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You searched for subject:(Wind surfing). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Florida

1. Bonsmann, Jarrod. Finite Element Analysis for Use in Fluid Structure Interaction of a High Aspect Ratio Thin Airfoil using Drop-Plies.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2010, University of Florida

Abstract of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS FOR USE IN FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION OF A HIGH ASPECT RATIO THIN AIRFOIL USING DROP-PLIES By Jarrod M Bonsmann May 2010 Chair: Peter Ifju Cochair: Bhavani Sankar Major: Mechanical Engineering One of the primary advantages in using fiber composite materials for mechanical applications is the ability of the user to tailor the mechanical properties of the material to its specific application. One such example is the use of graphite fiber woven cloth embedded in epoxy for the fabrication of high aspect ratio thin airfoils. These airfoils can be used in a number of fields from rotor blade technology to recreational and sporting equipment such as a racing windsurfing fin. This thesis uses a windsurfing fin for design verification. By using graphite/epoxy material one is able to vary the ply lay-up to produce different stiffness properties in the fin as well as different bend twist coupling characteristics in the airfoil. Mechanical tests using electrical resistance strain gages are performed to obtain the various material properties of the graphite/epoxy system used. ABAQUS finite element analysis (FEA) program and MatLab technical computing software are used to create a finite element model for use in analyzing the deformation characteristics of the fin in various loading conditions. The model deformations are verified using Visual Image Correlation (VIC) to study the deflections of a fin with known material lay-up properties and loading conditions. Once all of these tests and studies are performed Athena Vortex Lattice (AVL) program is used to obtain the fluid structure interaction pressure loads on a fin in water. With these loads and the computer model, a tool is developed that can be used to study and optimize the design of the windsurfing fin without the costly (both time and monetary) creation of a plethora of fins utilizing almost endless possibilities of ply lay-up directions and lengths. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Ifju, Peter (committee chair), Kumar, Ashok V. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Aluminum; Bending; Composite materials; Eggshells; Material properties; Modeling; Specimens; Strain gauges; Structural deflection; Wind surfing; avl, fea, vic

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bonsmann, J. (2010). Finite Element Analysis for Use in Fluid Structure Interaction of a High Aspect Ratio Thin Airfoil using Drop-Plies. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041819

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bonsmann, Jarrod. “Finite Element Analysis for Use in Fluid Structure Interaction of a High Aspect Ratio Thin Airfoil using Drop-Plies.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041819.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bonsmann, Jarrod. “Finite Element Analysis for Use in Fluid Structure Interaction of a High Aspect Ratio Thin Airfoil using Drop-Plies.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bonsmann J. Finite Element Analysis for Use in Fluid Structure Interaction of a High Aspect Ratio Thin Airfoil using Drop-Plies. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041819.

Council of Science Editors:

Bonsmann J. Finite Element Analysis for Use in Fluid Structure Interaction of a High Aspect Ratio Thin Airfoil using Drop-Plies. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2010. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0041819


University of Florida

2. Steward, Cody. Virtually learning to sail.

Degree: 2013, University of Florida

The aim of my project is to create a virtual trainer for windsurfing. The skill of sailing

Subjects/Keywords: Assets; Compasses; Imports; Sailboards; Sailing; Sails; Teachers; Training devices; Video games; Wind surfing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Steward, C. (2013). Virtually learning to sail. (Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00017128

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Steward, Cody. “Virtually learning to sail.” 2013. Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00017128.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Steward, Cody. “Virtually learning to sail.” 2013. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Steward C. Virtually learning to sail. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Florida; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00017128.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Steward C. Virtually learning to sail. [Thesis]. University of Florida; 2013. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00017128

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Waikato

3. Scarfe, Bradley Edward. Oceanographic Considerations for the Management and Protection of Surfing Breaks .

Degree: 2008, University of Waikato

Although the physical characteristics of surfing breaks are well described in the literature, there is little specific research on surfing and coastal management. Such research is required because coastal engineering has had significant impacts to surfing breaks, both positive and negative. Strategic planning and environmental impact assessment methods, a central tenet of integrated coastal zone management (ICZM), are recommended by this thesis to maximise surfing amenities. The research reported here identifies key oceanographic considerations required for ICZM around surfing breaks including: surfing wave parameters; surfing break components; relationship between surfer skill, surfing manoeuvre type and wave parameters; wind effects on waves; currents; geomorphic surfing break categorisation; beach-state and morphology; and offshore wave transformations. Key coastal activities that can have impacts to surfing breaks are identified. Environmental data types to consider during coastal studies around surfing breaks are presented and geographic information systems (GIS) are used to manage and interpret such information. To monitor surfing breaks, a shallow water multibeam echo sounding system was utilised and a RTK GPS water level correction and hydrographic GIS methodology developed. Including surfing in coastal management requires coastal engineering solutions that incorporate surfing. As an example, the efficacy of the artificial surfing reef (ASR) at Mount Maunganui, New Zealand, was evaluated. GIS, multibeam echo soundings, oceanographic measurements, photography, and wave modelling were all applied to monitor sea floor morphology around the reef. Results showed that the beach-state has more cellular circulation since the reef was installed, and a groin effect on the offshore bar was caused by the structure within the monitoring period, trapping sediment updrift and eroding sediment downdrift. No identifiable shoreline salient was observed. Landward of the reef, a scour hole ~3 times the surface area of the reef has formed. The current literature on ASRs has primarily focused on reef shape and its role in creating surfing waves. However, this study suggests that impacts to the offshore bar, beach-state, scour hole and surf zone hydrodynamics should all be included in future surfing reef designs. More real world reef studies, including ongoing monitoring of existing surfing reefs are required to validate theoretical concepts in the published literature.

Subjects/Keywords: Aramoana Beach Dunedin (New Zealand); ArcGIS; ArcSDE; artificial surfing reef; backscatter; Baseline Data Collection; bathymetry; bathymetric surveying; beach morphodynamics; beach-state and morphology; breaking wave height; coastal engineering; coastal environment; coastal management; coastal monitoring; coastal processes; coastal structures; currents; economic value; EIA; environmental data management; environmental impact assessment; geographic information systems; geoid; geomorphic surfing break categorisation; GIS; groin; hydrodynamic modelling; hydrographic surveying; hydrography; ICZM; incline plane modelling; integrated coastal zone management; Main Beach Mount Maunganui (New Zealand); Manu Bay Boat Ramp Raglan (New Zealand); measuring water levels; Mission Bay Jetties San Diego (California); morphological coupling; multibeam echo soundings; oceanography; offshore wave transformations; Palm Beach Reefs Gold Coast (Australia); relationship between surfer skill surfing manoeuvre type and wave parameters; RTK GPS; salient; surf zone hydrodynamics; surfing break components; surfing reefs; surfing tourism; surfing wave climate; surfing wave parameters; Tay Street Mount Maunganui (New Zealand); The Whangamata Bar Whangamata (New Zealand); wave breaking intensity; wave climate; wave focusing; wave modelling; wave peel angle; wave section length; wind effects on waves

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Scarfe, B. E. (2008). Oceanographic Considerations for the Management and Protection of Surfing Breaks . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/2668

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scarfe, Bradley Edward. “Oceanographic Considerations for the Management and Protection of Surfing Breaks .” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/2668.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scarfe, Bradley Edward. “Oceanographic Considerations for the Management and Protection of Surfing Breaks .” 2008. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Scarfe BE. Oceanographic Considerations for the Management and Protection of Surfing Breaks . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2008. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/2668.

Council of Science Editors:

Scarfe BE. Oceanographic Considerations for the Management and Protection of Surfing Breaks . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/2668

.