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You searched for subject:(Who is Nobody). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Brock University

1. Miller, Ashley. A Case Study of the "Who is NOBODY?" Project: A Character Development Program for Children with Learning Disabilities .

Degree: Department of Child and Youth Studies, 2014, Brock University

This research study explored a support system for children with learning disabilities. The Learning Disabilities Association of Niagara Region (LDANR) recently expanded its Better Emotional and Social Times (B.E.S.T.) program to incorporate an innovative, character education initiative called the “Who is NOBODY?” program. The objective of this qualitative case study was two-fold. First, the study aimed to support the LDANR in assessing the efficacy of the “Who is NOBODY?” program, providing the LDANR with empirical support for their programs. Second, the study enabled a more in-depth understanding of how to best support children with LD in regards to their social and emotional well-being. The study explored the “Who is NOBODY?” program through three lenses: design, implementation, and experiences of participating children. Three primary themes emerged from these three data lenses: positive character traits, prosocial behaviour, and strong self-efficacy – leading to the promotion of strong character development and self-esteem. Taken together, the “Who is NOBODY?” program was shown to be a successful remediation program for supporting vulnerable children with LD.

Subjects/Keywords: "Who is NOBODY?" Program; Character Development; Self-Esteem; Children; Learning Disabilities

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Miller, A. (2014). A Case Study of the "Who is NOBODY?" Project: A Character Development Program for Children with Learning Disabilities . (Thesis). Brock University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10464/5224

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miller, Ashley. “A Case Study of the "Who is NOBODY?" Project: A Character Development Program for Children with Learning Disabilities .” 2014. Thesis, Brock University. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10464/5224.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miller, Ashley. “A Case Study of the "Who is NOBODY?" Project: A Character Development Program for Children with Learning Disabilities .” 2014. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Miller A. A Case Study of the "Who is NOBODY?" Project: A Character Development Program for Children with Learning Disabilities . [Internet] [Thesis]. Brock University; 2014. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10464/5224.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Miller A. A Case Study of the "Who is NOBODY?" Project: A Character Development Program for Children with Learning Disabilities . [Thesis]. Brock University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10464/5224

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Toronto

2. Neves, Ana Cristina Trindade. A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum.

Degree: 2009, University of Toronto

This study is an interpretive form of qualitative research that is founded in educational connoisseurship and criticism, which uses the author’s personal experiences as a holistic educator in a public school to connect theory and practice. Key research questions include: How do I, as a teacher, work with the Ontario curriculum to make it more holistic? What strategies have I developed in order to teach a more holistic curriculum? What kinds of difficulties interfere with my practice as I attempt to implement my holistic philosophy of education? This dissertation seeks to articulate a methodology for developing holistic curriculum that is in conformity with Ontario Ministry guidelines and is also responsive to the multifaceted needs of the whole student. The research findings will serve to inform teachers who wish to engage in holistic education in public schools and adopt a curriculum that is transformative while still being adaptable within mainstream education.

MAST

Advisors/Committee Members: Miller, John P., Cohen, Rina, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning.

Subjects/Keywords: holistic education; holistic learning; holistic teacher; holistic curriculum; curriculum development; Ontario curriculum; transformative curriculum; holistic philosophy of education; developing mindfulness; meditation in schools; visualization as a learning tool; yoga in schools; journal writing; Gulu walk; An Inconvenient Truth; Uganda Rising; anti-bullying education; human wholeness; Whole Child School; personal development; professional development; personal practical knowledge in teachers; educational connoisseurship and criticism; empowering students; Math trail; pedagogical approaches; autobiography; parents as partners in education; EQAO testing; student-led conferences; self awareness; balance in education; limited vision of Ontario curriculum; tensions between Holistic education and the Ontario curriculum; critical literacy ideology; ommission on the Whole Child; spirituality in education; anecdotal reporting to parents; social consciousness; Roots of Empathy; Who is Nobody; spiritual growth; ecological awareness; wholeness of human experience; creativity and intuition in education; 0727; 0524; 0280; 0998

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Neves, A. C. T. (2009). A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Neves, Ana Cristina Trindade. “A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Neves, Ana Cristina Trindade. “A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum.” 2009. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Neves ACT. A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107.

Council of Science Editors:

Neves ACT. A Holistic Approach to the Ontario Curriculum: Moving to a More Coherent Curriculum. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/18107

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