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You searched for subject:(Vitamin fortified food). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Helsinki

1. Tolosa, Bogale. Use of bio-enriched yeast and stability of its vitamin D2 in wheat dough baking.

Degree: Department of Food and Environmental Sciences; Helsingfors universitet, Agrikultur- och forstvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för livsmedels- och miljövetenskaper, 2015, University of Helsinki

Vitamin D is one of the basic vitamins required by our body for maintaining stable health conditions and to have stronger bone structure. In countries where there is shortage of sunlight exposure (like in Northern European countries) the oral intake of vitamin D either from dietary source or from supplementing tablets is very essential. This study aimed to analyze stability of vitamin D2 originating from bio-enriched yeast in baking process and focused to investigate impact of such yeast on bread quality. Impact of mixing time (intensity), baking temperature-time combinations and effect of two different storage conditions were studied. The presence of vitamin D2 containing bio-enriched yeast as an ingredient didn't affect the quality of bread. Overall breads obtained from all designed protocols have shown low specific volume, fine and evenly distributed porosity on the crumb structure. Variation of mixing time or baking regime did not influence on the stability of vitamin D2. Furthermore, bread storage conditions, which were considered with in this study, didn’t affect the stability of vitamin D2. Vitamin D2 from bioenriched yeast has shown stability in wheat dough baking.

Subjects/Keywords: Vitamin D; Vitamin D fortification; fortified bread; vitamin D2; vitamin D3; Food Science; Food Science; Food Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Tolosa, B. (2015). Use of bio-enriched yeast and stability of its vitamin D2 in wheat dough baking. (Masters Thesis). University of Helsinki. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10138/155770

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tolosa, Bogale. “Use of bio-enriched yeast and stability of its vitamin D2 in wheat dough baking.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Helsinki. Accessed January 21, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10138/155770.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tolosa, Bogale. “Use of bio-enriched yeast and stability of its vitamin D2 in wheat dough baking.” 2015. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Tolosa B. Use of bio-enriched yeast and stability of its vitamin D2 in wheat dough baking. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Helsinki; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/155770.

Council of Science Editors:

Tolosa B. Use of bio-enriched yeast and stability of its vitamin D2 in wheat dough baking. [Masters Thesis]. University of Helsinki; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/155770


University of Alberta

2. Ngo, Sandra. Consumer preferences for different sources of vitamin A in Odisha, India and Alberta, Canada.

Degree: MS, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, 2016, University of Alberta

min A deficiency is a form of malnutrition that affects 127 million people globally, leading to increased risk of infection, ocular disorders, and/or impaired growth (WHO 2004). There are multiple ways to increase vitamin A intake including supplements, whole, fortified, and biofortified foods. Given that it may be in policymakers’ best interests to increase the vitamin A intake of individuals and households, understanding preferences for food or pill-based vehicles could be important. Preferences of Indian consumers (n = 120) and Canadian consumers (n = 102) were compared. Although extremely disparate population samples, data has indicated that vitamin A deficiency exists in both countries (Kirkpatrick and Tarasuk 2008; Wallace 2012). The objectives of this study were threefold: 1) to estimate the individual’s preferences for different vitamin A vehicles by their willingness to exchange supplements for vitamin A rich foods, 2) to examine the impact of perceptions of naturalness, knowledge of nutrition and diet, and food technology neophobia on Vitamin A vehicle preferences, and finally, 3) to compare the subsamples within Odisha, India and Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and identify common preference indicators that may be similar, suggesting factors that might be population independent and worth further investigation in recommending programs in vitamin A deficient populations elsewhere. A consumer choice experiment with a modified payment card was used to analyze the probability that individuals would exchange a food for supplements with which they were endowed. This allowed the calculation of willingness to pay (WTP) for different sources of vitamin A. These food-based sources included biofortified sweet potato (Meenakshi et al 2012), fortified edible oils (margarine in Canada), and carrots. Each of the food bundles satisfied seven days of recommended vitamin A intake. This way, participants could better understand what the equivalences were in terms of foods versus pills for vitamin A content. A survey was then administered to identify perceptions for naturalness, nutrition knowledge, and food technology neophobia of participants. These attitudes and perceptions were scored based on methods in the literature. Multinomial logit and random parameters logit regressions were used to estimate probabilities of exchanging each of the vitamin A rich goods within the choice set for vitamin A supplements. From the parameter estimates, the mean WTP to exchange supplements for fortified oil (or margarine in Canada), carrots, and biofortified sweet potato were calculated for the Indian and Canadian subsamples. Further, mean WTP to exchange supplements for a food was compared between participants with higher and lower scores for the three attitude measures. Results indicated that Indian participants with high confidence in their knowledge of nutrition and diet were willing to pay significantly less for fortified oil, carrots, or biofortified sweet potato compared to participants with lower confidence. High food technology neophobia…

Subjects/Keywords: biofortified foods; WTP; food technology neophobia; natural; vitamin A; supplements; consumer preferences; choice experiment; fortified foods; objective and subjective knowledge

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APA (6th Edition):

Ngo, S. (2016). Consumer preferences for different sources of vitamin A in Odisha, India and Alberta, Canada. (Masters Thesis). University of Alberta. Retrieved from https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/c6q182k18r

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ngo, Sandra. “Consumer preferences for different sources of vitamin A in Odisha, India and Alberta, Canada.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Alberta. Accessed January 21, 2021. https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/c6q182k18r.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ngo, Sandra. “Consumer preferences for different sources of vitamin A in Odisha, India and Alberta, Canada.” 2016. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Ngo S. Consumer preferences for different sources of vitamin A in Odisha, India and Alberta, Canada. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Alberta; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/c6q182k18r.

Council of Science Editors:

Ngo S. Consumer preferences for different sources of vitamin A in Odisha, India and Alberta, Canada. [Masters Thesis]. University of Alberta; 2016. Available from: https://era.library.ualberta.ca/files/c6q182k18r

3. Priyanka, Mathur. Separation and quantification of fourteen chemical forms of fat soluble vitamins in food matrices using solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry.

Degree: 2014, Texas Woman's University

A solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was developed for separation and quantification of vitamin A (retinol, beta-carotene, retinyl-palmitate, retinyl-acetate), vitamin D (D2, D3), vitamin E (alpha,beta,gamma,delta tocopherols, tocopheryl-acetate), and vitamin K (K1, K2, K3) from different food matrices. The polarities of all fourteen fat-soluble vitamins (FSVs) were determined and chemical properties of many different organic solvents were studied. Quantification was conducted using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). All fourteen fat-soluble vitamins were found to be non-polar in nature; beta-carotene was found to be the most non-polar vitamin in the group, followed by vitamin esters. Tocopherols, ketones (vitamins K1, K2, K3), and alcohols (vitamins D2, D3, and retinol) were found to be relatively more polar. All fourteen forms were soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and were thus extracted with DMSO and methanol from food matrices. To determine the recoveries of known concentrations of vitamin standards methanol and water were found to be suitable polar solvents for conditioning of the SPE column. Hexane was used for elution. This methodology was further applied to separate fourteen forms of FSVs from food matrices. 80-100% recoveries of FSVs were observed after SPE of provitamin samples (containing 2-3 ingredients). Poor recoveries of FSVs were observed after SPE of complex food samples such as multivitamin capsules, vitamin fortified drink mixes, and chewable nutrition tablets, which consisted of many different ingredients with varying polarities. The presence of other ingredients interfered with the SPE process leading to the elution of other compounds in the hexane solution along with FSVs. Repeated measures ANOVA compared means of total FSVs after SPE and total FSVs from food labels. No significant differences were observed in the means (p < 0.05). A strong reliability (alpha>0.9) was observed between the three SPE extractions from each food sample. This SPE methodology can therefore be used for consistent and efficient separation of FSVs from products which do not have compounds that interfere with the extraction process. Advisors/Committee Members: DiMarco, Nancy (advisor), Sheardy, Richard (advisor), Warren, Cynthia (advisor), Omary, Manal (advisor), Scott, Rene (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Pure sciences; Biological sciences; Health and environmental sciences; Fat soluble vitamins; LC-MS; Solid phase extraction; Solvent extraction; Vitamin fortified food; Vitamin supplements

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APA (6th Edition):

Priyanka, M. (2014). Separation and quantification of fourteen chemical forms of fat soluble vitamins in food matrices using solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry. (Thesis). Texas Woman's University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11274/9930

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Priyanka, Mathur. “Separation and quantification of fourteen chemical forms of fat soluble vitamins in food matrices using solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry.” 2014. Thesis, Texas Woman's University. Accessed January 21, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11274/9930.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Priyanka, Mathur. “Separation and quantification of fourteen chemical forms of fat soluble vitamins in food matrices using solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry.” 2014. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Priyanka M. Separation and quantification of fourteen chemical forms of fat soluble vitamins in food matrices using solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry. [Internet] [Thesis]. Texas Woman's University; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/9930.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Priyanka M. Separation and quantification of fourteen chemical forms of fat soluble vitamins in food matrices using solid phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry. [Thesis]. Texas Woman's University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11274/9930

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.