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You searched for subject:(Walter Mondale). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Minnesota

1. Benya, Frazier. Biomedical advances confront society:congressional hearings and the development of bioethics, 1960-1975.

Degree: PhD, 2012, University of Minnesota

In 1974 the first federal bioethics commission was created to examine the ethics and policies on biomedical research with human subjects. The idea of having a federal bioethics commission has continued since, with new presidents creating new commissions to replace their predecessor's commission. Six years before the first commission was created, Senator Walter Mondale proposed for the first time the idea of such a commission, which would examine the ethics and social implications of a wide range of biomedical research topics in an interdisciplinary manner. This dissertation specifically examines how the federal government became an influential venue for discussing bioethics and identifying ethical, social, and legal issues with research, and how social implications concerns developed and became part of bioethics. It reveals how during the 1960s those inside and outside biomedical research identified bioethical issues and debated their social responsibility, and how Congress become increasingly interested in the research that they were funding as well as in its implications on society. Throughout the chapters this dissertation follows the development of the field of bioethics, adding on to it with the history of the government's role in bioethics and with the details of social implications concerns that were distinct from concerns over medical ethics or human experimentation ethics. I argue that three key senators, Walter F. Mondale (D-MN), Fred Harris (D-OK), and Edward Kennedy (D-MA), worked with and also challenged the assertions of physicians and researchers on the need to examine social consequences of biomedicine, and in that process they dramatically reshaped the involvement of non-scientists and non-physicians in discussions of biomedical research. These Senators also brought public attention to difficult issues in biomedicine and established a public realm for bioethics discussions.

Subjects/Keywords: Bioethics; Fred R. Harris; National Commission; Social Implications; Social Responsibility; Walter F. Mondale

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Benya, F. (2012). Biomedical advances confront society:congressional hearings and the development of bioethics, 1960-1975. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://purl.umn.edu/141246

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Benya, Frazier. “Biomedical advances confront society:congressional hearings and the development of bioethics, 1960-1975.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Minnesota. Accessed December 05, 2019. http://purl.umn.edu/141246.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Benya, Frazier. “Biomedical advances confront society:congressional hearings and the development of bioethics, 1960-1975.” 2012. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Benya F. Biomedical advances confront society:congressional hearings and the development of bioethics, 1960-1975. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/141246.

Council of Science Editors:

Benya F. Biomedical advances confront society:congressional hearings and the development of bioethics, 1960-1975. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2012. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/141246


Georgia State University

2. Underwood, Aubrey. The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987.

Degree: History, 2011, Georgia State University

This dissertation examines how the major television networks, in conjunction with the Reagan administration, launched a lingering cloud of nuclear anxiety that helped to revive the Cold War during the 1980s. Placed within a larger political and cultural post-war context, this national preoccupation with a global show-down with the Soviet Union at times both hindered and bolstered Reagan’s image as the archetypal conservative, cowboy President that could free America from its liberal adolescent past now caustically referred to as “the sixties.” This stalwart image of Reagan, created and carefully managed by a number of highly-paid marketing executives, as one of the embodiment of peaceful deterrence, came under attack in the early 1980s when the “liberal” Nuclear Freeze movement showed signs of becoming politically threatening to the staunch conservative pledging to win the Cold War at any cost. And even if the nuclear freeze movement itself was not powerful enough to undergo the Herculean task of removing the President in 1984, the movement was compassionate enough to appeal to a mass audience, especially when framed in narrative form on network television. In the early 1980s, debates over the possibility of nuclear war and other pertinent Cold War related issues became much more democratized in their visibility on the network airwaves. However, the message disseminated from the networks was not placed in an educational framework, nor did these television productions clarify complicated nuclear issues such as nuclear winter theory and proliferation. I argue this renewed network attention on nuclear issues was not placed in an historical framework and likely confused American viewers because it routinely exposed audiences to both fact and fiction, undifferentiated at the level of the mass media. Advisors/Committee Members: Michelle Brattain, Joe Perry, Kathy Fuller-Seeley.

Subjects/Keywords: Ronald Reagan; Cold War; Network television; Made-for-television movies; World War III; Special Bulletin; The Day After; Threads; Amerika; Nuclear freeze movement; Nuclear winter theory; Nuclear weapons; Strategic Defensive Initiative; “Star Wars; ; Great Nuclear Arms Debate; Infotainment; “Morning in America campaign” 1984 US Presidential Campaign; Walter Mondale; History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Underwood, A. (2011). The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/history_diss/27

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Underwood, Aubrey. “The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987.” 2011. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed December 05, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/history_diss/27.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Underwood, Aubrey. “The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987.” 2011. Web. 05 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Underwood A. The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 05]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/history_diss/27.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Underwood A. The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/history_diss/27

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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