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You searched for subject:(WBGT Risk Index). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Boston University

1. Gaulin, Christopher Lee. Understanding climate change risks to the United States military.

Degree: 2019, Boston University

The Department of Defense (DoD) has acknowledged climate change as a risk national security. Ongoing impacts include the loss of training and operational sites to climate hazards. Operationally, conflict and natural disasters around the world have been exacerbated by increasing heat, desertification, and flooding. Increasing average temperatures, the flagship issue of climate change, is a significant contributor to heat-illness in military personnel. This project explores the relationship between climate change and the U.S. military, ongoing efforts to evaluate and address the risk, and the overall impacts on training readiness. Measuring climate related vulnerability is a complex process. For the DoD to apply a common framework across a vast network of fundamentally different sites is an especially wicked problem. I recommend a tiered approach to iteratively narrow the focus and resources allocated to the most mission critical and at-risk sites. The process begins with a screening survey, continues to in-depth site-specific impact assessments, and ends with implementation of technical and institutional adaptations. Recent efforts by the DoD have not fully executed this process and resulting reports are resultingly insufficient. I identify a lack of consideration for heat stress on servicemembers. Using historical site data and projections, I determine that the risk of heat-illness and lost training time will increase. Leaders can use this data to plan risk mitigation efforts through changing training locations, timing, or control measures. The military must continue to adapt and overcome challenges of the coming century by using available scientific information to reduce risk during the planning process. Advisors/Committee Members: Baldwin, James G. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Geography; Climate risk; Climate security; Competitive space; Heat index; National security; WBGT

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gaulin, C. L. (2019). Understanding climate change risks to the United States military. (Thesis). Boston University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2144/37103

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gaulin, Christopher Lee. “Understanding climate change risks to the United States military.” 2019. Thesis, Boston University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2144/37103.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gaulin, Christopher Lee. “Understanding climate change risks to the United States military.” 2019. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Gaulin CL. Understanding climate change risks to the United States military. [Internet] [Thesis]. Boston University; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/37103.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gaulin CL. Understanding climate change risks to the United States military. [Thesis]. Boston University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/37103

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Georgia

2. Cooper, Earl Robert. Monitoring environmental conditions at five southeastern universities.

Degree: 2014, University of Georgia

Athletic trainers must consider environmental conditions when making decisions concerning football practices. Those working in southern settings are faced with stressful environmental conditions often associated with the late summer and early fall. Strategies to minimize heat stress include proper acclimatization, hydration, conditioning, heat illness recognition, and weather monitoring. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of exertional heat illness (EHI) in athletes during a three month period (August-October) at five southeastern universities. The Heat Stroke Checker (KEM Kyoto Electronics Manufacturing Ltd; Japan) was used to measure environmental conditions three times a day at each location. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and Department of Defense (DOD) Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) Heat Stress Index Charts were used to identify the levels of heat illness risk. Heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and hyponatremia were evaluated based on the NATA Exertional Heat Illness position statement. A reportable injury was any athlete who incurred a heat related illness evaluated by the medical staff. A total of 139 heat-illnesses were reported with an EHI rate of 4.19/1000 athlete-exposures (AE) during the three-month period. No cases of heat stroke or hyponatremia were reported. Evaluating each month individually, the greatest number of EHI’s occurred during August (88%) with an EHI rate of 8.95/1000 AE. During August, the EHI rate was 6.31/1000 AE for heat cramps, 2.06/1000 AE for heat exhaustion and 0.58/1000 AE for heat syncope. Pearson correlations between the ACSM and DOD Heat Stress Index Charts and specific heat illnesses were not statistically significant relationships (p>.05). In our study we found a higher heat exhaustion injury rate compared to the NCAA surveillance data possibly due to differences in EHI definitions and reporting mechanisms. The incidence of heat illness in the months of September and October decreased dramatically, suggesting football athletes are at greatest risk of heat illness during August. Our data suggests that during the late summer, previously reported guidelines may overstate the risk of heat illness in highly trained football athletes practicing with the southeastern United States. The development of regionally specific heat index guidelines is recommended.

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Exposure; Environmental Heat Stress; Exertional Heat Illness; Heat Injuries; Heat Stress; Heat Stress Characteristics; Heat Stress Index; WBGT; WBGT Risk Index

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cooper, E. R. (2014). Monitoring environmental conditions at five southeastern universities. (Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10724/21792

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cooper, Earl Robert. “Monitoring environmental conditions at five southeastern universities.” 2014. Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10724/21792.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cooper, Earl Robert. “Monitoring environmental conditions at five southeastern universities.” 2014. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Cooper ER. Monitoring environmental conditions at five southeastern universities. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/21792.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cooper ER. Monitoring environmental conditions at five southeastern universities. [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/21792

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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