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You searched for subject:(Yawuru). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Yap, Mandy. In pursuit of culturally relevant indicators of Indigenous wellbeing .

Degree: 2017, Australian National University

Wellbeing as a measure for evidence-based policy has gained prominence internationally and nationally. There is now widespread recognition that wellbeing is multidimensional and contextually and culturally constructed. Despite this, the tendency has been to establish universal criteria and indicators for the measurement of wellbeing. One problem with such universal applications is that the different meanings and understandings of what constitutes wellbeing that are held by different peoples can be overlooked. This is particularly true for Indigenous peoples around the world where parameters of their wellbeing tend to be defined on their behalf. While this in part reflects the power imbalance between Indigenous peoples and nation-states, it is also simply the lack of adequately nuanced data on what constitutes ‘wellbeing’ for Indigenous peoples. This situation can be attributed to the difficulty of creating measures that can be both ‘relevant’ and ‘usable’. ‘Relevance’ involves giving priority to Indigenous worldviews concerning wellbeing while concerns for ‘usability’ can steer researchers and policy makers toward a reliance on existing normative datasets and methodologies. As a result, a disconnection persists between Indigenous peoples’ aspirations for wellbeing and the policies and reporting frameworks aimed at improving Indigenous wellbeing. This disconnect can be usefully framed in the ‘recognition space’. Operationalising this space requires a focus on how wellbeing is conceptualised, by what process are wellbeing measures decided, for what purposes, and who makes those decisions. This thesis has the ambitious aim of operationalising the recognition space, to conduct research that addresses the challenge of bringing closer the often opposing concerns for ‘relevance’ and ‘usability’ in the development of wellbeing measures. A substantial component of the thesis is therefore focused on process, not just outcomes. The operationalising of the recognition space involved a two-fold process Firstly, existing approaches are extended by incorporating Indigenous worldviews in the framing of wellbeing evaluation. As an approach, it is a step in the direction of making visible the aspects of Indigenous wellbeing which tend to be at the margins of ‘usability’ accounts. But ultimately, such an approach remains imperfect. Conceptualising Indigenous wellbeing that is both ‘relevant’ and ‘usable’ requires an alternative approach. In the second part of the thesis, an alternative approach starting from Indigenous perspectives is explored, working with the Yawuru community in Broome, Western Australia. The Yawuru case study employed a participatory mixed-methods approach whereby narratives and expressions…

Subjects/Keywords: Indigenous wellbeing; indicators; wellbeing; methodology and methods; capabilities approach; Best-Worst Scaling; mixed-methods; composite index; recognition space; Yawuru

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yap, M. (2017). In pursuit of culturally relevant indicators of Indigenous wellbeing . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/132620

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yap, Mandy. “In pursuit of culturally relevant indicators of Indigenous wellbeing .” 2017. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/132620.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yap, Mandy. “In pursuit of culturally relevant indicators of Indigenous wellbeing .” 2017. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Yap M. In pursuit of culturally relevant indicators of Indigenous wellbeing . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/132620.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Yap M. In pursuit of culturally relevant indicators of Indigenous wellbeing . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/132620

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of New South Wales

2. Tighe, Joseph. For mabu liyan (healthy spirit): The development and trial of the iBobbly suicide prevention app for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth.

Degree: Psychiatry, 2019, University of New South Wales

The colonisation of Australia has led to persistent inequity and disadvantage for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (herein referred to as Indigenous Australians) and has had a devastating impact on their health and wellbeing. Multiple barriers to appropriate care continue to contribute to significant disparities in health outcomes for Indigenous Australians compared to other Australians. Suicide among Indigenous Australians was a rare phenomenon until the 1980s, however some communities now record rates among the highest in the world, particularly among young people. Despite the need, there is a dearth of evidence around what is effective in Indigenous youth suicide prevention. This thesis was driven by community need and the courage of Yawuru community members to innovate with haste in a painful, grief-laden and political space. Trusted working relationships between stakeholders were imperative to conduct the work described herein. This thesis includes eight papers over four chapters. Chapter 2 provides context around remote Indigenous suicide and reviews the limited Indigenous suicide prevention evidence. Chapter 3 highlights the promise of technology and describes the protocol for a randomised controlled trial of "IBobbly"; an app featuring acceptance-based therapeutic activities. Chapter 4 employs mixed-methods to present the results of the trial including an analysis of app usage and acceptability. Finally, Chapter 5 systematically reviews the efficacy of acceptance and commitment therapy for suicidal ideation and self-harm. This chapter also focuses on knowledge translation, particularly dissemination of results through online video. The trial indicated that the app reduced depression and psychological distress but neither suicidal ideation nor impulsivity. Community members regarded the app as acceptable, culturally appropriate and of therapeutic value. The three per cent attrition rate was a stand-out aspect of the trial. Finally, the use of accessible mediums such as community reports and online video aided the understanding and promotion of research in Indigenous communities.To conclude, a co-designed app in the challenging space of youth suicide can be adopted and acceptable to Indigenous communities and can improve emotional wellbeing. This thesis demonstrates that studies built on trusted relationships can potentially maintain participant engagement and enhance the likelihood of meaningful future collaborations. Advisors/Committee Members: Christensen, Helen, Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW, Shand, Fiona, Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW.

Subjects/Keywords: ATSI; Aboriginal; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; Indigenous; Yawuru; app; ehealth; mhealth; Online; Internet; Mental health; Therapy; Psychology; Cognitive behavioral therapy; Indigenous Australian; Depression; Distress; Impulsivity; Suicide ideation; Social and emotional wellbeing; suicide; suicide prevention; Acceptance and commitment therapy; ACT; CBT; Kimberley

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tighe, J. (2019). For mabu liyan (healthy spirit): The development and trial of the iBobbly suicide prevention app for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/64929 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:63049/SOURCE02?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tighe, Joseph. “For mabu liyan (healthy spirit): The development and trial of the iBobbly suicide prevention app for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/64929 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:63049/SOURCE02?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tighe, Joseph. “For mabu liyan (healthy spirit): The development and trial of the iBobbly suicide prevention app for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth.” 2019. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Tighe J. For mabu liyan (healthy spirit): The development and trial of the iBobbly suicide prevention app for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2019. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/64929 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:63049/SOURCE02?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Tighe J. For mabu liyan (healthy spirit): The development and trial of the iBobbly suicide prevention app for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2019. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/64929 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:63049/SOURCE02?view=true

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