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You searched for subject:(William Dampier). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Errington, Jeffrey James. “Horatio Dawn” and “Invisibly somewhere between the two clauses”.

Degree: 2017, University of Adelaide

“Horatio Dawn” is a novel set in the late seventeenth century and draws on the figure of the pirate, scientist and explorer William Dampier and his “discovery” of Australia. This imaginary work examines the meeting of British people in the Enlightenment period with Aboriginal people and, in doing so, dramatises the complexities of first contact and its after-effects in modern Australia. The direct influence of Dampier on Australian colonisation was real. Adrian Mitchell notes that Dampier’s view of Australia as a land of lack (as a place that needed to be invested with labour, farmed, built upon and changed) “influenced the attitudes of Joseph Banks, Matthew Flinders and the early European settlers a century later; and over the years [Dampier’s] reservations found their way into school texts and informed the attitudes of generations [in Australia]” (ix). This view of the Australian land as needing to be developed resulted in both violence towards Aboriginal people and, as Henry Reynolds argues, denial of that violence around the end of the nineteenth century, as Australia moved towards federation (60). By 1962 this had, according to Stanner, become a “cult of forgetfulness practiced on a national scale” (189). “Horatio Dawn” starts with a pirate named Cutstone washing up on the shore of the protagonist Horatio Dawn’s farm. Cutstone, while recovering, shares stories about exotic places and mentions the great Captain William Dampier. After Cutstone departs, Dawn becomes sick with plague and subsequently experiences visions. He starts to lose his mind as he drifts from his family’s farm in the north of England towards London. He undergoes various picaresque adventures on the road. In London he meets a strange man named Joram who wears a plague doctor’s mask. Eventually Dawn finds work as a clerk at the archives of the East India Trading Company. The Company organises for Dampier’s release from jail in order to lead a voyage to New Holland. Once they depart for the new land, the narrative fragments. They capture a second ship that Joram decides to captain. Dampier slowly goes insane as he comes to identify with Jeronimus, the psychopathic murderer who led the brutal Batavia mutiny. During a wild storm, lightning strikes Dampier and he becomes incoherent. The crew is planning a mutiny when land appears and Dampier, Dawn and Samantha are put ashore. When his ship arrives, Joram starts to hunt all three. Dampier dies while starting a large bush fire. Eventually they make it back to London for a fateful return to the Royal Society’s headquarters and the archive. Dawn is captured, given a mock trial and executed. A final fragmented section presents the monster of William Dampier as he emerges from the grave and travels across the continent to arrive at Sydney and witness the foundation of the settlement. The accompanying exegesis starts with a general introduction to William Dampier, featuring major events in his life. I examine traditional Dampier scholarship and biographies to see how he is consistently presented in the… Advisors/Committee Members: Jose, Nicholas (advisor), Butterss, Philip (advisor), School of Humanities (school).

Subjects/Keywords: creative writing; historical fiction; counterhistory; William Dampier

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Errington, J. J. (2017). “Horatio Dawn” and “Invisibly somewhere between the two clauses”. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/114430

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Errington, Jeffrey James. ““Horatio Dawn” and “Invisibly somewhere between the two clauses”.” 2017. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed November 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/114430.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Errington, Jeffrey James. ““Horatio Dawn” and “Invisibly somewhere between the two clauses”.” 2017. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Errington JJ. “Horatio Dawn” and “Invisibly somewhere between the two clauses”. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/114430.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Errington JJ. “Horatio Dawn” and “Invisibly somewhere between the two clauses”. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/114430

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Druckman, Risha Druckman Amadea. The Nature of the Wind: Myth, Fact, and Faith in the Development of Wind Knowledge in Early Modern England .

Degree: 2015, Duke University

Historically, the wind has functioned in multiple capacities, both physically and symbolically. The following study explores the ways in which natural history, myth and folklore, craft knowledge, and religion contributed to a growing body of knowledge about the wind at a moment in British history when wind knowledge assumed unprecedented political and economic significance. How did people come to know the wind and to narrate and communicate wind knowledge in the seventeenth century? What work did these complex and competing narrations perform? And what do they make visible? In pursuing these lines of inquiry, my work brings together three principle bodies of knowledge: Environmental History, History of Science, and British Imperial history; and it draws upon documents that include scientific treatises, written records of oral anecdotes and weather wising, religious sermons, travel narratives, fictional novels, and imperial correspondence. I argue that because the wind and wind knowledge were ubiquitous to the emerging success and identity of the British empire, a great variety of historical actors sought to control and narrate what wind knowledge was, where it came from, and what political work it should do. These efforts were unequivocally rooted in first hand experience and observation of the wind – maker's knowledge – and created what I call an intellectual commons that enabled commoners as well as elites to shape and briefly control the contours of wind knowledge in early Modern Britain and its expanding empire. Advisors/Committee Members: Peck, Gunther W (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: History; History of science; European history; Commons; Empire; Francis Bacon; Labor; William Dampier; Wind Knowledge

…buccaneer,!explorer,!and!natural!philosopher!William!Dampier.!Dampier!emerges!as! an!emblematic… …and!William!Dampier!exemplify! relatively!ordered!and!regimented!intellectual!approaches!to… …William!Cronon,!(New!York:!W.W.!Norton,!1995),!171`185;!Kathryn!Morse,!The*Nature*of… …Wang,!1995);!William!Cronon,!Natures*Metropolis:* Chicago*and*the*Great*West!(New… …Basalla,!“The!Spread!of!Western!Science”!in!William!K.!Storey,!ed.,!Scientific*Aspects*of… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Druckman, R. D. A. (2015). The Nature of the Wind: Myth, Fact, and Faith in the Development of Wind Knowledge in Early Modern England . (Thesis). Duke University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10161/9960

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Druckman, Risha Druckman Amadea. “The Nature of the Wind: Myth, Fact, and Faith in the Development of Wind Knowledge in Early Modern England .” 2015. Thesis, Duke University. Accessed November 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10161/9960.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Druckman, Risha Druckman Amadea. “The Nature of the Wind: Myth, Fact, and Faith in the Development of Wind Knowledge in Early Modern England .” 2015. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Druckman RDA. The Nature of the Wind: Myth, Fact, and Faith in the Development of Wind Knowledge in Early Modern England . [Internet] [Thesis]. Duke University; 2015. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/9960.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Druckman RDA. The Nature of the Wind: Myth, Fact, and Faith in the Development of Wind Knowledge in Early Modern England . [Thesis]. Duke University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/9960

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


California State University – Sacramento

3. Jackson, Aaron James. Hostes humani generis: piracy on the tides of empire in the Age of Sail.

Degree: MA, History, 2016, California State University – Sacramento

Pirates are a fascinating subject, inspiring authors and filmmakers alike with dramatic and romantic tales of daring and adventure to create works of fiction like Treasure Island, Peter Pan, and Pirates of the Caribbean. Pirates have inspired historians to explore topics ranging from the pirate crews' proto-democratic organization to their role in developing world systems of trade and cultural exchange. Few, however, have examined how pirates helped to establish the great European maritime empires, which emerged from the relative backwater of sixteenth-century Europe to conquer distant lands and peoples, master global trade winds and tides, and muscle their way into every corner of the globe by the nineteenth century. Emerging theories in the discipline of world history appear to provide the most promising explanations of European ascendancy by emphasizing global systemic connections and contingencies. Systemic explorations of economic connections and commodities have provided historians with a much better understanding of the past, and this exploration of piracy fits this mold. Piracy was both a form of economic connection and commodity, particularly when defined as the use of violence to achieve economic gains. As this paper will show, Europe's maritime empires, and the British Empire in particular, traded this commodity heavily between the late-fifteenth and early-nineteenth centuries. The Early Modern Era was a bigger world than the one we occupy today. Reliant upon the trade winds and favorable seas to connect the imperial metropole with its colonies, the British Empire relied on a collection of frontiers to fuel its economic engines. In these frontiers, pirates helped build the British Empire, their crimes later justified its centralized authority and the state monopoly on violence, and their continued existence served as a laboratory for developing new methods of international power relations. In these ways and more, pirates deserve a great deal more credit and attention from scholarly circles. Unfortunately for historians, pirates rarely left detailed documents outlining their actions and motives, but Subaltern Studies methodology provides a potential solution. While researching colonial Indian peasant uprisings against the British for his 1983 book, Elementary Aspects of Peasant Insurgency in Colonial India, Ranajit Guha encountered difficulties in finding primary source material portraying the peasants??? perspectives, which is not surprising given that colonial Indian peasants were largely illiterate. Guha could discern their perspectives by deciphering coded language in the abundance of British documents???by reading against the grain of the biased documentary record. Similarly, the clear majority of primary source material on piracy originates from official British documents, including trial transcripts, colonial correspondence, the occasional journal entry, and contemporary literature and newspaper articles. The government sources are often biased, of course, but Guha???s methodology… Advisors/Committee Members: Vann, Michael G..

Subjects/Keywords: Imperialism; Piracy; World History; Armed Mercantilism; European Exceptionalism; Western Exceptionalism; Eurocentrism; Hegemony; Buccaneers; Corsairs; Pirates; Privateers; Sir John Hawkins; Sir Francis Drake; Sir Henry Morgan; East India Company; William Dampier; Free Trade; Jack Tar; Libertalia; Mutiny; Indian Ocean; Atlantic Ocean; Henry Avery; New Providence Colony; Benjamin Hornigold and the Flying Gang; Black Sam Bellamy; Edward Thatch; Edward Teach; Nassau; Blackbeard; Charleston; Woodes Rogers; China Trade; Turkey Trade; Barbary Wars; Gunboat Diplomacy; Opium Trade

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jackson, A. J. (2016). Hostes humani generis: piracy on the tides of empire in the Age of Sail. (Masters Thesis). California State University – Sacramento. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/182663

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jackson, Aaron James. “Hostes humani generis: piracy on the tides of empire in the Age of Sail.” 2016. Masters Thesis, California State University – Sacramento. Accessed November 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/182663.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jackson, Aaron James. “Hostes humani generis: piracy on the tides of empire in the Age of Sail.” 2016. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Jackson AJ. Hostes humani generis: piracy on the tides of empire in the Age of Sail. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. California State University – Sacramento; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/182663.

Council of Science Editors:

Jackson AJ. Hostes humani generis: piracy on the tides of empire in the Age of Sail. [Masters Thesis]. California State University – Sacramento; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/182663

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