiality, Racial Identity, and the American Cultural Imagination.” 2019. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Humphrey A. Dialogic Convergences of Spatiality, Racial Identity, and the American Cultural Imagination. [Internet] [Thesis]. Wake Forest University; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10339/93914.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Humphrey A. Dialogic Convergences of Spatiality, Racial Identity, and the American Cultural Imagination. [Thesis]. Wake Forest University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10339/93914

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Liberty University

3. Trudeau, Brianne Nicole. Towards Understanding: The Study of Hughes' Poetry as the Epitome of the Expressive, Cultural, and Political Elements of African American Literature.

Degree: 2009, Liberty University

 Unfortunately, a disconnection currently exists between the academic world and the sweet, soulful study of African American literature (AA literature). Because there is limited exposure… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African; American; Literature; Literature, African; Literature, American; African American Studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Trudeau, B. N. (2009). Towards Understanding: The Study of Hughes' Poetry as the Epitome of the Expressive, Cultural, and Political Elements of African American Literature. (Masters Thesis). Liberty University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/masters/67

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Trudeau, Brianne Nicole. “Towards Understanding: The Study of Hughes' Poetry as the Epitome of the Expressive, Cultural, and Political Elements of African American Literature.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Liberty University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/masters/67.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Trudeau, Brianne Nicole. “Towards Understanding: The Study of Hughes' Poetry as the Epitome of the Expressive, Cultural, and Political Elements of African American Literature.” 2009. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Trudeau BN. Towards Understanding: The Study of Hughes' Poetry as the Epitome of the Expressive, Cultural, and Political Elements of African American Literature. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Liberty University; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/masters/67.

Council of Science Editors:

Trudeau BN. Towards Understanding: The Study of Hughes' Poetry as the Epitome of the Expressive, Cultural, and Political Elements of African American Literature. [Masters Thesis]. Liberty University; 2009. Available from: http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/masters/67

4. Keadle, Elizabeth Ann. Fragmented Identities| Explorations of the Unhomely in Slave and Neo-Slave Narratives.

Degree: 2016, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

  This dissertation explores the unhomely nature of the slave system as experienced by fugitive and captive slaves within slave and neo-slave narratives. The purpose… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American studies; American literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Keadle, E. A. (2016). Fragmented Identities| Explorations of the Unhomely in Slave and Neo-Slave Narratives. (Thesis). University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Retrieved from http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10163331

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keadle, Elizabeth Ann. “Fragmented Identities| Explorations of the Unhomely in Slave and Neo-Slave Narratives.” 2016. Thesis, University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10163331.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keadle, Elizabeth Ann. “Fragmented Identities| Explorations of the Unhomely in Slave and Neo-Slave Narratives.” 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Keadle EA. Fragmented Identities| Explorations of the Unhomely in Slave and Neo-Slave Narratives. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Louisiana at Lafayette; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10163331.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Keadle EA. Fragmented Identities| Explorations of the Unhomely in Slave and Neo-Slave Narratives. [Thesis]. University of Louisiana at Lafayette; 2016. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10163331

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of California – Riverside

5. Hollingsworth, Lauren Colleen. Reading the (In)visible Race: African-American Subject Representation and Formation in American Literature.

Degree: English, 2010, University of California – Riverside

 This project began with the intention to examine the connection between the aesthetic and the political in American literature's construction of African-American subjectivity, or the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Literature, American; African American Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hollingsworth, L. C. (2010). Reading the (In)visible Race: African-American Subject Representation and Formation in American Literature. (Thesis). University of California – Riverside. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5dh411p3

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hollingsworth, Lauren Colleen. “Reading the (In)visible Race: African-American Subject Representation and Formation in American Literature.” 2010. Thesis, University of California – Riverside. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5dh411p3.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hollingsworth, Lauren Colleen. “Reading the (In)visible Race: African-American Subject Representation and Formation in American Literature.” 2010. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hollingsworth LC. Reading the (In)visible Race: African-American Subject Representation and Formation in American Literature. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – Riverside; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5dh411p3.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hollingsworth LC. Reading the (In)visible Race: African-American Subject Representation and Formation in American Literature. [Thesis]. University of California – Riverside; 2010. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/5dh411p3

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of California – Berkeley

6. Henry, Alvin. Through the Second Looking Glass: Inventing the Minority Bildungsroman.

Degree: English, 2012, University of California – Berkeley

 My dissertation argues for the importance of what I term the minority Bildungsroman, a genre that twentieth-century writers adopted in order to represent racial anxiety… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American studies; American literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Henry, A. (2012). Through the Second Looking Glass: Inventing the Minority Bildungsroman. (Thesis). University of California – Berkeley. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/020614nk

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Henry, Alvin. “Through the Second Looking Glass: Inventing the Minority Bildungsroman.” 2012. Thesis, University of California – Berkeley. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/020614nk.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Henry, Alvin. “Through the Second Looking Glass: Inventing the Minority Bildungsroman.” 2012. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Henry A. Through the Second Looking Glass: Inventing the Minority Bildungsroman. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – Berkeley; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/020614nk.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Henry A. Through the Second Looking Glass: Inventing the Minority Bildungsroman. [Thesis]. University of California – Berkeley; 2012. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/020614nk

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Duke University

7. Bigsby, Shea William. Diasporic Reasoning: The Idea of Africa and the Production of Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century America .

Degree: 2012, Duke University

  This dissertation explores the significance of Africa (both as a literal geographic space and as an imagined or symbolic space) in 19th century American(more)

Subjects/Keywords: American literature; African studies; African American studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Bigsby, S. W. (2012). Diasporic Reasoning: The Idea of Africa and the Production of Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century America . (Thesis). Duke University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5438

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bigsby, Shea William. “Diasporic Reasoning: The Idea of Africa and the Production of Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century America .” 2012. Thesis, Duke University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5438.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bigsby, Shea William. “Diasporic Reasoning: The Idea of Africa and the Production of Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century America .” 2012. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bigsby SW. Diasporic Reasoning: The Idea of Africa and the Production of Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century America . [Internet] [Thesis]. Duke University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5438.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bigsby SW. Diasporic Reasoning: The Idea of Africa and the Production of Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century America . [Thesis]. Duke University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/5438

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Illinois – Chicago

8. Kroll, Erika Anne. The Double Bind of Black Manhood : The Language of Masculinity in African American Writings, 1800-1900.

Degree: 2017, University of Illinois – Chicago

 This dissertation describes the contested vision of African American masculinity in the work of 19th century abolitionists, African American activists, and Southern slaveholders. My project… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: masculinity; abolition; African American literature; American Literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Kroll, E. A. (2017). The Double Bind of Black Manhood : The Language of Masculinity in African American Writings, 1800-1900. (Thesis). University of Illinois – Chicago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21750

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kroll, Erika Anne. “The Double Bind of Black Manhood : The Language of Masculinity in African American Writings, 1800-1900.” 2017. Thesis, University of Illinois – Chicago. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21750.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kroll, Erika Anne. “The Double Bind of Black Manhood : The Language of Masculinity in African American Writings, 1800-1900.” 2017. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Kroll EA. The Double Bind of Black Manhood : The Language of Masculinity in African American Writings, 1800-1900. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21750.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kroll EA. The Double Bind of Black Manhood : The Language of Masculinity in African American Writings, 1800-1900. [Thesis]. University of Illinois – Chicago; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10027/21750

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Harvard University

9. Arimitsu, Michio. Black Notes on Asia| Composite Figurations of Asia in the African American Transcultural Imagination, 1923-2013.

Degree: 2014, Harvard University

  <i>Black Notes on Asia: Composite Figurations of Asia in the African American Transcultural Imagination, 1923-2013</i> sheds new light on the hitherto neglected engagements of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Literature, Comparative; African American Studies; Literature, American

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APA (6th Edition):

Arimitsu, M. (2014). Black Notes on Asia| Composite Figurations of Asia in the African American Transcultural Imagination, 1923-2013. (Thesis). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=3611509

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arimitsu, Michio. “Black Notes on Asia| Composite Figurations of Asia in the African American Transcultural Imagination, 1923-2013.” 2014. Thesis, Harvard University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=3611509.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arimitsu, Michio. “Black Notes on Asia| Composite Figurations of Asia in the African American Transcultural Imagination, 1923-2013.” 2014. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Arimitsu M. Black Notes on Asia| Composite Figurations of Asia in the African American Transcultural Imagination, 1923-2013. [Internet] [Thesis]. Harvard University; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=3611509.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Arimitsu M. Black Notes on Asia| Composite Figurations of Asia in the African American Transcultural Imagination, 1923-2013. [Thesis]. Harvard University; 2014. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=3611509

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


UCLA

10. Underwood, Brandy. Feeling the Crowd: Affective Responses to Collective Violence in African American Fiction.

Degree: English, 2017, UCLA

 “Feeling the Crowd” uses affect theory to analyze representations of middle-class responses to the modern black violent crowd in African American fiction. My project demonstrates… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: American literature; African American studies; African American Literature; African American novels; African American Studies; American Literature; English; Post-1945 Novels

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Underwood, B. (2017). Feeling the Crowd: Affective Responses to Collective Violence in African American Fiction. (Thesis). UCLA. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0gx4t0gz

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Underwood, Brandy. “Feeling the Crowd: Affective Responses to Collective Violence in African American Fiction.” 2017. Thesis, UCLA. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0gx4t0gz.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Underwood, Brandy. “Feeling the Crowd: Affective Responses to Collective Violence in African American Fiction.” 2017. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Underwood B. Feeling the Crowd: Affective Responses to Collective Violence in African American Fiction. [Internet] [Thesis]. UCLA; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0gx4t0gz.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Underwood B. Feeling the Crowd: Affective Responses to Collective Violence in African American Fiction. [Thesis]. UCLA; 2017. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0gx4t0gz

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Duke University

11. Wasserman, Casey. Disruption and DisFunktion: Locating a Funk Sensorium in Twentieth Century African American Literature .

Degree: 2011, Duke University

  This dissertation examines the way in which funk music, in the context of twentieth century African American literature, operates as a means of stimulating… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: American Literature; American Studies; African American Studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Wasserman, C. (2011). Disruption and DisFunktion: Locating a Funk Sensorium in Twentieth Century African American Literature . (Thesis). Duke University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10161/3925

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wasserman, Casey. “Disruption and DisFunktion: Locating a Funk Sensorium in Twentieth Century African American Literature .” 2011. Thesis, Duke University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10161/3925.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wasserman, Casey. “Disruption and DisFunktion: Locating a Funk Sensorium in Twentieth Century African American Literature .” 2011. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Wasserman C. Disruption and DisFunktion: Locating a Funk Sensorium in Twentieth Century African American Literature . [Internet] [Thesis]. Duke University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/3925.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wasserman C. Disruption and DisFunktion: Locating a Funk Sensorium in Twentieth Century African American Literature . [Thesis]. Duke University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/3925

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Southern California

12. Davis, Carol Bunch. Troubling the boundaries: "blacknesses" performance, and the African American freedom struggle of the 1960s.

Degree: PhD, English, 2009, University of Southern California

 In its analysis of four plays staged between 1959 and 1969, Troubling the Boundaries: 'Blacknesses' Performance and The African American Freedom Struggle asks how the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: American literature; African American studies; American studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Davis, C. B. (2009). Troubling the boundaries: "blacknesses" performance, and the African American freedom struggle of the 1960s. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/510952/rec/7607

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Davis, Carol Bunch. “Troubling the boundaries: "blacknesses" performance, and the African American freedom struggle of the 1960s.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/510952/rec/7607.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Davis, Carol Bunch. “Troubling the boundaries: "blacknesses" performance, and the African American freedom struggle of the 1960s.” 2009. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Davis CB. Troubling the boundaries: "blacknesses" performance, and the African American freedom struggle of the 1960s. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/510952/rec/7607.

Council of Science Editors:

Davis CB. Troubling the boundaries: "blacknesses" performance, and the African American freedom struggle of the 1960s. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2009. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll127/id/510952/rec/7607


Harvard University

13. Aubuchon, Jeffrey William. Sahara as Symbol in Later Twentieth-Century North African Literature: An Introductory Essay and Three Stories of the Desert.

Degree: 2017, Harvard University

The Sahara, with its harshness and apparent emptiness, is a place that even Ovid, in his Metamorphoses, harnessed symbol to describe. Images—or perhaps mirages—of seemingly… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Literature, African; Literature, General; Literature, American

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Aubuchon, J. W. (2017). Sahara as Symbol in Later Twentieth-Century North African Literature: An Introductory Essay and Three Stories of the Desert. (Thesis). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37736747

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Aubuchon, Jeffrey William. “Sahara as Symbol in Later Twentieth-Century North African Literature: An Introductory Essay and Three Stories of the Desert.” 2017. Thesis, Harvard University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37736747.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Aubuchon, Jeffrey William. “Sahara as Symbol in Later Twentieth-Century North African Literature: An Introductory Essay and Three Stories of the Desert.” 2017. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Aubuchon JW. Sahara as Symbol in Later Twentieth-Century North African Literature: An Introductory Essay and Three Stories of the Desert. [Internet] [Thesis]. Harvard University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37736747.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Aubuchon JW. Sahara as Symbol in Later Twentieth-Century North African Literature: An Introductory Essay and Three Stories of the Desert. [Thesis]. Harvard University; 2017. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:37736747

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia State University

14. Gibson, Ebony Z. Art for whose Sake?: Defining African American Literature.

Degree: MA, African-American Studies, 2012, Georgia State University

  This exploratory qualitative study describes the criteria that African American Literature professors use in defining what is African American Literature. Maulana Karenga’s black arts… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African-American literature; Black aesthetics

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APA (6th Edition):

Gibson, E. Z. (2012). Art for whose Sake?: Defining African American Literature. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/aas_theses/17

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gibson, Ebony Z. “Art for whose Sake?: Defining African American Literature.” 2012. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/aas_theses/17.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gibson, Ebony Z. “Art for whose Sake?: Defining African American Literature.” 2012. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Gibson EZ. Art for whose Sake?: Defining African American Literature. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/aas_theses/17.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gibson EZ. Art for whose Sake?: Defining African American Literature. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2012. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/aas_theses/17

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of California – Berkeley

15. Agbodike, Kanayo Jason. Race Across Borders: Transnationalism and Racial Identity in African-American Fiction, 1929-1945.

Degree: Comparative Literature, 2012, University of California – Berkeley

 Race Across Borders: Transnationalism and Racial Identity in African-American Fiction, 1929-1945, examines four African-American literary texts that employ transnational themes and aesthetics as a means… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Comparative literature; African American studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Agbodike, K. J. (2012). Race Across Borders: Transnationalism and Racial Identity in African-American Fiction, 1929-1945. (Thesis). University of California – Berkeley. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/16v2k9z2

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Agbodike, Kanayo Jason. “Race Across Borders: Transnationalism and Racial Identity in African-American Fiction, 1929-1945.” 2012. Thesis, University of California – Berkeley. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/16v2k9z2.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Agbodike, Kanayo Jason. “Race Across Borders: Transnationalism and Racial Identity in African-American Fiction, 1929-1945.” 2012. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Agbodike KJ. Race Across Borders: Transnationalism and Racial Identity in African-American Fiction, 1929-1945. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – Berkeley; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/16v2k9z2.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Agbodike KJ. Race Across Borders: Transnationalism and Racial Identity in African-American Fiction, 1929-1945. [Thesis]. University of California – Berkeley; 2012. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/16v2k9z2

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

16. Diran, Ingrid. Mutinous Muteness: Radicalizing Illegibility In Twentieth-Century African American Literature .

Degree: 2016, Cornell University

 Mutinous Muteness revisits W.E.B. Du Bois's idea of double-consciousness for its implications both as a theory of divided racialized experience and as a mostly unacknowledged… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American literature; critical theory

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APA (6th Edition):

Diran, I. (2016). Mutinous Muteness: Radicalizing Illegibility In Twentieth-Century African American Literature . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/43626

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Diran, Ingrid. “Mutinous Muteness: Radicalizing Illegibility In Twentieth-Century African American Literature .” 2016. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/43626.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Diran, Ingrid. “Mutinous Muteness: Radicalizing Illegibility In Twentieth-Century African American Literature .” 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Diran I. Mutinous Muteness: Radicalizing Illegibility In Twentieth-Century African American Literature . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/43626.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Diran I. Mutinous Muteness: Radicalizing Illegibility In Twentieth-Century African American Literature . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/43626

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

17. Morgan, Danielle. What'S So Funny?: Satire And African American Literature And Culture In The Twenty-First Century .

Degree: 2016, Cornell University

 This dissertation analyzes the use of satire in African American literature and culture in forming a new understanding of racialization in the 1980s through the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American literature; Satire

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APA (6th Edition):

Morgan, D. (2016). What'S So Funny?: Satire And African American Literature And Culture In The Twenty-First Century . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/44289

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Morgan, Danielle. “What'S So Funny?: Satire And African American Literature And Culture In The Twenty-First Century .” 2016. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/44289.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Morgan, Danielle. “What'S So Funny?: Satire And African American Literature And Culture In The Twenty-First Century .” 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Morgan D. What'S So Funny?: Satire And African American Literature And Culture In The Twenty-First Century . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/44289.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Morgan D. What'S So Funny?: Satire And African American Literature And Culture In The Twenty-First Century . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/44289

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Saskatchewan

18. Gerber, Lizette. Sensory Materialism and N. K. Jemisin's The Fifth Season.

Degree: 2019, University of Saskatchewan

 This paper reframes theories of vital materialism and connectivity through African American perspectives, establishing an approach of “sensory materialism” based on the African American call-and-response… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: new materialisms; African American literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Gerber, L. (2019). Sensory Materialism and N. K. Jemisin's The Fifth Season. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12245

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gerber, Lizette. “Sensory Materialism and N. K. Jemisin's The Fifth Season.” 2019. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12245.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gerber, Lizette. “Sensory Materialism and N. K. Jemisin's The Fifth Season.” 2019. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Gerber L. Sensory Materialism and N. K. Jemisin's The Fifth Season. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12245.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gerber L. Sensory Materialism and N. K. Jemisin's The Fifth Season. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/12245

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Princeton University

19. Bridges IV, William H. Playing in the Shadows: Fictions of Race and Blackness in Postwar Japanese Literature .

Degree: PhD, 2012, Princeton University

 This dissertation is the first book-length study to consider the literature, primarily prose narratives, engendered by postwar Japanese authors' encounters with African Americans and African(more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American; blackness; Japanese; literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Bridges IV, W. H. (2012). Playing in the Shadows: Fictions of Race and Blackness in Postwar Japanese Literature . (Doctoral Dissertation). Princeton University. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01qf85nb33g

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bridges IV, William H. “Playing in the Shadows: Fictions of Race and Blackness in Postwar Japanese Literature .” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Princeton University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01qf85nb33g.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bridges IV, William H. “Playing in the Shadows: Fictions of Race and Blackness in Postwar Japanese Literature .” 2012. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bridges IV WH. Playing in the Shadows: Fictions of Race and Blackness in Postwar Japanese Literature . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Princeton University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01qf85nb33g.

Council of Science Editors:

Bridges IV WH. Playing in the Shadows: Fictions of Race and Blackness in Postwar Japanese Literature . [Doctoral Dissertation]. Princeton University; 2012. Available from: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01qf85nb33g


University of Oregon

20. Curry, Elizabeth. Refiguring the Animal: Race, Posthumanism, and Modernism.

Degree: 2019, University of Oregon

 This dissertation explores the entanglements of racialized histories and experiences in America with conceptions of animals and animality and examines how African American and Native… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American literature; American literature; Animal studies; Modernism; Native American literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Curry, E. (2019). Refiguring the Animal: Race, Posthumanism, and Modernism. (Thesis). University of Oregon. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24546

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Curry, Elizabeth. “Refiguring the Animal: Race, Posthumanism, and Modernism.” 2019. Thesis, University of Oregon. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24546.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Curry, Elizabeth. “Refiguring the Animal: Race, Posthumanism, and Modernism.” 2019. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Curry E. Refiguring the Animal: Race, Posthumanism, and Modernism. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Oregon; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24546.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Curry E. Refiguring the Animal: Race, Posthumanism, and Modernism. [Thesis]. University of Oregon; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24546

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

21. Schindler, Melissa Elisabeth. black women writers and the spatial limits of the African diaspora.

Degree: 2016, State University of New York at Buffalo

  My dissertation contends that diaspora, perhaps the most visible spatial paradigm for theorizing black constructions of identity and self, is inherently limited by the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African studies; Comparative literature; African American studies; African literature; Black studies; American literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Schindler, M. E. (2016). black women writers and the spatial limits of the African diaspora. (Thesis). State University of New York at Buffalo. Retrieved from http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10163890

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schindler, Melissa Elisabeth. “black women writers and the spatial limits of the African diaspora.” 2016. Thesis, State University of New York at Buffalo. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10163890.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schindler, Melissa Elisabeth. “black women writers and the spatial limits of the African diaspora.” 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Schindler ME. black women writers and the spatial limits of the African diaspora. [Internet] [Thesis]. State University of New York at Buffalo; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10163890.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Schindler ME. black women writers and the spatial limits of the African diaspora. [Thesis]. State University of New York at Buffalo; 2016. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10163890

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Rochester

22. Mehra, Shaila. Recasting the past : history and the African American postmodern.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Rochester

 “Recasting the Past: History and the African American Postmodern” accounts for African American literature’s decisive turn to the past during the postmodern era. Focusing on… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: 1970s; African American literature; African American women's literature; Gender; History; Postmodernism

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APA (6th Edition):

Mehra, S. (2013). Recasting the past : history and the African American postmodern. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Rochester. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1802/27637

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mehra, Shaila. “Recasting the past : history and the African American postmodern.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Rochester. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1802/27637.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mehra, Shaila. “Recasting the past : history and the African American postmodern.” 2013. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mehra S. Recasting the past : history and the African American postmodern. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/27637.

Council of Science Editors:

Mehra S. Recasting the past : history and the African American postmodern. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/27637

23. Koleva, Daniela Marinova. "you Are Safe": Black Maternal Politics Of Resistance And The Question Of Community Consensus In African American Women's Literature.

Degree: PhD, English, 2012, University of North Dakota

  ABSTRACT The study focuses on a number of African American women's literary texts that employ the figure of the black mother and the motif… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: african american literature; american literature; hegemony; political literature; rhetoric; women's literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Koleva, D. M. (2012). "you Are Safe": Black Maternal Politics Of Resistance And The Question Of Community Consensus In African American Women's Literature. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of North Dakota. Retrieved from https://commons.und.edu/theses/1358

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koleva, Daniela Marinova. “"you Are Safe": Black Maternal Politics Of Resistance And The Question Of Community Consensus In African American Women's Literature.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Dakota. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://commons.und.edu/theses/1358.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koleva, Daniela Marinova. “"you Are Safe": Black Maternal Politics Of Resistance And The Question Of Community Consensus In African American Women's Literature.” 2012. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Koleva DM. "you Are Safe": Black Maternal Politics Of Resistance And The Question Of Community Consensus In African American Women's Literature. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of North Dakota; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1358.

Council of Science Editors:

Koleva DM. "you Are Safe": Black Maternal Politics Of Resistance And The Question Of Community Consensus In African American Women's Literature. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of North Dakota; 2012. Available from: https://commons.und.edu/theses/1358


Temple University

24. Johnston, Monique. "With Hope, Hunger Does Not Kill," A Cultural Literary Analysis of Buchi Emecheta.

Degree: PhD, 2012, Temple University

African American Studies

This dissertation interrogates Buchi Emecheta's motives in portraying Igbo culture through her novels. It attempts to situate the novels in reference to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American studies; African literature; African Literature; Buchi Emecheta; Igbo Culture

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APA (6th Edition):

Johnston, M. (2012). "With Hope, Hunger Does Not Kill," A Cultural Literary Analysis of Buchi Emecheta. (Doctoral Dissertation). Temple University. Retrieved from http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,166926

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnston, Monique. “"With Hope, Hunger Does Not Kill," A Cultural Literary Analysis of Buchi Emecheta.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Temple University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,166926.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnston, Monique. “"With Hope, Hunger Does Not Kill," A Cultural Literary Analysis of Buchi Emecheta.” 2012. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Johnston M. "With Hope, Hunger Does Not Kill," A Cultural Literary Analysis of Buchi Emecheta. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,166926.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnston M. "With Hope, Hunger Does Not Kill," A Cultural Literary Analysis of Buchi Emecheta. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Temple University; 2012. Available from: http://digital.library.temple.edu/u?/p245801coll10,166926


Florida Atlantic University

25. Tisdale, Ashely. Establishing the bondmother| Examining the categorization of maternal figures in Toni Morrison's Beloved and Paradise.

Degree: 2016, Florida Atlantic University

  Literary scholars have been examining and recreating the experiences of “bonded” female characters within Toni Morrison’s novels for decades. However, the distinct experiences of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American studies; Women's studies; American literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Tisdale, A. (2016). Establishing the bondmother| Examining the categorization of maternal figures in Toni Morrison's Beloved and Paradise. (Thesis). Florida Atlantic University. Retrieved from http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10300331

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tisdale, Ashely. “Establishing the bondmother| Examining the categorization of maternal figures in Toni Morrison's Beloved and Paradise.” 2016. Thesis, Florida Atlantic University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10300331.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tisdale, Ashely. “Establishing the bondmother| Examining the categorization of maternal figures in Toni Morrison's Beloved and Paradise.” 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tisdale A. Establishing the bondmother| Examining the categorization of maternal figures in Toni Morrison's Beloved and Paradise. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida Atlantic University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10300331.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tisdale A. Establishing the bondmother| Examining the categorization of maternal figures in Toni Morrison's Beloved and Paradise. [Thesis]. Florida Atlantic University; 2016. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10300331

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of California – Riverside

26. Hunt, Richard L. I'm (Not) Listening: Rhetoric and Political Rationalities of Self and Other.

Degree: English, 2016, University of California – Riverside

 In “I'm (Not) Listening: Rhetoric and Political Rationalities of Self and Other,” my primary aim is to explore and theorize the collective, social nature of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Rhetoric; African American studies; American literature

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APA (6th Edition):

Hunt, R. L. (2016). I'm (Not) Listening: Rhetoric and Political Rationalities of Self and Other. (Thesis). University of California – Riverside. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/46f6484f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hunt, Richard L. “I'm (Not) Listening: Rhetoric and Political Rationalities of Self and Other.” 2016. Thesis, University of California – Riverside. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/46f6484f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hunt, Richard L. “I'm (Not) Listening: Rhetoric and Political Rationalities of Self and Other.” 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hunt RL. I'm (Not) Listening: Rhetoric and Political Rationalities of Self and Other. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – Riverside; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/46f6484f.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hunt RL. I'm (Not) Listening: Rhetoric and Political Rationalities of Self and Other. [Thesis]. University of California – Riverside; 2016. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/46f6484f

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

27. Capelli, Amanda M. The (Un)Balanced Canon| Re-Visioning Feminist Conceptions of Madness and Transgression.

Degree: 2018, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

  By re-positioning the works of Elaine Showalter, Phyllis Chesler, Sandra Gilbert, and Susan Gubar alongside Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Nella Larsen, and Zora Neale Hurston, reading… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American studies; American literature; Gender studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Capelli, A. M. (2018). The (Un)Balanced Canon| Re-Visioning Feminist Conceptions of Madness and Transgression. (Thesis). University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Retrieved from http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10686919

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Capelli, Amanda M. “The (Un)Balanced Canon| Re-Visioning Feminist Conceptions of Madness and Transgression.” 2018. Thesis, University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10686919.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Capelli, Amanda M. “The (Un)Balanced Canon| Re-Visioning Feminist Conceptions of Madness and Transgression.” 2018. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Capelli AM. The (Un)Balanced Canon| Re-Visioning Feminist Conceptions of Madness and Transgression. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Louisiana at Lafayette; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10686919.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Capelli AM. The (Un)Balanced Canon| Re-Visioning Feminist Conceptions of Madness and Transgression. [Thesis]. University of Louisiana at Lafayette; 2018. Available from: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=10686919

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

28. Storm, Anna. Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Creation of "Authentic Voices" in the Black Women's Literary Tradition.

Degree: PhD, English, 2016, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

  This dissertation focuses on African American women’s literature from the 1890s through 1948, covering the New Negro movement and sentimental domestic novel, the folk… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: African American Studies; American Literature; Women's Studies

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APA (6th Edition):

Storm, A. (2016). Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Creation of "Authentic Voices" in the Black Women's Literary Tradition. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Retrieved from https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/1419

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Storm, Anna. “Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Creation of "Authentic Voices" in the Black Women's Literary Tradition.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/1419.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Storm, Anna. “Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Creation of "Authentic Voices" in the Black Women's Literary Tradition.” 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Storm A. Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Creation of "Authentic Voices" in the Black Women's Literary Tradition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/1419.

Council of Science Editors:

Storm A. Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Zora Neale Hurston, and the Creation of "Authentic Voices" in the Black Women's Literary Tradition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee; 2016. Available from: https://dc.uwm.edu/etd/1419

29. Edwards, Cheri Paris. Borders, space and liminality in Dorothy West's "The living is easy" and Rudolf Fisher's "The walls of Jericho".

Degree: English, 2014, Texas Woman's University

 In The Living Is Easy and The Walls of Jericho, novelists Dorothy West and Rudolf Fisher offer ethnographical treatments of 1930s Boston and Harlem. Along… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: American literature; African American studies; Social structure

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APA (6th Edition):

Edwards, C. P. (2014). Borders, space and liminality in Dorothy West's "The living is easy" and Rudolf Fisher's "The walls of Jericho". (Thesis). Texas Woman's University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11274/3639

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edwards, Cheri Paris. “Borders, space and liminality in Dorothy West's "The living is easy" and Rudolf Fisher's "The walls of Jericho".” 2014. Thesis, Texas Woman's University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/11274/3639.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edwards, Cheri Paris. “Borders, space and liminality in Dorothy West's "The living is easy" and Rudolf Fisher's "The walls of Jericho".” 2014. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Edwards CP. Borders, space and liminality in Dorothy West's "The living is easy" and Rudolf Fisher's "The walls of Jericho". [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Woman's University; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/3639.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Edwards CP. Borders, space and liminality in Dorothy West's "The living is easy" and Rudolf Fisher's "The walls of Jericho". [Thesis]. Texas Woman's University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/3639

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Rutgers University

30. Coley, Carrie Yava Tanneh, 1985-. Running out of time: radicalism, resistance, and the future of African American literature.

Degree: PhD, Literatures in English, 2015, Rutgers University

My dissertation is both a study of black radicalism and implicit bias in twentieth century African American literature, as well as a gesture towards new… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: American literature – African American authors; Radicalism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Coley, Carrie Yava Tanneh, 1. (2015). Running out of time: radicalism, resistance, and the future of African American literature. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rutgers University. Retrieved from https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/47343/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coley, Carrie Yava Tanneh, 1985-. “Running out of time: radicalism, resistance, and the future of African American literature.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Rutgers University. Accessed October 17, 2019. https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/47343/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coley, Carrie Yava Tanneh, 1985-. “Running out of time: radicalism, resistance, and the future of African American literature.” 2015. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Coley, Carrie Yava Tanneh 1. Running out of time: radicalism, resistance, and the future of African American literature. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/47343/.

Council of Science Editors:

Coley, Carrie Yava Tanneh 1. Running out of time: radicalism, resistance, and the future of African American literature. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rutgers University; 2015. Available from: https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/47343/

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