Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(W500 Dance). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Douse, Louise Emma. Moving experience : an investigation of embodied knowledge and technology for reading flow in improvisation.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Bedfordshire

The thesis is concerned with the exploration of the notion of ‘flow’ from both a psychological and dance analysis perspective in order to extend the meaning of flow and move beyond a partiality of understanding. The main aim of the thesis recognises the need to understand, identify and interpret an analysis of the moments of flow perceivable in a dancer’s body during improvisatory practice, through technologically innovative means. The research is undertaken via both philosophical and practical enquiry. It addresses phenomenology in order to resolve the mind/body debate and is applied to research in flow in psychology by Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi, and flow in movement analysis by Rudolf Laban and Warren Lamb. The significance of this endeavour can be seen in the reconsideration of the relation between mind and body, and art and science which informs the methodology for the research (Part One). The three main outcomes of the research are related to each of the three subsequent parts. The first research outcome is the articulation of a transdisciplinary approach to understanding flow and was developed by expanding on the current definitions of flow through an innovative transdisciplinary methodology (Part Two). Research outcome two addresses the intersubjective nature of flow, which was identified within improvisation. From this two methods were constructed for the collection and interpretation of the experience of the dancer. Firstly, through reflective practice as defined by Donald Schön. And secondly, an argument was provided for the use of motion capture as an embodied tool which extends the dancers embodied cognitive capabilities in the moment of improvisation (Part Three). The final research outcome was thus theorised that such embodied empathic intersubjectivity does not require a direct identification of the other’s body but could be achieved through technologically mediated objects in the world (Part Four). Subsequently, the findings from the research could support further research within a number of fields including dance education, dance practice and dance therapy, psychology, neuroscience, gaming and interactive arts.

Subjects/Keywords: 792.8; W500 Dance; flow; dance; improvisation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Douse, L. E. (2013). Moving experience : an investigation of embodied knowledge and technology for reading flow in improvisation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Bedfordshire. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10547/346585

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Douse, Louise Emma. “Moving experience : an investigation of embodied knowledge and technology for reading flow in improvisation.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Bedfordshire. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10547/346585.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Douse, Louise Emma. “Moving experience : an investigation of embodied knowledge and technology for reading flow in improvisation.” 2013. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Douse LE. Moving experience : an investigation of embodied knowledge and technology for reading flow in improvisation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Bedfordshire; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10547/346585.

Council of Science Editors:

Douse LE. Moving experience : an investigation of embodied knowledge and technology for reading flow in improvisation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Bedfordshire; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10547/346585

2. McGrath, Eimir. Beyond integration : reformulating physical disability in dance.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Bedfordshire

Dance performance that is inclusive of dancers with differing corporealities has the potential to generate positive societal change with regard to perceptions of physical difference. Dance is a valuable site for exploring the placement of the physically disabled body in contemporary society, and for disrupting existing perceptions of disability as transgressive. This can come about through the embodied presence of both dancer and viewer, entering into a relationship grounded in intersubjectivity, without having to rely on symbolic signification. This thesis examines the placement of disabled bodies in dance performance from the intersecting perspectives of Critical Disability Studies, Performance Studies and Interpersonal Neurobiology in order to formulate a framework for theorizing perceptions of disability, the act of viewing dance and the impact of choreographic intent on viewers’ perceptions of physical difference. In the first section, the sociopolitical placing of disabled bodies in western society is interrogated and a historiological study of both disability identity and the emergence of integrated dance is critically analysed. The second section provides detailed analyses of three dance performances that are inclusive of dancers with physical disabilities: GIMP (2009), Heidi Latsky, Diagnosis of a Faun (2009) Tamar Rogoff, and water burns sun (2009) Petra Kuppers. Each represents a specific understanding of disability, creating an evolutionary framework for conceptualizing different perceptions of disabled bodies as either monstrous freak, heroic victim or corporeally diverse. The third section creates connections between new knowledge in interpersonal neurobiology and viewers' perceptions of disability that are activated through viewing dance performance, thus providing an understanding of the mechanisms of discrimination and marginalization of people who embody difference, as well as uncovering mechanisms that have the potential to be reparative. The application of neuroscientific knowledge to Performance Studies can be modulated and expanded by considering the interpersonal communicative dimension of dance performance that is inclusive of differing corporealities. A theoretical approach that encompasses the neuroscientific conceptualization of intersubjectivity in creating empathic attunement between viewer and dancer, can offer a means of understanding the innate potential of dance performance to bring about societal change.

Subjects/Keywords: 792.802; W500 Dance; dance; physical disability; disability

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McGrath, E. (2013). Beyond integration : reformulating physical disability in dance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Bedfordshire. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10547/323750

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McGrath, Eimir. “Beyond integration : reformulating physical disability in dance.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Bedfordshire. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10547/323750.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McGrath, Eimir. “Beyond integration : reformulating physical disability in dance.” 2013. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

McGrath E. Beyond integration : reformulating physical disability in dance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Bedfordshire; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10547/323750.

Council of Science Editors:

McGrath E. Beyond integration : reformulating physical disability in dance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Bedfordshire; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10547/323750


University of Central Lancashire

3. Parsons, Lisa. Re-framing the dancer : the critical evaluation of an aesthetic and ideology for integrated dance.

Degree: PhD, 2007, University of Central Lancashire

This research contextualises, evaluates and critically examines specific methodologies for integrated/mixed-ability dance that pertain to re-framing the dancer. Integrated/mixed-ability dance is committed to inclusive practice thereby changing the old order of aesthetics in favour of a new approach. It is this innovative work that this study has documented. The body (in dance) is understood as a complex phenomenon that engages with issues of consciousness, perception and temporality. The synthesis of philosophy (most specifically phenomenology), structuralist theory (with reference to Althusser and Foucault) and creative practice (with specific reference to the work of two contrasting integrated/mixed-ability practitioners), evolves an ideology and aesthetic for integrated/mixed-ability dance that will determine the extent to which - changing the beauty aesthetic in dance can be achieved. The core enquiry is based upon the critical evaluation of the integration of disabled and non-disabled dancers within the practices of Adam Benjamin and Alito Alessi. Their overlapping but divergent methodologies stress issues of embodiment and identity and make a plea for different forms of thinking about how the body is represented in dance. I argue that within integrated/mixed-ability dance, improvisation is an effective learning tool wherein bodily activity is conceptualised as multi-dimensional, inter-modal activity that pertains to ethical and social facilitation. The critical reflective practice and cross-evaluation (from a phenomenological perspective) presents research findings that provide subjective (experiential) and philosophical evidence that contributes to the field of integrated/mixed-ability dance and the wider scholarship of Western contemporary dance. My thesis concludes that: Benjamin and Alessi's methodologies amount to a phenomenological understanding of the dancers' experiences that is significant for evolving integration. I argue that is achieved through perceptual processes and provides effective understanding of the embodied structure of experiences (consciousness) in the space. Concurrently, critical and philosophical analysis presents substantial evidence for the role of sensori-motor (body schema) activity and for the re-conceptualisation of body image. That argument highlights the complexity of the relation between body schema, body image and habit, and pertains to both aesthetic and ethical considerations.

Subjects/Keywords: 792.8; W500 - Dance

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Parsons, L. (2007). Re-framing the dancer : the critical evaluation of an aesthetic and ideology for integrated dance. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Central Lancashire. Retrieved from http://clok.uclan.ac.uk/20275/ ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.727056

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parsons, Lisa. “Re-framing the dancer : the critical evaluation of an aesthetic and ideology for integrated dance.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Central Lancashire. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://clok.uclan.ac.uk/20275/ ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.727056.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parsons, Lisa. “Re-framing the dancer : the critical evaluation of an aesthetic and ideology for integrated dance.” 2007. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Parsons L. Re-framing the dancer : the critical evaluation of an aesthetic and ideology for integrated dance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Central Lancashire; 2007. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://clok.uclan.ac.uk/20275/ ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.727056.

Council of Science Editors:

Parsons L. Re-framing the dancer : the critical evaluation of an aesthetic and ideology for integrated dance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Central Lancashire; 2007. Available from: http://clok.uclan.ac.uk/20275/ ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.727056

.