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You searched for subject:(active prosthesis). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Michigan

1. Lund, Jennifer L. Performance characteristics of active silicon microelectrode arrays.

Degree: PhD, Neurosciences, 1996, University of Michigan

Extracellular neural recording is an important technique for advancing understanding of brain tissue organization, for enhanced diagnosis and treatment of CNS-related disorders, and for the design of neural prosthetic devices. This thesis describes continued development of active, micromachined silicon thin-film electrode arrays for chronic multiple single-unit CNS recording and investigates the recording capabilities of such structures. These electrode arrays utilize a heavily doped (p++), 15μm-thick silicon substrate which supports 32 electrodes. They have been integrated with 3 μm CMOS circuitry for electronic recording site positioning (via a 32:8 switch matrix), amplification of the neural signals (in-band ac gain of 300, 100 Hz-7 kHz; dc gain <1), reduction of channel output impedances (<500 Ω), and multiplexing of the recordings from selected sites onto a single output lead. A number of challenges in the application of these active devices have been overcome, including the development of an encapsulation scheme which protects the integrated circuits from the micromachining etchants and from the extracellular fluid. Stress-compensated, 0.75 μm-thick LPCVD dielectrics provide protection above and below polysilicon electrode interconnects, while 1 μm of planarizing low temperature (420\sp∘C) oxide is used over aluminum interconnect in the circuit areas. Additional layers of PECVD nitride, metal and silicone can be added for enhanced chemical, electrical, and optical protection. The resulting process allows batch fabrication of the sensors with high yield and permits operation of both the transducers and circuitry in a challenging environment. A PC-based software interface for communication between the active probe and the user was developed which allowed the first successful neural recordings from any active electrode array. These recordings are comparable to recordings obtained via other methods in terms of signal-to-noise ratios (3:1 and better) and unit discriminability. This work also describes the investigation of a number of issues unique to active recording, such as optical noise sensitivity, input bias stability, baseline drift, referencing, and mixed analog-digital signal concerns associated with the sampling of low-level (100 μV) signals. Finally, the various circuit blocks required for active recording, their influence on recording ability, and design modifications for more successful active recording are addressed. Advisors/Committee Members: Wise, Kensall D. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Active; Arrays; Characteristics; Microelectrode; Micromachining; Neural Prosthesis; Performance; Silicon

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APA (6th Edition):

Lund, J. L. (1996). Performance characteristics of active silicon microelectrode arrays. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130054

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lund, Jennifer L. “Performance characteristics of active silicon microelectrode arrays.” 1996. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130054.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lund, Jennifer L. “Performance characteristics of active silicon microelectrode arrays.” 1996. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lund JL. Performance characteristics of active silicon microelectrode arrays. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1996. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130054.

Council of Science Editors:

Lund JL. Performance characteristics of active silicon microelectrode arrays. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 1996. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/130054


University of Lund

2. Krantz, Oskar. Social Construction of Technical Aids - Personal Meaning and Interactional Effects of Disability and Assistive Devices in Everyday Life.

Degree: 2009, University of Lund

This thesis concerns the role of disability and assistive devices in everyday life among persons with, for instance, impairments related to mobility (e.g. wheelchair users) and bodily shape and configuration (e.g. dysmelia). Assistive devices are seen as both includators (assisting participation and emancipation) and excludators (limiting participation, restraining empowerment, and stigmatizing). Perspectives include, for instance, stigmatisation, body-image, coping, empowerment, agency, motivation, needs, and everyday life. Use of assistive devices is discussed from the ValMO-model: Value and Meaning in Human Occupations. The discussion concerns the useworthiness, as opposed to usability, of assistive devices from a perspective of not only physics-based effectiveness (Newton), but also from a self-image and agency perspective based on habitus (Bourdieu). In study I, the experience of prescription of active rigid-frame ultra light-weight wheelchairs was reported, using data on 278 prescribers in Sweden. Prescribers emphasised self-image, design, appearance and aesthetics. Even though prescribers want to prescribe an optimal wheelchair, they may lack the possibility to do so due to: (1) lack of practice and specialized knowl-edge; and (2) narrow regulations, both pertaining to municipal political decisions. Study II describes the experience of active wheelchairs and societal provision thereof utilizing thematic qualitative content analysis of eleven interviews with experienced users in Sweden. Results showed users experiencing injustice and unfairness negoti-ating wheelchair needs in terms of physical and social functioning (agency); changes of attitudes/organization are suggested. Study III was grounded theory study that showed an adaptation of stigma-handling strategies to situations in everyday life by women aged 20 to 30 with dysmelia, i.e. upper limb reduction deficiency. Strategies were comprehensive patterns of action aimed at controlling information about one’s status as deviating from a contextual normality. A proofing or being attitude consti-tuted a contextual adaptation understood in terms of a concealing or revealing tactic, aiming at delaying or promoting exposure to contextual attitudes and possible prejudices. If exposure was delayed, a person with dysmelia blended in. Exposure could be voluntary or imposed. After exposure, the relative importance of TULRD in the specific context could decrease, thus a boost of an amplification or altering of the attitude, i.e. boost was the interactional outcome enforcing the choice of strategy in another context.

Subjects/Keywords: Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy; Nursing; Legislation; Hand prosthesis; Gender; Dysmelia; Disability; Congenital Limb Deficiency; Body-image; Active ultra lightweight rigid frame wheelchair; Assistive device; Needs; Upper Limb Reduction Deficiency; Self-image; Regulation; Prescription; Useworthiness

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Krantz, O. (2009). Social Construction of Technical Aids - Personal Meaning and Interactional Effects of Disability and Assistive Devices in Everyday Life. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Lund. Retrieved from https://lup.lub.lu.se/record/1296117 ; https://portal.research.lu.se/ws/files/4006316/1296118.pdf

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Krantz, Oskar. “Social Construction of Technical Aids - Personal Meaning and Interactional Effects of Disability and Assistive Devices in Everyday Life.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Lund. Accessed January 26, 2021. https://lup.lub.lu.se/record/1296117 ; https://portal.research.lu.se/ws/files/4006316/1296118.pdf.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Krantz, Oskar. “Social Construction of Technical Aids - Personal Meaning and Interactional Effects of Disability and Assistive Devices in Everyday Life.” 2009. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Krantz O. Social Construction of Technical Aids - Personal Meaning and Interactional Effects of Disability and Assistive Devices in Everyday Life. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Lund; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: https://lup.lub.lu.se/record/1296117 ; https://portal.research.lu.se/ws/files/4006316/1296118.pdf.

Council of Science Editors:

Krantz O. Social Construction of Technical Aids - Personal Meaning and Interactional Effects of Disability and Assistive Devices in Everyday Life. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Lund; 2009. Available from: https://lup.lub.lu.se/record/1296117 ; https://portal.research.lu.se/ws/files/4006316/1296118.pdf

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