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You searched for subject:(William H Whyte). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Texas A&M University

1. Gulati, Nidhi 1986-. The Social Life of Steeplechase Park: Neighborhood Dog-Park as a "Third Place.

Degree: 2012, Texas A&M University

In the United States, there is a growing trend towards livable cities that facilitate physical, psychological, and social well-being. According to Congress of the New Urbanism, the great American suburb served by the automobile, does not fulfill all these functions. Urban sociologist Ray Oldenburg points out three realms of satisfactory life as work, home and the ?great good place? as the third. The third place is one that facilitates barrier free social interaction, for example the American main-street, the English pub, French coffee house etc. Despite the ever existing need for such places, greater travel distances and the ever expanding needs of the automobile era have stripped our urban fabric of these. The Charter of the New Urbanism points out that in the American suburbs, neighborhood parks have the potential to serve as ?third places.? The twofold purpose of this research was to examine Steeplechase dog-park using Oldenburg?s Third Place construct as a starting point; and then to operationalize third place by establishing relationships between social characteristics and physical environment. Participant observation, casual conversations and ethnographic interviews were methods used to examine how residents use Steeplechase Park. The observation phase was used to understand on-site behavior, user interests and then establish contacts with participants for recruitment. In-depth interviews were then conducted to examine user history, relationships and attitudes toward the place. Data was coded and analyzed in NVivo 10 utilizing Oldenburg?s framework as a reference, the components of which were then examined for correlations to the physical elements. The findings of suggest that Steeplechase Park functions as a somewhat unique third place in terms of user motivation, companion animal/social lubricant, neutrality and inclusiveness of the place. Findings also establish useful links between the physical design of the space and the social activity; prospect-refuge supported by vegetation and layout, topography, shade, edges and access being the most important aspects. Additionally, lack of maintenance was established as a major concern to sustained use. Advisors/Committee Members: Shafer, C. Scott (advisor), Scott, David (committee member), Lee, Chanam (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Third Place; Ray Oldenburg; Social Well-being; New Urbanism; Place-less-ness; Sense of place; Neighborhood Park; Dog park; Ethnography; Physical Design; William H. Whyte

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gulati, N. 1. (2012). The Social Life of Steeplechase Park: Neighborhood Dog-Park as a "Third Place. (Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148293

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gulati, Nidhi 1986-. “The Social Life of Steeplechase Park: Neighborhood Dog-Park as a "Third Place.” 2012. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148293.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gulati, Nidhi 1986-. “The Social Life of Steeplechase Park: Neighborhood Dog-Park as a "Third Place.” 2012. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Gulati N1. The Social Life of Steeplechase Park: Neighborhood Dog-Park as a "Third Place. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148293.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gulati N1. The Social Life of Steeplechase Park: Neighborhood Dog-Park as a "Third Place. [Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/148293

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


The Ohio State University

2. Russell, Lisa Lee. Observed social behavior of pedestrians in a shopping center parking lot.

Degree: Master of City and Regional Planning, City and Regional Planning, 2006, The Ohio State University

This study sought to discover the kinds of social behavior among pedestrians in a shopping center parking lot. A pilot study looked for social behaviors in three shopping center parking lots. Systematic unobtrusive observation revealed actual patterns of social behavior among moving and stationary pedestrians. Typical behaviors were noted and a coding sheet was developed for the final study at one parking lot. The kinds of social behavior observed included conversations, talking on cell phones, and playing. Many planners promote fostering social behavior in pedestrian environments. Some have argued the best places to enhance behavior are places where people attempt the behavior naturally. Planners disagree on whether parking lots should be promoted as civic spaces, and the question is open whether pedestrian-oriented site design can foster social behavior in shopping center parking lots. Advisors/Committee Members: Nasar, Jack (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: urban planning; city planning; livable space; parking lots; unobtrusive observation; social behavior of pedestrians; ecological observation; pedestrian-oriented design; Lennox Town Center; urban design of parking lots; Jane Jacobs; William H. Whyte

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Russell, L. L. (2006). Observed social behavior of pedestrians in a shopping center parking lot. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1201476147

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Russell, Lisa Lee. “Observed social behavior of pedestrians in a shopping center parking lot.” 2006. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1201476147.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Russell, Lisa Lee. “Observed social behavior of pedestrians in a shopping center parking lot.” 2006. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Russell LL. Observed social behavior of pedestrians in a shopping center parking lot. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2006. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1201476147.

Council of Science Editors:

Russell LL. Observed social behavior of pedestrians in a shopping center parking lot. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2006. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1201476147

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