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You searched for subject:(Yagua). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Oregon

1. Pena, Jaime G. A Historical Reconstruction of the Peba-Yaguan Linguistic Family.

Degree: 2009, University of Oregon

In this thesis, a reconstruction of Proto-Peba-Yagua is attempted using the comparative method. Peba-Yagua had three members in the past: Yagua, Peba and Yameo. Yagua is the only extant member of the family. Information about the sound inventory and the morphology of the proto-system is provided and discussed based on comparisons of all three varieties. Results show that Proto- Peba-Yagua had at least the consonants *p, *t, *k, *m, *n, *tJ, *R, *h, *w, *j and at least the vowels *a, *e, *i, *u. Peba and Yameo show more similarity with regards to the historical development of their sound inventory. With regards to morphology and grammar, because of lack of evidence for all involved linguistic varieties, the only categories that can be reconstructed are parts of the pronominal system, some classifiers and the locative morpheme *-mV.

Subjects/Keywords: Proto-Peba-Yagua language

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pena, J. G. (2009). A Historical Reconstruction of the Peba-Yaguan Linguistic Family. (Thesis). University of Oregon. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1794/10023

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pena, Jaime G. “A Historical Reconstruction of the Peba-Yaguan Linguistic Family.” 2009. Thesis, University of Oregon. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1794/10023.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pena, Jaime G. “A Historical Reconstruction of the Peba-Yaguan Linguistic Family.” 2009. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Pena JG. A Historical Reconstruction of the Peba-Yaguan Linguistic Family. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Oregon; 2009. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/10023.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pena JG. A Historical Reconstruction of the Peba-Yaguan Linguistic Family. [Thesis]. University of Oregon; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/10023

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Florida International University

2. Labriola, Christine. Environment, Culture, and Medicinal Plant Knowledge in an Indigenous Amazonian Community.

Degree: 2009, Florida International University

Diminishing cultural and biological diversity is a current global crisis. Tropical forests and indigenous peoples are adversely affected by social and environmental changes caused by global political and economic systems. The purpose of this thesis was to investigate environmental and livelihood challenges as well as medicinal plant knowledge in a Yagua village in the Peruvian Amazon. Indigenous peoples’ relationships with the environment is an important topic in environmental anthropology, and traditional botanical knowledge is an integral component of ethnobotany. Political ecology provides a useful theoretical perspective for understanding the economic and political dimensions of environmental and social conditions. This research utilized a variety of ethnographic, ethnobotanical, and community-involved methods. Findings include data and analyses about the community’s culture, subsistence and natural resource needs, organizations and institutions, and medicinal plant use. The conclusion discusses the case study in terms of the disciplinary framework and offers suggestions for research and application. Advisors/Committee Members: Dennis Wiedman, Laura Ogden, William Vickers.

Subjects/Keywords: environment; Amazon; indigenous; Yagua; medicinal plants; ethnobotany; community; knowledge; culture; anthropology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Labriola, C. (2009). Environment, Culture, and Medicinal Plant Knowledge in an Indigenous Amazonian Community. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/143 ; FI09121606

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Labriola, Christine. “Environment, Culture, and Medicinal Plant Knowledge in an Indigenous Amazonian Community.” 2009. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/143 ; FI09121606.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Labriola, Christine. “Environment, Culture, and Medicinal Plant Knowledge in an Indigenous Amazonian Community.” 2009. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Labriola C. Environment, Culture, and Medicinal Plant Knowledge in an Indigenous Amazonian Community. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2009. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/143 ; FI09121606.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Labriola C. Environment, Culture, and Medicinal Plant Knowledge in an Indigenous Amazonian Community. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2009. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/143 ; FI09121606

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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