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You searched for subject:(White Trash Studies). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Bowling Green State University

1. Burnell, Aaron C. Nobody's Darlings: Reading White Trash in Supernatural.

Degree: MA, American Culture Studies/English, 2011, Bowling Green State University

Hunting things and saving people. This is the plot and purpose of Eric Kripke's ongoing CW series Supernatural on the most surface level. Despite the overt fantasy which frames the series, it is better defined as a drama which explores the depths of notonly family but also class. Fans and critics both have discussed the ways in which Kripke was constructed family and masculinity. Oddly, though, discussions of class have been surprisingly sparse in both critical and fan circles. Likewise, there is only a small pool of literature that focuses on the theoretical and lived experience of white trash. White trash, of course, is in and of itself a term that is hotly debated. What does it mean? Who does it include? Is it even real? Who is included within the umbrella of white trash? Who decides who fits within this rubric? Through out this project, these two discourses will be joined together in order to broaden the scope of conversations within both spheres. Chapters including the genealogy of white trash, the aesthetics and commodification of white trash, and the construction of a specifically homosocial white trash family use Supernatural as a case study for the ways in which contemporary meditated American culture views or, more aptly, does not view class. Advisors/Committee Members: Gajjala, Radhika (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: American Studies; supernatural; thesis; nobody's darlings; reading white trash in supernatural; white trash; homosocial; family; working class; aesthetics; commoditiy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Burnell, A. C. (2011). Nobody's Darlings: Reading White Trash in Supernatural. (Masters Thesis). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1305054871

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burnell, Aaron C. “Nobody's Darlings: Reading White Trash in Supernatural.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed December 12, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1305054871.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burnell, Aaron C. “Nobody's Darlings: Reading White Trash in Supernatural.” 2011. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Burnell AC. Nobody's Darlings: Reading White Trash in Supernatural. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1305054871.

Council of Science Editors:

Burnell AC. Nobody's Darlings: Reading White Trash in Supernatural. [Masters Thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2011. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1305054871


University of Cincinnati

2. Branscum, John. One in the Head: A White Trash Memoir.

Degree: PhD, Arts and Sciences: English and Comparative Literature, 2010, University of Cincinnati

This dissertation consists of two parts: One in the Head: A White Trash Memoir, a spiritual memoir, and a scholarly article entitled “The Haunting of Days: The Use of Temporal Models in William Kennedy’s Ironweed.” The memoir, One in the Head, offers a study of spiritual conversion rooted in the socio-cultural particularities of lower class America, and a detailed examination of the racial and class politics that accompanies social ascension. A range of characters – including a violent teenage criminal who plays the protagonist, a non-practicing homosexual politician and mystic, a lower-class homophobic mathematical genius, the schizophrenic sister and itinerant father of the protagonist, and a single mother in pursuit of the perfect man – navigate the trials and tribulations that arise from dysfunctional families, poverty, the conflict between the individual experience of spirituality and particular religious traditions, and the myriad social scripts of masculinity and femininity. Through first person narration, the author explores these subjects through the concept of demonic possession in both metaphorical and literal elaborations, including the influence of words, stories, and other personalities. Combining the tropes and techniques of magical realism with the genre trappings of memoir, the book’s disparate sections are tied together through a progression through the stages of the mystical journey: awakening, the dark night of the soul, purgation, illumination, and unity. While tracing these stages, the book also complicates them via continuously drawing alternately on sacred and secular temporal models and materialist and ideational realities. The critical section entitled “The Haunting of Days: The Use of Temporal Models in William Kennedy’s Ironweed,” is connected to the memoir by virtue of the fact that it explores a similar tension between the material and spiritual realms. The article investigates the use of both sacred and secular models of temporality in contemporary fiction in general, and William Kennedy’s Ironweed in particular. After examining the political consequences of materialist linear, archetypal cyclical, and qualitative rhythmic models of time, and their associated worldviews – evident in fantastic and realist modes of literature, the author examines how rhythmic time offers a psychologically more accurate and existentially more useful model of both linearity and cyclicity. The author concludes that a rhythmic model of time successfully overcomes the subordination of the individual body to cosmic archetypes, which is an inescapable consequence of the cyclical model of time, as well as the loss of psychological meaning and the depiction of the individual body as an ever-decaying object, which arises from a materialist linear model of time. The author argues that through this elaboration of these other models of time, rhythmic time is a model that embraces both the material and spiritual worlds, and makes room for the cohabitation of both ideational and materialist philosophies. Advisors/Committee Members: Griffith, Michael (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: American Literature; Fantastic Literature; Memoir; White Trash Studies; Religion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Branscum, J. (2010). One in the Head: A White Trash Memoir. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1281989306

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Branscum, John. “One in the Head: A White Trash Memoir.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cincinnati. Accessed December 12, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1281989306.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Branscum, John. “One in the Head: A White Trash Memoir.” 2010. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Branscum J. One in the Head: A White Trash Memoir. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1281989306.

Council of Science Editors:

Branscum J. One in the Head: A White Trash Memoir. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2010. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1281989306

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