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You searched for subject:(Viral Morphogenesis). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Indian Institute of Science

1. Subhashri, R. Role Of Matrix Protein Of Rinderpest Virus In Viral Morphogenesis.

Degree: 2006, Indian Institute of Science

Rinderpest virus is an enveloped Nonsegmented Negative Stranded RNA Virus (NNSV) belonging to the genus Morbillivirus in the Family Paramyxoviridae and the causative organism for “cattle plague”. The virion has a transport component and a replication component. The transport component consists of a lipid membrane with two external membrane-anchored glycoproteins, namely Hemagglutinin (H) and Fusion (F) proteins that are necessary for cell entry and release of newly formed virus particles. The replication component consists of viral genomic RNA encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N) and a RNA polymerase complex (Large subunit L and phosphoprotein P). These two components are linked together by the matrix protein (M) that is believed to play a crucial role in the assembly and maturation of the virion particle by bringing the two major viral components together at the budding site in the host cell. To perform this function, M protein should be able to interact with the host cellular membrane, especially the plasma membrane in the case of Rinderpest virus, should be able to interact with itself to form multimers as well as with the nucleocapsid core. The function might include the interaction of M protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the other two envelope proteins namely F and H. To understand the role of matrix protein in Rinderpest virus life cycle, the following functions were characterized – 1) Matrix protein association with the host cell membrane. 2) Matrix protein association with nucleocapsid protein. Matrix protein association cellular membranes in rinderpest virus infected cells could be a result of its interaction with the cytoplasmic tails of the viral glycoproteins. Hence, this association was characterized in the absence of other viral proteins. In transiently transfected cells, M protein existed in two isoforms namely the soluble cytosolic form and membrane-bound form. The membrane-bound M protein associated stably with the membranes, most likely by a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which is inhibited at high salt or high pH, but not completely. Confocal microscopy analysis showed the presence of M protein in plasma membrane protrusions. When GFP was tagged with this protein, GFP was absent from nucleus and was present predominantly in the cytosol and the plasma membrane protrusions. However, M protein expression did not result in the release of membrane vesicles (Virus-like particles) into the culture supernatant implicating the requirement of other viral proteins in envelope acquisition. Matrix protein of RPV has been shown to co-sediment with nucleocapsid during mild preparation of RNP from virus-infected cells. This association was further investigated by virus solubilization. The matrix protein could be solubilised completely from virion only in the presence of detergent and high salt. This is in agreement with the previous observation from the laboratory that the purified matrix protein remained soluble in the presence of detergent and 1M NaCl. This… Advisors/Committee Members: Shaila, M S.

Subjects/Keywords: Glycoproteins; Lipid Membranes; Viral Morphogenesis; Rinderpest Virus; Virus Solubilization; Viral Proteins; Cattle Plague; Matrix Protein; Microbiology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Subhashri, R. (2006). Role Of Matrix Protein Of Rinderpest Virus In Viral Morphogenesis. (Thesis). Indian Institute of Science. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2005/382

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Subhashri, R. “Role Of Matrix Protein Of Rinderpest Virus In Viral Morphogenesis.” 2006. Thesis, Indian Institute of Science. Accessed July 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2005/382.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Subhashri, R. “Role Of Matrix Protein Of Rinderpest Virus In Viral Morphogenesis.” 2006. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Subhashri R. Role Of Matrix Protein Of Rinderpest Virus In Viral Morphogenesis. [Internet] [Thesis]. Indian Institute of Science; 2006. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2005/382.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Subhashri R. Role Of Matrix Protein Of Rinderpest Virus In Viral Morphogenesis. [Thesis]. Indian Institute of Science; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2005/382

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Florida

2. Boyd, Olga. Role of the E6 Gene in Vaccinia Virus Morphogenesis.

Degree: MS, Medical Sciences - Medicine, 2008, University of Florida

The E6R gene of vaccinia virus is an essential structural gene as suggested by preliminary experiments; however the function of E6 is unknown. To investigate the role of the E6R gene during vaccinia virus infection, two mutants, the temperature sensitive mutant Cts52 and the inducible mutant vE6i, each defective in synthesis of normal E6 protein under non-permissive conditions, have been analyzed. The results show that growth of both mutants is inhibited under non-permissive conditions; however both mutants are normal for DNA replication and virus gene expression. Protein processing of the major precursor proteins required for formation of mature virions is normal in the Cts52 mutant and absent in the vE6i mutant. Electron microscopy of Cts52 showed production of mature virions under non-permissive conditions which are indistinguishable from wild type mature virions in appearance, but vE6i formed empty immature virions under non-permissive conditions, and failed to make mature virions suggesting block in morphogenesis. In addition, dense (crystalloid) viroplasm was observed in cytoplasm of vE6i infected cells; crystalloids probably represent deposits of unpackaged viral DNA. Analysis of infected cells for viral DNA concatemer resolution showed DNA resolution occurs normally. The vE6i infection blocked in morphogenesis was analyzed for the ability to package the existing DNA and complete morphogenesis when permissive conditions were introduced. Thus, permissive conditions with DNA replication inhibitor introduced at 24 hours post-infection to cells infected under non-permissive conditions and which therefore had presumably formed crystalloids; the induction of E6 expression resulted in increased virus yield, suggesting formation of mature virions via processing of existing viral DNA. Finally, purified Cts52 viral particles grown under non-permissive conditions are defective in core transcription in vitro. A dual role of E6 gene in infection suggested the following: 1) in the virion core E6 may have a subtle direct or indirect role in viral transcription; 2) E6 is essential for association of viroplasm and crescents to encapsidate DNA into immature virions. Understanding E6R gene function will advance our knowledge of vaccinia virus structure and assembly. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Condit, Richard C. (committee chair), Bloom, David C. (committee member), Rowe, Thomas C. (committee member), Moussatche, Nissin (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: DNA; DNA replication; Electron microscopy; Genomes; Infections; Morphogenesis; Vaccinia; Vaccinia virus; Viral morphology; Virion; assembly, poxvirus, structure, vaccinia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Boyd, O. (2008). Role of the E6 Gene in Vaccinia Virus Morphogenesis. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022806

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boyd, Olga. “Role of the E6 Gene in Vaccinia Virus Morphogenesis.” 2008. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed July 15, 2020. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022806.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boyd, Olga. “Role of the E6 Gene in Vaccinia Virus Morphogenesis.” 2008. Web. 15 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Boyd O. Role of the E6 Gene in Vaccinia Virus Morphogenesis. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2008. [cited 2020 Jul 15]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022806.

Council of Science Editors:

Boyd O. Role of the E6 Gene in Vaccinia Virus Morphogenesis. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2008. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022806

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